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Dublin-born Bram Stoker lived in London, meeting other notable authors such as Arthur Conan Doyle and Oscar Wilde. Apart from the ground-breaking Dracula Stoker wrote supernatural horror short stories, many of which, including 'The Judge's House' and 'Dracula's Guest', are featured here with extracts from his longer works. Dublin-born Bram Stoker lived in London, meeting other notable authors such as Arthur Conan Doyle and Oscar Wilde. Apart from the ground-breaking Dracula Stoker wrote supernatural horror short stories, many of which, including 'The Judge's House' and 'Dracula's Guest', are featured here with extracts from his longer works.


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Dublin-born Bram Stoker lived in London, meeting other notable authors such as Arthur Conan Doyle and Oscar Wilde. Apart from the ground-breaking Dracula Stoker wrote supernatural horror short stories, many of which, including 'The Judge's House' and 'Dracula's Guest', are featured here with extracts from his longer works. Dublin-born Bram Stoker lived in London, meeting other notable authors such as Arthur Conan Doyle and Oscar Wilde. Apart from the ground-breaking Dracula Stoker wrote supernatural horror short stories, many of which, including 'The Judge's House' and 'Dracula's Guest', are featured here with extracts from his longer works.

53 review for Bram Stoker Horror Stories

  1. 4 out of 5

    Sophie

    On the whole interesting read to get an idea of what gothic horror stories Stoker has written next to Dracula. However, something I could absolutely not enjoy was the amount of romantic subplots which were completely uninteresting because both parties mostly had the personality of a wet dishcloth. Given that a lot of stories spent WAY more time on the romance than the actual horror, this made it a difficult read for me sometimes. The stories are still interesting and can be appreciated for the t On the whole interesting read to get an idea of what gothic horror stories Stoker has written next to Dracula. However, something I could absolutely not enjoy was the amount of romantic subplots which were completely uninteresting because both parties mostly had the personality of a wet dishcloth. Given that a lot of stories spent WAY more time on the romance than the actual horror, this made it a difficult read for me sometimes. The stories are still interesting and can be appreciated for the time they were written in, but if I have to read one more time how two pasty Brits yearn for each other while there is absolutely nothing appealing in either of them, I will throw something out of the window.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Lauren • Gothic Bookworm

    Good afternoon horror fanatics and gothic ghouls!
Today I will be reviewing Gothic Fantasy: Bram Stoker, Horror Stories, published by Flame Tree Press earlier this year with a foreword by Dr. Catherine Wynne. I will be reviewing this specific collection as a whole, with details of how to purchase a copy after my review

Before I even opened this ambitious collection, I was in awe of the cover design; a black and navy backdrop with silver embellishments drawing your eye to the gargoyle guarding t Good afternoon horror fanatics and gothic ghouls!
Today I will be reviewing Gothic Fantasy: Bram Stoker, Horror Stories, published by Flame Tree Press earlier this year with a foreword by Dr. Catherine Wynne. I will be reviewing this specific collection as a whole, with details of how to purchase a copy after my review

