counter create hit Madame Claude: Her Secret World of Pleasure, Privilege, and Power - Download Free eBook
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

Madame Claude: Her Secret World of Pleasure, Privilege, and Power

Availability: Ready to download

The life of Madame Claude, the brilliant and complicated and utterly amoral woman behind the most glamorous and successful escort service in the world. In post-WWII Paris, Madame Claude ran the most exclusive finishing school in the world. Her alumnae married more fortunes, titles and famous names than any of the Seven Sisters. The names on her client list were epic--Kenned The life of Madame Claude, the brilliant and complicated and utterly amoral woman behind the most glamorous and successful escort service in the world. In post-WWII Paris, Madame Claude ran the most exclusive finishing school in the world. Her alumnae married more fortunes, titles and famous names than any of the Seven Sisters. The names on her client list were epic--Kennedy, Rothschild, Agnelli, Onassis, Niarchos, Brando, Sinatra, McQueen, Picasso, Chagall, Qaddafi, the Shah, and that's just for starters. By the 1950s, she was the richest and most celebrated self-made woman in Europe, as much of a legend as Coco Chanel. Born Fernande Grudet, a poor Jewish girl in the aristocratic chateau city of Angers, the future Madame led a life of high adventure--resistance fighter, concentration camp survivor, gun moll of the Corsican Mafia and erstwhile streetwalker--before becoming the ultimate broker between beauty and power. She harnessed the emerging postwar technology of the telephone to create the concept of the call girl. But Madame Claude wasn't just selling sex--she was the world's ultimate matchmaker, the Dolly Levi of the Power Elite. She was also one of the most controversial--and most wanted--women in the world. Now, through his own conversations with the woman herself and interviews with the great men and remarkable women on whom she built her empire, social historian and biographer William Stadiem pierces the veil of Claude's secret, forbidden universe of pleasure and privilege.


Compare
Ads Banner

The life of Madame Claude, the brilliant and complicated and utterly amoral woman behind the most glamorous and successful escort service in the world. In post-WWII Paris, Madame Claude ran the most exclusive finishing school in the world. Her alumnae married more fortunes, titles and famous names than any of the Seven Sisters. The names on her client list were epic--Kenned The life of Madame Claude, the brilliant and complicated and utterly amoral woman behind the most glamorous and successful escort service in the world. In post-WWII Paris, Madame Claude ran the most exclusive finishing school in the world. Her alumnae married more fortunes, titles and famous names than any of the Seven Sisters. The names on her client list were epic--Kennedy, Rothschild, Agnelli, Onassis, Niarchos, Brando, Sinatra, McQueen, Picasso, Chagall, Qaddafi, the Shah, and that's just for starters. By the 1950s, she was the richest and most celebrated self-made woman in Europe, as much of a legend as Coco Chanel. Born Fernande Grudet, a poor Jewish girl in the aristocratic chateau city of Angers, the future Madame led a life of high adventure--resistance fighter, concentration camp survivor, gun moll of the Corsican Mafia and erstwhile streetwalker--before becoming the ultimate broker between beauty and power. She harnessed the emerging postwar technology of the telephone to create the concept of the call girl. But Madame Claude wasn't just selling sex--she was the world's ultimate matchmaker, the Dolly Levi of the Power Elite. She was also one of the most controversial--and most wanted--women in the world. Now, through his own conversations with the woman herself and interviews with the great men and remarkable women on whom she built her empire, social historian and biographer William Stadiem pierces the veil of Claude's secret, forbidden universe of pleasure and privilege.

