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Roses and Radicals: The Epic Story of How American Women Won the Right to Vote

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The United States of America is almost 250 years old, but American women won the right to vote less than a hundred years ago. And when the controversial nineteenth amendment to the U.S. Constitution-the one granting suffrage to women-was finally ratified in 1920, it passed by a mere one-vote margin. The amendment only succeeded because a courageous group of women had been r The United States of America is almost 250 years old, but American women won the right to vote less than a hundred years ago. And when the controversial nineteenth amendment to the U.S. Constitution-the one granting suffrage to women-was finally ratified in 1920, it passed by a mere one-vote margin. The amendment only succeeded because a courageous group of women had been relentlessly demanding the right to vote for more than seventy years. The leaders of the suffrage movement are heroes who were fearless in the face of ridicule, arrest, imprisonment, and even torture. Many of them devoted themselves to the cause knowing they wouldn't live to cast a ballot. The story of women's suffrage is epic, frustrating, and as complex as the women who fought for it. Illustrated with portraits, period cartoons, and other images, Roses and Radicals celebrates this captivating yet overlooked piece of American history and the women who made it happen.


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The United States of America is almost 250 years old, but American women won the right to vote less than a hundred years ago. And when the controversial nineteenth amendment to the U.S. Constitution-the one granting suffrage to women-was finally ratified in 1920, it passed by a mere one-vote margin. The amendment only succeeded because a courageous group of women had been r The United States of America is almost 250 years old, but American women won the right to vote less than a hundred years ago. And when the controversial nineteenth amendment to the U.S. Constitution-the one granting suffrage to women-was finally ratified in 1920, it passed by a mere one-vote margin. The amendment only succeeded because a courageous group of women had been relentlessly demanding the right to vote for more than seventy years. The leaders of the suffrage movement are heroes who were fearless in the face of ridicule, arrest, imprisonment, and even torture. Many of them devoted themselves to the cause knowing they wouldn't live to cast a ballot. The story of women's suffrage is epic, frustrating, and as complex as the women who fought for it. Illustrated with portraits, period cartoons, and other images, Roses and Radicals celebrates this captivating yet overlooked piece of American history and the women who made it happen.

30 review for Roses and Radicals: The Epic Story of How American Women Won the Right to Vote

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    I received this book for free from the publisher (Viking Children’s Books) in exchange for an honest review. Prior to reading this book I knew quite a bit about the suffrage movement in the US. I had read Women, Race, and Class by Angela Davis when I was in college and that book went into great detail about the complexity of the movement. What I loved about this book was that it did not shy away from discussing Elizabeth Cady Stanton’s racism nor did it try to justify it. The author writes, “To I received this book for free from the publisher (Viking Children’s Books) in exchange for an honest review. Prior to reading this book I knew quite a bit about the suffrage movement in the US. I had read Women, Race, and Class by Angela Davis when I was in college and that book went into great detail about the complexity of the movement. What I loved about this book was that it did not shy away from discussing Elizabeth Cady Stanton’s racism nor did it try to justify it. The author writes, “To justify her racism as simply ‘commonplace’ for her time ignores the fact that there was nothing commonplace about her at all. Stanton, one of the true heroes of this story, was deeply flawed and sadly wrong when it came to matters of race” (63-64). Sprinkled throughout the book are little sidebars with biographies of key women and other facts pertaining to the movement. I found these to be incredibly insightful and helpful in explaining the movement. This book is middle-grade (the recommended age is 10 and up) and I think it did a great job describing the history of the suffrage movement in an easy-to-follow way. Everything was explained in kid friendly language, so this book is perfect for the intended age group. Overall, this book is a perfect introduction to the women’s suffrage movement that doesn’t sugar coat the truth.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Natalie