Before I even opened this ambitious collection, I was in awe of the cover design; a black and navy backdrop with silver embellishments drawing your eye to the gargoyle guarding the stories within. The intricate details and the illustrations on the pages really tie this collection together, and the eerie patterns make this book a gorgeous addition to my bookshelf. 
The foreword by Dr. Catherine Wynne puts a perfectly personal touch to the collection; describing Stoker's history, Wynne paints her own impression of him, whilst at the same time discusses the gothic writings included in this edition. On Wynne’s description, the reader is swept up into the world of the gothic, where Stoker doesn’t let you leave:
"This anthology reveals a writer who should not be limited by the achievement of Dracula or by comparison to anyone else. His stories reveal that Bram Stoker was in his own right a master of the gruesome, the grotesque and the uncanny. Bram Stoker will  haunt you", (Dr. Catherine Wynne, p. 6)
The publishers note is also very charming, letting the reader know that all of Stoker’s works that are included in this collection are available to download for free from their website. 
I am a HUGE fan of Stoker, of course the classic Dracula is etched in my mind from University, but I also enjoy reading his stories for pleasure. I am quite well acquainted with his other stories, such as ‘The Judge’s House’, a psychological horror leaving the reader guessing where the supernatural forces lie. Or even ‘A Star Trap’, which, if you’ve read my article on ‘How gothic is Bram Stoker?’, you will know I gave this a 10/10 on the gothic scale. However, all though I would call myself a Stoker-lover, there were some grizzly and spooky stories I hadn’t read of his, all to be found within the pages of this collection.
For example, I hadn’t heard of ‘The Crystal Cup’, but the macabre and haunted undertones of the story make it not only memorable, but unnervingly fascinating.  “I found at first that my hand has lost its cunning, and I was beginning to despair, when, like the memory of a dream, there came back in my ears and the strains of the old song”. (p. 374)
Switching to ‘The Burial of Rats’, a long-loved story of mine, the twisted streets of Paris are the very essence of gothic literature, with curiosity leading the reader deeper into the Parisian slums, “In the midst of these huts was one of the strangest adaptations -I cannot say habitations- I had ever seen.” (p. 349) 
Moving on from the short stories, no collection would be complete without including extracts from Stoker’s novels, such as Dracula, The Jewel of Seven Stars, and The Lady of the Shroud. Starting with Dracula, I am a great believer in extracts from novels being the first few chapters, not smack bang in the middle of the book. I think the publishers also felt this as the first four chapters are included in the collection, aka, Jonathan Harker’s journal and his arrival at Dracula’s castle. What better way to start a horror novel with some of the most terrifying and mind-boggling scenes of the entire book, meeting the Count and observing his strange behaviour, “He smiled, such a soft, smooth, diabolical smile that I knew there was some trick behind his smoothness” (p. 113).
The Jewel of Seven Stars, which is my all-time favourite Stoker story, is also included in this collection (which I was very happy about!). Lesser known than Dracula, this story is full of death, curses, and evil, and was conducted during the Egyptomania phase in Victorian Britain, “Then, and then only, did the full horror of the whole thing burst upon me! There, in the full glare of the light, the whole material and sordid side of death seemed staringly real”. (p. 246)

The Lady of the Shroud is the last story included in the book, with chapters three to five available. As previously mentioned, I believe that all excerpts should be from chapter 1 onwards, but I am willing to make an exception; as for me, the first two chapters of The lady of the Shroud are unnecessary and it only really gets going at chapter three! “I have waited till now – well into midday – before beginning to set down the details of the strange episode of last night.” (p. 420) 
Throughout the collection, recommendations about other stories you may enjoy are listed, which I thought was a personal touch from the publisher, and also makes you wanting more Stokeresque stories!
This assembly of stories is perfectly displayed and Flame Tree Press have really outdone themselves. They are known for producing gorgeous editions of collected works, such as H. P. Lovecraft and Edgar Allan Poe, yet I believe their Stoker collection of Gothic Fantasy is exceptionally outstanding.

Thanks for reading my review! As always, I love to hear from you.
The Gothic Bookworm

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jeff

    The stories are generally excellent. The publication, on the other hand, is terrible. This is one of those jobs where a small publisher has downloaded a bunch of text files from Project Gutenberg, selected and cut them, added a banal foreword or two, and then had the whole thing printed. The selections are strange: a few short stories, a couple of novellas, and then a number of incomplete slices out of larger novels. I don’t see much point in reading just chapters 3–5 of “The Lady of the Shroud, The stories are generally excellent. The publication, on the other hand, is terrible. This is one of those jobs where a small publisher has downloaded a bunch of text files from Project Gutenberg, selected and cut them, added a banal foreword or two, and then had the whole thing printed. The selections are strange: a few short stories, a couple of novellas, and then a number of incomplete slices out of larger novels. I don’t see much point in reading just chapters 3–5 of “The Lady of the Shroud,” but that is what I’m here offered. These sub-selections of portions of books make up the majority of the pages. The short stories and novellas, however, are enjoyable. Stoker is an excellent writer: easy to read, with very vivid descriptions, appealing characters, and engrossing plots.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Vincent Darlage

    Very happy to have finally read some more works of Bram Stoker. I love "Dracula," so reading more of his works seemed in order after all these years. However, Stoker really grabbed ahold of lightning with his most famous work - his other stories are minor efforts (at best) and are largely description-heavy snooze fests. They have glimmers of genius, but digging them out of the mire of exacting description is difficult. However, I am glad to have read them - and this is a really NICE edition of t Very happy to have finally read some more works of Bram Stoker. I love "Dracula," so reading more of his works seemed in order after all these years. However, Stoker really grabbed ahold of lightning with his most famous work - his other stories are minor efforts (at best) and are largely description-heavy snooze fests. They have glimmers of genius, but digging them out of the mire of exacting description is difficult. However, I am glad to have read them - and this is a really NICE edition of those stories.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Chloe Lydia

