counter create hit There's Something in the Water: Environmental Racism in Indigenous & Black Communities - Download Free eBook
Hot Best Seller

There's Something in the Water: Environmental Racism in Indigenous & Black Communities

Availability: Ready to download

In There's Something In The Water, Ingrid R. G. Waldron examines the legacy of environmental racism and its health impacts in Indigenous and Black communities in Canada, using Nova Scotia as a case study, and the grassroots resistance activities by Indigenous and Black communities against the pollution and poisoning of their communities. Using settler colonialism as the ove In There's Something In The Water, Ingrid R. G. Waldron examines the legacy of environmental racism and its health impacts in Indigenous and Black communities in Canada, using Nova Scotia as a case study, and the grassroots resistance activities by Indigenous and Black communities against the pollution and poisoning of their communities. Using settler colonialism as the overarching theory, Waldron unpacks how environmental racism operates as a mechanism of erasure enabled by the intersecting dynamics of white supremacy, power, state-sanctioned racial violence, neoliberalism and racial capitalism in white settler societies. By and large, the environmental justice narrative in Nova Scotia fails to make race explicit, obscuring it within discussions on class, and this type of strategic inadvertence mutes the specificity of Mi'kmaq and African Nova Scotian experiences with racism and environmental hazards in Nova Scotia. By redefining the parameters of critique around the environmental justice narrative and movement in Nova Scotia and Canada, Waldron opens a space for a more critical dialogue on how environmental racism manifests itself within this intersectional context. Waldron also illustrates the ways in which the effects of environmental racism are compounded by other forms of oppression to further dehumanize and harm communities already dealing with pre-existing vulnerabilities, such as long-standing social and economic inequality. Finally, Waldron documents the long history of struggle, resistance, and mobilizing in Indigenous and Black communities to address environmental racism.


Compare

In There's Something In The Water, Ingrid R. G. Waldron examines the legacy of environmental racism and its health impacts in Indigenous and Black communities in Canada, using Nova Scotia as a case study, and the grassroots resistance activities by Indigenous and Black communities against the pollution and poisoning of their communities. Using settler colonialism as the ove In There's Something In The Water, Ingrid R. G. Waldron examines the legacy of environmental racism and its health impacts in Indigenous and Black communities in Canada, using Nova Scotia as a case study, and the grassroots resistance activities by Indigenous and Black communities against the pollution and poisoning of their communities. Using settler colonialism as the overarching theory, Waldron unpacks how environmental racism operates as a mechanism of erasure enabled by the intersecting dynamics of white supremacy, power, state-sanctioned racial violence, neoliberalism and racial capitalism in white settler societies. By and large, the environmental justice narrative in Nova Scotia fails to make race explicit, obscuring it within discussions on class, and this type of strategic inadvertence mutes the specificity of Mi'kmaq and African Nova Scotian experiences with racism and environmental hazards in Nova Scotia. By redefining the parameters of critique around the environmental justice narrative and movement in Nova Scotia and Canada, Waldron opens a space for a more critical dialogue on how environmental racism manifests itself within this intersectional context. Waldron also illustrates the ways in which the effects of environmental racism are compounded by other forms of oppression to further dehumanize and harm communities already dealing with pre-existing vulnerabilities, such as long-standing social and economic inequality. Finally, Waldron documents the long history of struggle, resistance, and mobilizing in Indigenous and Black communities to address environmental racism.

30 review for There's Something in the Water: Environmental Racism in Indigenous & Black Communities

  1. 4 out of 5

    Meg (She/They)