    The title says it all! I thought this book was perfect. It gave a clear, concise, and fun history of the women's suffrage movement in the United States. My book is jam packed with baby post-its because I want to use this book to make an awesome Nearpod history lesson for the my fifth graders. The story starts with Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony. It talks about the movement they helped grow and how it broke into factions. Decades of hard work and disappointment followed until Lucreti The title says it all! I thought this book was perfect. It gave a clear, concise, and fun history of the women's suffrage movement in the United States. My book is jam packed with baby post-its because I want to use this book to make an awesome Nearpod history lesson for the my fifth graders. The story starts with Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony. It talks about the movement they helped grow and how it broke into factions. Decades of hard work and disappointment followed until Lucretia Mott and Alice Paul led the movement home. I loved learning about these strong, motivated, inspired women. I know that things aren't perfect now but they're a helluva a lot better thanks to these amazing women. Excellent book, highly recommended.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Brittany

    I received this ARC from a local book-seller. So, I actually found this book fascinating and well-researched. However, as someone who teaches sixth grade and us a deep understanding of their reading and processing abilities as well as background knowledge, the intended audience for this book should be high school (at the youngest). The vocabulary and historical conceptions are definitely above the "10 years" labeled on the back cover. Aside from that, I loved the mini-biographies implanted within t I received this ARC from a local book-seller. So, I actually found this book fascinating and well-researched. However, as someone who teaches sixth grade and us a deep understanding of their reading and processing abilities as well as background knowledge, the intended audience for this book should be high school (at the youngest). The vocabulary and historical conceptions are definitely above the "10 years" labeled on the back cover. Aside from that, I loved the mini-biographies implanted within the story for context. The book flowed very well for nonfiction, too.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Chrissy Adams

    As we get closer to the 100th anniversary of women’s suffrage in 2020 I have to stop and think: Wow! On one hand, it’s been almost 100 years since women won the right to vote. But on the other hand, wow, it hasn’t even been 100 years. There is so much I didn’t know about the movement. I’ve always known when the amendment (the “Susan B. Anthony Amendment”) was ratified, but I didn’t realize it was a 72 year battle and that it took 40 years to actually go to the floor for a vote in Congress. I als As we get closer to the 100th anniversary of women’s suffrage in 2020 I have to stop and think: Wow! On one hand, it’s been almost 100 years since women won the right to vote. But on the other hand, wow, it hasn’t even been 100 years. There is so much I didn’t know about the movement. I’ve always known when the amendment (the “Susan B. Anthony Amendment”) was ratified, but I didn’t realize it was a 72 year battle and that it took 40 years to actually go to the floor for a vote in Congress. I also didn’t realize the conflict that was had with the minority suffrage movement following the Civil War, the delay caused by WWI or the fact that the Equal Rights Amendment has yet to be ratified for the federal constitution (as of 2017, 36 states do have such amendments in their own constitutions; see http://www.equalrightsamendment.org/s...). I learned so much from this short book. But it’s useful and interesting history and the tactics of the many women who worked for this important cause. This is a great book for everyone but is well written for high schoolers.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Alina Karapandzich

    An excellent chapter book introduction to history of the fight for women's right to vote, beginning in the mid 19th century and the Seneca Falls, detailing the different women and organizations involved in the 70 plus year fight to vote ending with the 19th amendment in 1919/1920. The author does do an okay job of exposing racism on behalf of the white female suffragettes. However, the author could have done a better job exposing the long-term implications of what that racism within the suffrage An excellent chapter book introduction to history of the fight for women's right to vote, beginning in the mid 19th century and the Seneca Falls, detailing the different women and organizations involved in the 70 plus year fight to vote ending with the 19th amendment in 1919/1920. The author does do an okay job of exposing racism on behalf of the white female suffragettes. However, the author could have done a better job exposing the long-term implications of what that racism within the suffragette movement would have on black women/WOC in the U.S. until this day. This is definitely a book for probably a 6th grader or older, with some difficult terminology and language and the fact that a lot of information is thrown at you. I enjoyed the sprinkling of original photographs of different activists throughout the book. Overall, it gives a good overview of the fight for votes and has some decent synopses on different "radicals" sprinkled throughout.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Kari