30 review for Madame Claude: Her Secret World of Pleasure, Privilege, and Power

  1. 4 out of 5

    Petra-X

    Update I finished the book. I'm not sure if it is a 1 star or a 5 star. I'm not sure that it isn't a self-serving, mostly-invented, scurrilious little book, or if it is a thoroughly enjoyable read of a distopian universe where everything, everything boils down to money. So that is two angles I could address. Or I could just do sex. All the tests, very graphic, the would-be 'swans' went through in order to become high-priced prostitutes. He isn't a fan of feminism. One of those angles, but which? Update I finished the book. I'm not sure if it is a 1 star or a 5 star. I'm not sure that it isn't a self-serving, mostly-invented, scurrilious little book, or if it is a thoroughly enjoyable read of a distopian universe where everything, everything boils down to money. So that is two angles I could address. Or I could just do sex. All the tests, very graphic, the would-be 'swans' went through in order to become high-priced prostitutes. He isn't a fan of feminism. One of those angles, but which? Written when I was reading it. (view spoiler)[One word has spoiled this book for me. Bellicose. (Want to skip the rant and read about Jack Kennedy's sexual prowess? Go here **) Instead of sticking to the life of Madame Claude, the author wanted to give readers his opinion, a despicable one. He is talking about Fernande Gaudet (Madame Claude's real name)'s ambition to be a 'general and one day perhaps, a commander in chief' of the war between men and women. And says, Madame Claude would forge her reputation not as a bellicose feminist but as the ultimate peacemaker,". Right, a brothel keeper selling women's bodies is more praiseworthy, 'the ultimate peacemaker' than a feminist trying to get women the rights to earn a good living without having to sell sex. Knowing that is not only the author's attitude, but one he wanted the reader to know early on in the book, is going to colour everything he writes from now on. **However there is a really amusing anecdote about Jack Kennedy. On his first official visit to Paris with Jackie he wanted to have sex with one of Madame Claude's expensive call girls. He only had one hour to spare. The girl chosen for him was a fitting model for Givenchy, a Jackie lookalike and wearing the exact same dress that Jackie would be wearing that evening. After only 30 minutes she left the boudoir with her hair and dress immaculate. As she later revealed, Jack had wanted to know why Jackie wouldn't wear an American designer, Oleg Cassini, but only Givenchy. So she had done a striptease and shown him how a Givenchy dress was constructed and why it was superior to American designs. That didn't leave long for sex, and her fashionable blown-out bouffant had not one hair out of place. That says plenty for Jack Kennedy and sex. No wonder Jackie wasn't that keen. No wonder he often paid for it. And he really did pay. A streetwalker was the equivalent of $5, a high-class call girl $50, but Madame Claude charged $2,000. A travelling expense the American tax payer paid. :-) So continuing to read, but not with so much pleasure as before "bellicose feminist". (hide spoiler)]

  2. 4 out of 5

    Antigone

    Take this book to the beach... ...if you need a conversation starter. Madame Claude was the first procurer to make use of the telephone, thus coining the phrase "call girls." She was also the first to thoroughly vet her employees with an eye toward fulfilling the fantasies of wealthy men. Hers was a rigorous weeding-out process that was often followed by plastic surgery to perfect what she deemed perfectible. This sort of innocuous information will provide a fine cover for your own seaside vettin Take this book to the beach... ...if you need a conversation starter. Madame Claude was the first procurer to make use of the telephone, thus coining the phrase "call girls." She was also the first to thoroughly vet her employees with an eye toward fulfilling the fantasies of wealthy men. Hers was a rigorous weeding-out process that was often followed by plastic surgery to perfect what she deemed perfectible. This sort of innocuous information will provide a fine cover for your own seaside vetting procedure. (Lovely eyes? Check. Sense of humor? Check. Not afraid of ice cream? Check.) Take this book to the beach... ...if you require a volume you can toss into the sand on a moment's notice. Sunscreen must be re-applied, as you know, and bodies turned to roast evenly. Then there is lunch to consider. And the ever-rising tide. And the visit from the snuffling dog someone mistakenly imagined people would be pleased to see frolicking along the shore. This is a book that requires no sustained attention, the reading of which might actually be improved by frequent breaks from the endless (and often excruciatingly pointless) name-dropping. Take this book to the beach... ...if the beach you've gone to is so beautiful you find the need to pinch yourself just to prove you're awake and not caught in some deliciously tormenting dream. These pages will provide that painful pluck with their wealth of corrupted adages and overworked expressions. Examples: Beauty may have been in the eyes of the Bel Air beholder...The cash cow had been sent to the abattoir...This was a world where one hand was washing the other so much that it could have been the basis for a designer-soap commercial. (Have no fear, the cheese here is ripe and distinctly aromatic.) So yes, my advice would be to take this book to the beach... ...and give a little thought to leaving it there.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Amy Shepherd