    A must read for any activist and/or academic fighting for environmental justice. Caution: Waldron has a tendency to use jargon, so prepare to do additional research if unfamiliar with environmental justice literature. This book successfully addresses the lack of focus environmental academics have given to central pillars of environmental justice - race, class, gender, slavery, settler-colonialism, capitalism and the ways in which they uniquely intersect to produce diverse individual experiences. A must read for any activist and/or academic fighting for environmental justice. Caution: Waldron has a tendency to use jargon, so prepare to do additional research if unfamiliar with environmental justice literature. This book successfully addresses the lack of focus environmental academics have given to central pillars of environmental justice - race, class, gender, slavery, settler-colonialism, capitalism and the ways in which they uniquely intersect to produce diverse individual experiences. Environmentalism has strategically focused on conservation, wildlife protection, and sustainable development to avoid the politics of the historical, material, and structural ways white supremacy has created social inequalities. Waldron offers a balanced approach using a detailed settler-colonial framework and community based participatory research (CBPR) results to demonstrate how environmental racism has been produced and sustained by the Canadian state. Giving a much needed spot light on CBPR, the ENRICH project is a perfect example of how principled research can sincerely make a valuable contribution to community and its struggle for justice. This approach, in direct opposition to white dominated research initiatives that have left communities feeling over-researched and burned out, calls in researchers to form organic relationships, stay patient, prioritize joy, empathy, and celebration, and hire organizers that live in the region of study. A much needed reminder for Western academics that pride themselves on taking a neutral and distanced stance when engaging in data collection, which in reality is an approach that is complicit with white dominance. Waldron sets the stage by exploring the origins of Indigenous and Black genocide in Canada, followed by an exploration into the ways white supremacy manifests itself in the 21st century. Like many say, “the book was better than the movie”, Waldron’s analysis of environmental racism goes far beyond physical manifestations, as depicted in the documentary, of white supremacy. On top of BIPOC communities facing the consequences of toxic industries claiming their land, Waldron points to poverty, food insecurity, job insecurity, and lack of quality education as additional consequences of discriminatory policy that is the product of environmental racism. Examples of both Indigenous and Black communities experience with the effects of toxic effluent, fracking, PCB exposure, police violence, and regulatory neglect are put forward to show both the differences and similarities of their lived experiences. Common themes include: lack of political representation, little to no public/community consultation, and rejection of culturally significant processes/sites. Naturally, a call for solidarity follows. Waldron provides ample evidence of anti-colonial movements that disrupted industry take over including Africville Genealogy Society, Lucasville Community Association, Idle No More, Pictou Landing First Nations, Millbrook, and Sipekne’katik First Nation. While the book allocates few pages to discussing solutions, its strength lies in the ability to critically reflect on Canadian history, policy, and processes. Any researcher, upon reading this book, has a duty to center race in an environmental justice framework, validate and incorporate health equity impact assessments into their research, commit to culturally relevant participatory democracy, build coalitions between Indigenous-led, Black-led, and white-led organizations, and continue to interrogate research, policy actions, and activism rooted in colonial and white supremacist ideologies.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Samantha

    Amazing, incredible book about the reality of environmental racism here in Canada. I’ve learned so much from this book and will likely reread and reread it as much as possible.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Joanne MacNevin

    I gave this book a 3-star rating because I feel it is an important read. However, honestly, I would have preferred less academic speak, and more details about the concrete examples. I was really interested in what the individuals from the various communities had to say, and less interested in the philosophy. Plus, the philosophy was often repetitive - as is the way with academic books, I suppose. I just think the book would have been much more interesting if the author chose to discuss the philo I gave this book a 3-star rating because I feel it is an important read. However, honestly, I would have preferred less academic speak, and more details about the concrete examples. I was really interested in what the individuals from the various communities had to say, and less interested in the philosophy. Plus, the philosophy was often repetitive - as is the way with academic books, I suppose. I just think the book would have been much more interesting if the author chose to discuss the philosophy and academic stuff in the first couple of chapters, and then, for the rest of the book, focus on the communities in Nova Scotia and the individuals in those communities.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Cymric

    This books deals with an important issue, and one that has been largely neglected, and I salute the author for writing it, and for her work on the ENRICH project and Bill 111. However, the writing style is ponderous and has been heavily seeded with academic-speak. It is a laborious process to tease out the actual meaning from this jungle of verbal overgrowth.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Ciarán

    The rating is no comment on the ideas, just a judgment of it as a book. The author suffers greatly from logorrhea. This book is archetypical academic text that is far longer than necessary, has too many references and is overloaded with buzzwords.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Ruth