    This is written like a middle school textbook, but since I never had a textbook that covered women’s suffrage, I thought it was great.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Shira

    Everyone should read this book!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Richie Partington

    Richie’s Picks: ROSES AND RADICALS: THE EPIC STORY OF HOW AMERICAN WOMEN WON THE RIGHT TO VOTE by Susan Zimet, Viking, January 2018, 168p., ISBN: 978-0-451-47754-5 “The history of mankind is a history of injuries and usurpations on the part of man toward woman, having in direct object the establishment of an absolute tyranny over her. To prove this, let facts be submitted to a candid world.” --from the Declaration of Sentiments, drafted by Elizabeth Cady Stanton and adopted at the Seneca Falls Wom Richie’s Picks: ROSES AND RADICALS: THE EPIC STORY OF HOW AMERICAN WOMEN WON THE RIGHT TO VOTE by Susan Zimet, Viking, January 2018, 168p., ISBN: 978-0-451-47754-5 “The history of mankind is a history of injuries and usurpations on the part of man toward woman, having in direct object the establishment of an absolute tyranny over her. To prove this, let facts be submitted to a candid world.” --from the Declaration of Sentiments, drafted by Elizabeth Cady Stanton and adopted at the Seneca Falls Women’s Convention (1848) “Man is, or should be, woman’s protector and defender. The natural and proper timidity and delicacy which belongs to the female sex evidently unfits it for many of the occupations of civil life...The paramount destiny and mission of woman are to fulfill the noble and benign offices of wife and mother. This is the law of the Creator.” -- U.S. Supreme Court Justice Joseph P. Bradley, concurring in Bradwell v. Illinois (1873) “I would not object to marriage if it were not that women throw away every plan and purpose of their own life, to conform to the plans and purposes of a man’s life.” -- Susan B. Anthony “There are many definitions of ‘sexism,’ but all of them describe discrimination against a group of people--almost always women--based on their sex. Sexism is a prejudice that is often ingrained and institutionalized. And in nineteenth century America the belief that men were superior to women ran very deep, so deep that most people--men and women--didn’t think twice about it; they simply assumed that a society in which women had fewer rights than men was ‘just the way things are.’ Put differently, sexism was so prevalent in the United States in 1852 that there wasn’t even a word for it. Indeed, the word ‘sexism’ wouldn’t become widely used until the 1960s! But maybe that shouldn’t come as a surprise. After all, we don’t have a term for living in a world in which gravity is always at work. Why would we? It’s just the way things are. But Susan B. Anthony refused to accept the way things were. In 1853 she left the temperance movement and joined forces with Elizabeth Cady Stanton to battle this thing so huge, so widespread, and so common it didn’t even have a name. Their historic alliance would last more than half a century and change the United States forever.” Women getting the right to vote in America may seem to some young people like ancient history. But it’s not so! For people my age, 1920 is the same distance in the past as is the Reagan administration to my preschool grandkids. And, from my point of view, those eight years of Reagan are not all that long ago. What now seems like a medieval concept--women having no input into the laws under which they are governed; and husbands having immense power over their wives’ behavior and finances--was the state of affairs into which my grandmothers were born. My Italian-immigrant grandmother Rosa was already a 36 year-old mom when women finally won the right to vote. “Why, you may be asking, did all this take so incredibly long?” poses author Susan Zimet. “Why was opposition to women’s suffrage so difficult to overturn? How could so many people deny women this basic right for so long?” What Ms. Zimet shows in ROSES AND RADICALS is that it was--and is--a matter of sexism: “These women were fighting for more than just the right to vote; they were challenging the basic status of women in the United States...The very way people thought about women--at home, at work, in schools, and in government--had to change...Suffrage activists had to fight for every last one of these changes and each one took time. In truth, considering that women still on average earn less than men for doing the same work, or the fact that only one out of every five US senators is a woman, it is clear that the larger struggle continues today.” There are several widely-known American suffragettes. ROSES AND RADICALS delves deep into the lives and works of Susan B. Anthony, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and Alice Paul. But the author makes it clear that throughout the course of American history there have been so many more women playing pivotal roles in battling the sexism that still keeps the 51 percent from fully enjoying the same rights as men. Among the characters we meet here are Anne Hutchinson; Abigail Adams; Lucretia Mott; Mary Wollstonecraft; Amelia Bloomer; the Grimké sisters; Sojourner Truth; Lucy Stone; Victoria Woodhull; Matilda Joslyn Gage; Carrie Chapman Catt; Lucy Burns; Inez Milholland; and Ida B. Wells. One of the most fascinating and shocking aspects of the story is the racism attributed to some of these important women. Many of them had a big blind spot and bought into the notion that black Americans were inherently inferior because of their race. In clear, honest, and memorable terms, ROSES AND RADICALS presents a history of women in America seeking and fighting for the same inalienable rights that their male counterparts were guaranteed under the Constitution. Author Susan Zimet does this in a manner that makes it readily accessible to middle school kids. With the 2020 centennial rapidly approaching, this is an important book to have and to know. Richie Partington, MLIS Richie's Picks http://richiespicks.pbworks.com https://www.facebook.com/richiespicks/ [email protected]

