counter create hit From Selma to Moscow: How Human Rights Activists Transformed U.S. Foreign Policy - Download Free eBook
Hot Best Seller

From Selma to Moscow: How Human Rights Activists Transformed U.S. Foreign Policy

Availability: Ready to download

The 1960s marked a transformation of human rights activism in the United States. At a time of increased concern for the rights of their fellow citizens--civil and political rights, as well as the social and economic rights that Great Society programs sought to secure--many Americans saw inconsistencies between domestic and foreign policy and advocated for a new approach. T The 1960s marked a transformation of human rights activism in the United States. At a time of increased concern for the rights of their fellow citizens--civil and political rights, as well as the social and economic rights that Great Society programs sought to secure--many Americans saw inconsistencies between domestic and foreign policy and advocated for a new approach. The activism that arose from the upheavals of the 1960s fundamentally altered U.S. foreign policy--yet previous accounts have often overlooked its crucial role. In From Selma to Moscow, Sarah B. Snyder traces the influence of human rights activists and advances a new interpretation of U.S. foreign policy in the "long 1960s." She shows how transnational connections and social movements spurred American activism that achieved legislation that curbed military and economic assistance to repressive governments, created institutions to monitor human rights around the world, and enshrined human rights in U.S. foreign policy making for years to come. Snyder analyzes how Americans responded to repression in the Soviet Union, racial discrimination in Southern Rhodesia, authoritarianism in South Korea, and coups in Greece and Chile. By highlighting the importance of nonstate and lower-level actors, Snyder shows how this activism established the networks and tactics critical to the institutionalization of human rights. A major work of international and transnational history, From Selma to Moscow reshapes our understanding of the role of human rights activism in transforming U.S. foreign policy in the 1960s and 1970s and highlights timely lessons for those seeking to promote a policy agenda resisted by the White House.


Compare

The 1960s marked a transformation of human rights activism in the United States. At a time of increased concern for the rights of their fellow citizens--civil and political rights, as well as the social and economic rights that Great Society programs sought to secure--many Americans saw inconsistencies between domestic and foreign policy and advocated for a new approach. T The 1960s marked a transformation of human rights activism in the United States. At a time of increased concern for the rights of their fellow citizens--civil and political rights, as well as the social and economic rights that Great Society programs sought to secure--many Americans saw inconsistencies between domestic and foreign policy and advocated for a new approach. The activism that arose from the upheavals of the 1960s fundamentally altered U.S. foreign policy--yet previous accounts have often overlooked its crucial role. In From Selma to Moscow, Sarah B. Snyder traces the influence of human rights activists and advances a new interpretation of U.S. foreign policy in the "long 1960s." She shows how transnational connections and social movements spurred American activism that achieved legislation that curbed military and economic assistance to repressive governments, created institutions to monitor human rights around the world, and enshrined human rights in U.S. foreign policy making for years to come. Snyder analyzes how Americans responded to repression in the Soviet Union, racial discrimination in Southern Rhodesia, authoritarianism in South Korea, and coups in Greece and Chile. By highlighting the importance of nonstate and lower-level actors, Snyder shows how this activism established the networks and tactics critical to the institutionalization of human rights. A major work of international and transnational history, From Selma to Moscow reshapes our understanding of the role of human rights activism in transforming U.S. foreign policy in the 1960s and 1970s and highlights timely lessons for those seeking to promote a policy agenda resisted by the White House.

33 review for From Selma to Moscow: How Human Rights Activists Transformed U.S. Foreign Policy

  1. 5 out of 5

    Robin Kirk

    Really interesting history of links between the international and national human rights movement and the civil rights movement.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Elise

    it does give a lot of information on specific cases, which is good, but i don't know it does give a lot of information on specific cases, which is good, but i don't know

  3. 5 out of 5

    Loïs Machelessen

  4. 4 out of 5

    Tyler Goldberger

  5. 5 out of 5

    Patrick Lanham

  6. 5 out of 5

    Subhajit Das

  7. 5 out of 5

    Lauren

  8. 4 out of 5

    Dan Leatham

  9. 5 out of 5

    Max Ng

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jeff Schauer

  11. 4 out of 5

    Ricky Stein

  12. 4 out of 5

    Angela Karnes

  13. 5 out of 5

    Farrah Brown

  14. 5 out of 5

    John Willis

  15. 4 out of 5

    Cate

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jojo

  17. 4 out of 5

    Kyle

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jamison H

  19. 4 out of 5

    John F. Kennedy Presidential Library

  20. 4 out of 5

    Anastasia Nesbitt

  21. 4 out of 5

    Mary-Anne

  22. 5 out of 5

    Adrienne Minh-Chau Le

  23. 5 out of 5

    Arnór Gunnar

  24. 5 out of 5

    Korri

  25. 5 out of 5

    Lizzie

  26. 4 out of 5

    Adom Cooper

  27. 4 out of 5

    Mark

  28. 4 out of 5

    Steven Leroy

  29. 5 out of 5

    Francisco Onofre

  30. 5 out of 5

    Corbin Kappler

  31. 5 out of 5

    Niels Werij

  32. 4 out of 5

    Emrys

  33. 5 out of 5

    Marianne

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.