    In this study, Waldron highlights how environmental crises/issues disproportionately affect Indigenous and Black communities in Canada (while focusing specifically on Nova Scotia). She asserts that these environmental issues cannot be addressed without considering their intersections with race, class, gender, and structural determinants of health, and that they ultimately reflect environmental racism perpetuated by a larger colonial/neoliberal system. Importantly, Waldron's study also makes it c In this study, Waldron highlights how environmental crises/issues disproportionately affect Indigenous and Black communities in Canada (while focusing specifically on Nova Scotia). She asserts that these environmental issues cannot be addressed without considering their intersections with race, class, gender, and structural determinants of health, and that they ultimately reflect environmental racism perpetuated by a larger colonial/neoliberal system. Importantly, Waldron's study also makes it clear that environmental activism that ignores this intersectionality and does not centre the experiences and autonomy of Indigenous and Black communities is simply an extension of settler colonialism. While this book is from an academic perspective, Waldron's writing is captivating and she explains the framework for her study really clearly. A short but very informative read that has really expanded my understanding of intersectionality and the importance of addressing environmental racism in one's activism.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Thea Autumn

    Overall a great and enlightening read on a very important topic. Provides sufficient information, context, experience, and action on the topic so readers come out more knowledgeable. Only downfall would perhaps be the writing style in some places. When I've read passages to others they have complained that writing is too academic and may be a barrier for those not used to reading academic papers. Overall a great and enlightening read on a very important topic. Provides sufficient information, context, experience, and action on the topic so readers come out more knowledgeable. Only downfall would perhaps be the writing style in some places. When I've read passages to others they have complained that writing is too academic and may be a barrier for those not used to reading academic papers.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Artemis

    This book contains a lot of important information for those who are not already aware of the issues presented within. It is not the easiest book to read, but that may have been a personal issue due to my understanding a lot of the concepts already. I still have plenty of quotes tagged in the book, however, so it's definitely worth the full rating. Also, some things are worth working through, and this book is one of them. Thank you for the great book. This book contains a lot of important information for those who are not already aware of the issues presented within. It is not the easiest book to read, but that may have been a personal issue due to my understanding a lot of the concepts already. I still have plenty of quotes tagged in the book, however, so it's definitely worth the full rating. Also, some things are worth working through, and this book is one of them. Thank you for the great book.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Henry

    Very important information, but as someone studying health sciences I found it a lot too academic and written with inaccessible language at times. For that reason, it took me half a year to read because I kept putting it down. Glad I finished though, it was informative.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jamie Quinn

    Wonderfully written and extremely well researched, There’s Something in the Water is an eye-opening book that reveals many details of marginalized communities struggles combatting environmental racism. It highlights the long road that Canada has ahead in doing right by Indigenous and Black communities and eradicating the structural issues that lead to environmental racism in the first place. I am very glad to have been recommended this book and would recommend it to every Canadian. I had never h Wonderfully written and extremely well researched, There’s Something in the Water is an eye-opening book that reveals many details of marginalized communities struggles combatting environmental racism. It highlights the long road that Canada has ahead in doing right by Indigenous and Black communities and eradicating the structural issues that lead to environmental racism in the first place. I am very glad to have been recommended this book and would recommend it to every Canadian. I had never heard of the terms “environmental racism” and “environmental justice” prior to reading this book and I am glad that I am no longer ignorant to the fact that systemic racism in Canada is ongoing in multifaceted ways.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Rickie Skidmore

    I learnt a lot reading this book. Very interesting, important, and needed information and tactics within these pages. This book has influenced me to learn more and listen more to those who are most impacted with climate change and environmental damage. Wish it didn’t use as much “academic language” because I dont feel it’s easily accessible to everyone, and I think it should be something everyone reads.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Antara

    A relatively short book to propel me deeper into my awareness journey about indigenous issues in Canada. Environmental racism wasn’t really on my radar until recently, and I’m shocked at my previous ignorance. Canada needs to wake up and realize that when it comes to the systemic racism we so condemn in the states, it’s happening right in our backyards to the indigenous and vulnerable population.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jess

    The book is very good, but a little slow and dense if you're not already an environmental activist. Earlier chapters really set the stage for ongoing environmental racism in Canada (particularly Nova Scotia), overall background to environmental racism/justice, and the history of colonialism/racism/sexism/policy and violence that impact environmental racism. The documentary is a good companion as it goes straight into some of the ongoing issues that are discussed later on in the book. The book is very good, but a little slow and dense if you're not already an environmental activist. Earlier chapters really set the stage for ongoing environmental racism in Canada (particularly Nova Scotia), overall background to environmental racism/justice, and the history of colonialism/racism/sexism/policy and violence that impact environmental racism. The documentary is a good companion as it goes straight into some of the ongoing issues that are discussed later on in the book.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Alida Thomas