  9. 4 out of 5

    Glen

    I won this book in a goodreads drawing. Extremely shallow history of the struggle for women's suffrage. It doesn't even start at the right point in time. It doesn't discuss the differences between suffragists and suffragettes. I think the author knocked it off over a long weekend. I actually gave her an extra star for the mini bios. Skip it, and get a real history book. I won this book in a goodreads drawing. Extremely shallow history of the struggle for women's suffrage. It doesn't even start at the right point in time. It doesn't discuss the differences between suffragists and suffragettes. I think the author knocked it off over a long weekend. I actually gave her an extra star for the mini bios. Skip it, and get a real history book.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Heidi

    In a relatively short number of pages, Zimet manages to tell seventy years of history relating to the women's suffrage movement. A topic like this one could be very dry and boring but in Zimet's hands it turns out to be a fascinating and frustrating tale. The focus is of course on the key players in the movement, but a number of radical women of the time are highlighted throughout the book including: Anne Hutchinson, Abigail Adams, Mary Wollstonecraft, and Sojourner Truth. I appreciated how thei In a relatively short number of pages, Zimet manages to tell seventy years of history relating to the women's suffrage movement. A topic like this one could be very dry and boring but in Zimet's hands it turns out to be a fascinating and frustrating tale. The focus is of course on the key players in the movement, but a number of radical women of the time are highlighted throughout the book including: Anne Hutchinson, Abigail Adams, Mary Wollstonecraft, and Sojourner Truth. I appreciated how their efforts contributed to the work that was done later by Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, Lucy Stone, and those who followed them. The movement wasn't successful because of the efforts of any one woman, but those individuals who were leaders are followed especially closely. I also appreciated the fact that different perspectives were included in the story and that the flaws of those involved were not glossed over. This is history-telling at it's finest and a compelling tale of the determination and courage of those who fought for a right that many never lived to see. It reminds me of the importance of using that right to make a difference.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Traci