    Horribly written. A complete bore. The author distastefully insults the president throughout the course of the book, which has nothing to do with the subject matter being discussed.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jeannette M. Hartman

    For decades, I've been curious about Madame Claude. Now, having read Stadiem's book, I wish I'd saved my energy. Madame Claude was a legend in her time. Stadiem credits her with being the inventor of the call girl and of turning sex into a luxury brand to equal Hermes, Louis Vuitton or Chanel. Her customers were the rich and the powerful men of the world, and the "girls" she employed appeared to be aristocratic, beautiful, educated and sophisticated -- regardless of their origins. Madame Claude's For decades, I've been curious about Madame Claude. Now, having read Stadiem's book, I wish I'd saved my energy. Madame Claude was a legend in her time. Stadiem credits her with being the inventor of the call girl and of turning sex into a luxury brand to equal Hermes, Louis Vuitton or Chanel. Her customers were the rich and the powerful men of the world, and the "girls" she employed appeared to be aristocratic, beautiful, educated and sophisticated -- regardless of their origins. Madame Claude's fans talk on about the wonderful marriages her girls made, the careers they stepped into and the money they made. Her foes talk about how long her girls had to work to pay off the money she fronted them for plastic surgery, cosmetic dentistry and designer wardrobes. Her heyday was the 1960s to the mid-1970s when fast, affordable jet travel made it possible to fly to Paris for the weekend or to send girls around the world to clients. But that world started crumbling when the French government went after her for tax evasion, feminism opened doors to other ways of being successful as a woman, the AIDS epidemic arrived and technology made virtual sex accessible to anyone with a computer. Ultimately this is a sad tale of a woman focused on money and unable to accept changing times. This is a classic celebrity biography with lots of famous names being dropped and peeks into the inner sanctums of the very rich and powerful.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Nicole

    Kinda fun but kinda went over my head. Might be interesting if your really aware of/have an interest in all the names it drops, but if you aren’t it’s kind of lacklustre. Clearly a lot of research and information went into this book so I can appreciate that, but I felt like it was just telling the same story over and over with different names slotted in. There are some fun scenarios depicted and some interesting juicy tidbits, but this book didn’t quite measure up to what I expected it to be.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Dawn

    This was an interesting book. At first I got sucked into google looking up all the French people and French phrases I did not know. When that got time consuming I glossed over it with the hopeful plan that I will look them up. (It probably will not happen.) I also wish the author did not use pronouns as much and stuck to proper nouns when describing personal situations but that is only my personal preference. It was a very insightful story to a very decadent world.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Alisa

    This book is written in a coy style "just us girls" style that is annoying...even though the author is a gay man. I'll finish it because I paid Audible for it, but what schlock. Even the narration is this haughty-wannabe-classy-impersonation voice that makes it

  8. 5 out of 5

    remove

  9. 5 out of 5

    Rosy

  10. 5 out of 5

    Melanie

  11. 5 out of 5

    Samantha

  12. 4 out of 5

    Madalina

  13. 5 out of 5

    Julie

  14. 5 out of 5

    Sophia

  15. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

  16. 4 out of 5

    Sallie

  17. 4 out of 5

    Wendy

  18. 4 out of 5

    Patricia Carter

  19. 4 out of 5

    Christie Buie

  20. 4 out of 5

    Linda Chancellor

  21. 4 out of 5

    Reet Pärna

  22. 5 out of 5

    Sharon Cockroft

  23. 5 out of 5

    Helene Weinreb

  24. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth Doyle

  25. 4 out of 5

    St. Martin's Press Nonfiction

  26. 4 out of 5

    Colleen

  27. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

  28. 5 out of 5

    Janet

  29. 4 out of 5

    Rick Pitterle

  30. 4 out of 5

    Miyoshi

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.