    The Invisible Giant is kinda scary as we are currently in a pandemic, I get subtle gay vibes from Dracula (name one straight vampire, I dare you, see its impossible), and The Judge's House and The Squaw were the only stories that I actually felt really scared reading. The Invisible Giant is kinda scary as we are currently in a pandemic, I get subtle gay vibes from Dracula (name one straight vampire, I dare you, see its impossible), and The Judge's House and The Squaw were the only stories that I actually felt really scared reading.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Nathan Arrowsmith

    Some fantastic stories like The Judge's House and novels like The Jewel of the Seven Stars. As with any collection there are some hits and misses but Bram Stoker has great stories beyond Dracula. Some fantastic stories like The Judge's House and novels like The Jewel of the Seven Stars. As with any collection there are some hits and misses but Bram Stoker has great stories beyond Dracula.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Bailey Peyton

    More misses than hits in this one. To be fair, I was familiar with Bram Stoker the way most people are ("The Judge's House", and of course, Dracula). Can't say the stories didn't have variety; some were set in medieval times, complete with Kings, while others were written for the author's contemporary period, focusing on ghosts and gypsies (the spelling on one story differs). Some were just a bit too abstract for me, and you also have random chapters of actual novels tossed in, that were great i More misses than hits in this one. To be fair, I was familiar with Bram Stoker the way most people are ("The Judge's House", and of course, Dracula). Can't say the stories didn't have variety; some were set in medieval times, complete with Kings, while others were written for the author's contemporary period, focusing on ghosts and gypsies (the spelling on one story differs). Some were just a bit too abstract for me, and you also have random chapters of actual novels tossed in, that were great in theory (you can get a taste of the work before spending the money), bad in practice (they kind of messed up the flow of short story reading, and you can't judge a work by a few chapters... at least for me). If you read anthologies, best to have different authors touching on the same subject/genre, but if you do read an author specific collection, just know, they're not all going to be diamonds. Still, I can't be too mad, not for ten dollars, anyway. Here are my favorites: -"The Chain of Destiny" -"The Judge's House" -"Dracula's Guest" -"The Gipsy Prophecy" (Yes. That's how Gypsy is spelled here.) -"A Dream of Red Hands" -"The Red Stockade" -"The Crystal Cup" -"The Shadow Builder" -"A Star Trap" -"The Coming of Abel Behenna"

  8. 4 out of 5

    Catherine Milos

    Good classic work, if you can look past the colonialism and racism and sexism of the time/tales.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Valeria Martin del campo

  10. 4 out of 5

    Li Hedenmalm

  11. 5 out of 5

    Mandi

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jenna Lemay

  13. 4 out of 5

    Emma ♡

  14. 5 out of 5

    Bloss ♡

  15. 4 out of 5

    Molly Lyions

  16. 5 out of 5

    Tânia

  17. 5 out of 5

    Lady Disdain

  18. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

  19. 5 out of 5

    Nichole

  20. 4 out of 5

    Miniaturespace

  21. 5 out of 5

    Danalli Calhoun

  22. 5 out of 5

    Zoe

  23. 4 out of 5

    The star struck rabbit

  24. 4 out of 5

    Krystle McFadden

  25. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Greenwood

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jes Olivares

  27. 5 out of 5

    Keira

  28. 4 out of 5

    Victoria Pope

  29. 5 out of 5

    Colleen

  30. 4 out of 5

    Desi

  31. 5 out of 5

    Henry

  32. 5 out of 5

    Stefanie

  33. 5 out of 5

    Carmen van der Maten

  34. 5 out of 5

    John Day

  35. 5 out of 5

    Taylor Henning

  36. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

  37. 4 out of 5

    DZMM

  38. 4 out of 5

    Angelique

  39. 4 out of 5

    Guadalupe Villalobos

  40. 5 out of 5

    cat

  41. 5 out of 5

    Alla McRae

  42. 4 out of 5

    Carl Mcdaniel

  43. 4 out of 5

    Kristen

  44. 5 out of 5

    Meg Ruddy

  45. 5 out of 5

    Lady Kincaid

  46. 4 out of 5

    Drix Tabligan

  47. 5 out of 5

    Zuly Ca

  48. 4 out of 5

    Nancy

  49. 5 out of 5

    Kelsey

  50. 4 out of 5

    James

  51. 4 out of 5

    Walter

  52. 5 out of 5

    J.S.

  53. 4 out of 5

    Cambria

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