    From an anti-slavery convention in England on June 12, 1840 to the certification of the Nineteenth Amendment on August 26, 1920, the author tells the story of how women won the right to vote. Sections entitled “Know Your Radicals” & “Putting it in Perspective” are sprinkled throughout the book & give readers insight into important information that isn’t covered in the main narrative. After 70 plus years, Tennessee became the 36th state to ratify the Nineteenth Amendment by a vote of 49-47. Befor From an anti-slavery convention in England on June 12, 1840 to the certification of the Nineteenth Amendment on August 26, 1920, the author tells the story of how women won the right to vote. Sections entitled “Know Your Radicals” & “Putting it in Perspective” are sprinkled throughout the book & give readers insight into important information that isn’t covered in the main narrative. After 70 plus years, Tennessee became the 36th state to ratify the Nineteenth Amendment by a vote of 49-47. Before the vote long time suffragist Carrie Chapman Catt said, “Ratification in Tennessee will go through the work and actions of men, and the great motive that will finally put it through will be political and nothing else. We have long since recovered from our previous faith in the actions of men based upon a love of justice. That is an animal that doesn’t exist.” Readers will learn more about Catt and many other women who endured oppression, degradation, and physical violence to ensure that women would have the right to vote.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Nancy

    When I think of the history of women's suffrage and the 19th amendment, the first thing that comes to mind is the schoolhouse rock ditty that celebrates it. Even as a woman who is very involved in voter education and registration, I have failed to fully comprehend how protracted and how difficult the battle to win the right of women to vote was in this country. Thank you to Susan Zimet for covering this important topic in such a clear and engaging manner. I will never again enter the voting boot When I think of the history of women's suffrage and the 19th amendment, the first thing that comes to mind is the schoolhouse rock ditty that celebrates it. Even as a woman who is very involved in voter education and registration, I have failed to fully comprehend how protracted and how difficult the battle to win the right of women to vote was in this country. Thank you to Susan Zimet for covering this important topic in such a clear and engaging manner. I will never again enter the voting booth without a period of thanks and appreciation to the legions of women who battled for me to do so. Roses and Radicals and other books that champion the history we do not adequately honor, should be part of required reading for all students. We should all reflect upon and value the efforts of the multitudes that came before us and fought for our freedoms. They were hard won and we should respect these rights by making sure that we fulfill them ourselves and continue to protect the rights of all.

  13. 4 out of 5

    S.

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I'm so glad this book exists--a children's book about U. S. suffragists. Such a book didn't exist when I was a kid learning white male supremacist history in school. I don't think I knew about Elizabeth Cady Stanton until after I went to college. Imagine coming across this book when you're a kid--I would have sought out more books on women's history. Spoilers: I did quibble starting page 58 (right after the Civil War), because the author kept using the erroneous "African Americans vs. women, as th I'm so glad this book exists--a children's book about U. S. suffragists. Such a book didn't exist when I was a kid learning white male supremacist history in school. I don't think I knew about Elizabeth Cady Stanton until after I went to college. Imagine coming across this book when you're a kid--I would have sought out more books on women's history. Spoilers: I did quibble starting page 58 (right after the Civil War), because the author kept using the erroneous "African Americans vs. women, as though black women don't exist. It's true the book quotes Stanton pointing out this issue--the way people generally talked at this time pitted white women and black men against each other and ignored black women. However, I'm sticking with 5 stars because I'm impressed with how the book addresses the later suffragists. I didn't even know all the disturbing details about how suffragists were tortured in prison. Even the film _Iron-Jawed Angels_ didn't cover as much as this book does.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Yapha

    The amount I didn't know about the fight for women's voting rights and the American suffrage movement astonishes me. This overview covers the 70+ years of the movement, starting with Elizabeth Cady Stanton's attending of the World Anti-Slavery Congress in 1840. It highlights the key players in the movement, and pulls no punches when it comes to their own biases and racism. It details the torture and abuses that many of the women marching and picketing faced, including hunger strikes and forced f The amount I didn't know about the fight for women's voting rights and the American suffrage movement astonishes me. This overview covers the 70+ years of the movement, starting with Elizabeth Cady Stanton's attending of the World Anti-Slavery Congress in 1840. It highlights the key players in the movement, and pulls no punches when it comes to their own biases and racism. It details the torture and abuses that many of the women marching and picketing faced, including hunger strikes and forced feedings. After reading this book, I will never take my right to vote for granted again. Highly recommended for grades 5 & up.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Mrs. Kenyon