    While certainly an academic work and consequently a bit labourious in its language, the concepts and case studies explored within are VITAL for all Canadians to understand. For more accessible access to this important research, I'd recommend watching the film documentary of the same name and visiting the incredible ENRICH project. https://www.enrichproject.org While certainly an academic work and consequently a bit labourious in its language, the concepts and case studies explored within are VITAL for all Canadians to understand. For more accessible access to this important research, I'd recommend watching the film documentary of the same name and visiting the incredible ENRICH project. https://www.enrichproject.org

  15. 5 out of 5

    Dobbs

    This book was a lot of work to read and I will admit that I really struggled with it! A lot of the information is really good, but is presented in such an academic way that it is completely inaccessible. It honestly felt like I was reading a thesis, there was so much jargon and references that it made it difficult to read.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Chase

    This is such an important book and I urge everyone to read it. It addresses issues in Canada that have been neglected for too long. I did find it hard to read because the writing was heavily academic and because of that, it felt like a bit of a task at times to get through. I'm glad I finished it though and I encourage others to stick with it. This is such an important book and I urge everyone to read it. It addresses issues in Canada that have been neglected for too long. I did find it hard to read because the writing was heavily academic and because of that, it felt like a bit of a task at times to get through. I'm glad I finished it though and I encourage others to stick with it.

  17. 5 out of 5

    James Fisher

    A must-read for any East Coast environmental group or anyone concerned about the environmental impact government decisions have on marginalized communities. A little too academic for the casual reader, it nevertheless goes far in explaining environmental racism in Nova Scotia up to the present.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Eileen

    This book has sections that are very academic and sometimes the writing can come across as pompous. However, there is some very good and very important information here that needs to be read. Environmental Racism is a very serious issue and we have a lot of work to do!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Chelsea McMillen

    High rating for the important subject content, but I do recommend also watching the 2019 documentary by the same name that was directed by Elliot Page - there is where you get the most human-based interactions, whereas the book is quite heavily academic.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Allison

    A necessary read for all Nova Scotians.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Caroline

    The concepts and ideas deserve 5 stars, however, the ponderous way the book is written takes away from the very important information it contains.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Kelsey Drummond

    3.5 Read for class - very academic but extremely interesting

  23. 4 out of 5

    EmpowerPuffGurl

    What I loved about “There’s Something In The Water: Environmental Racism in Indigenous and Black Communities” by Ingrid R. G. Waldron:⁣ ⁣ 1) For those who live on the east coast of Canada, this book should be necessary reading! I never really learned about environmental racism other than briefly in university and this book was a great way to read up on issues in my own backyard.⁣ ⁣ 2) The book was used as reference for the documentary by the same name on Netflix produced by Ellen Page and Ian Daniel What I loved about “There’s Something In The Water: Environmental Racism in Indigenous and Black Communities” by Ingrid R. G. Waldron:⁣ ⁣ 1) For those who live on the east coast of Canada, this book should be necessary reading! I never really learned about environmental racism other than briefly in university and this book was a great way to read up on issues in my own backyard.⁣ ⁣ 2) The book was used as reference for the documentary by the same name on Netflix produced by Ellen Page and Ian Daniel. The documentary is also a must see but if you’re a nerd like me and love a good research-based non-fiction, look no further!⁣ ⁣ 3) Overall this one brings home an incredibly important message concerning the land that has been traditionally home to Black and Indigenous folks being used by corporations and governments in harmful ways that has effected folks for generations and will continue to do so. You neeeed to add this one to your anti-racist summer reading list! ⁣

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

  25. 5 out of 5

    Katrina Forrestall

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jada Tomlinson

  27. 5 out of 5

    Betsy Eudey

  28. 4 out of 5

    Florence

  29. 5 out of 5

    Pascal Raiche-Nogue

  30. 4 out of 5

    Ben Ur

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.