    In today’s political arena, a woman’s voice is heard just as loud as a man’s voice, but we have had this right for less than one hundred years. The nineteenth amendment that gave women the right to vote barely passed, yet it did. This historic event was not quick and was spearheaded by many women over many decades. Roses and Radicals tells the story of these women. Some are well-known suffragettes and others are lesser known, but not less important. This non-fiction book will bring readers a bet In today’s political arena, a woman’s voice is heard just as loud as a man’s voice, but we have had this right for less than one hundred years. The nineteenth amendment that gave women the right to vote barely passed, yet it did. This historic event was not quick and was spearheaded by many women over many decades. Roses and Radicals tells the story of these women. Some are well-known suffragettes and others are lesser known, but not less important. This non-fiction book will bring readers a better knowledge of these issues we take for granted. Roses and Radicals is a good book that readers may finish quickly or at their own pace.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jen

    A fantastic glimpse into the history of American Women and our fight for suffrage. I got emotional several times reading this, thinking of my sisters of the past and all they went through to get the right to vote, the right to own property, and rights to their children. What an incredible fight. One that the author acknowledges is not over. I was inspired and grateful that this book addressed they hard truths of the fight for suffrage: the abuse and the neglect. I must advise: this is a brief his A fantastic glimpse into the history of American Women and our fight for suffrage. I got emotional several times reading this, thinking of my sisters of the past and all they went through to get the right to vote, the right to own property, and rights to their children. What an incredible fight. One that the author acknowledges is not over. I was inspired and grateful that this book addressed they hard truths of the fight for suffrage: the abuse and the neglect. I must advise: this is a brief history, not in-depth. But it never claimed to be anything else. So if you want to be inspired, read this.

  17. 5 out of 5

    NovelNancy

    I read this book as it is the school-wide read at the h.s. where I teach. It was chosen since this is the 100th anniversary since the nineteenth amendment was passed and women were given the right to vote. This is written in an understandable and interesting way and I’d recommend this to anyone. Women fought for the right to vote for 70 years before it finally was passed into law! We need to remember this as we continue to fight for important causes; ideas don’t change overnight, but if you beli I read this book as it is the school-wide read at the h.s. where I teach. It was chosen since this is the 100th anniversary since the nineteenth amendment was passed and women were given the right to vote. This is written in an understandable and interesting way and I’d recommend this to anyone. Women fought for the right to vote for 70 years before it finally was passed into law! We need to remember this as we continue to fight for important causes; ideas don’t change overnight, but if you believe in an injustice, it’s worth changing.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    Great overview of the women's suffrage movement. Written for young adults, but adults would also greatly benefit from learning history that is all-too-often ignored or glossed over. Zimet skillfully talks about the conflicts within the movement about what the right approach was (radical vs. incremental change). I appreciate how she handles the women's suffrage movement's complex relationship to the abolitionist movement and movements for the rights of African-Americans. Great overview of the women's suffrage movement. Written for young adults, but adults would also greatly benefit from learning history that is all-too-often ignored or glossed over. Zimet skillfully talks about the conflicts within the movement about what the right approach was (radical vs. incremental change). I appreciate how she handles the women's suffrage movement's complex relationship to the abolitionist movement and movements for the rights of African-Americans.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Vicky

    Brings to light the incredibly long journey it was to secure women's voting rights. In the one chapter devoted to the topic in my HS history text book, I don't remember anything about how much jail time and abuse those women endured for the right to vote. Great book that shows the number of people, organizations, and perseverance needed for even basic societal change. Brings to light the incredibly long journey it was to secure women's voting rights. In the one chapter devoted to the topic in my HS history text book, I don't remember anything about how much jail time and abuse those women endured for the right to vote. Great book that shows the number of people, organizations, and perseverance needed for even basic societal change.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Nikki

    A forgotten history that everyone should read. The book is written for teens, and helpfully defines certain words and terms. A few repetitive phrases were slightly distracting, especially the overuse of "in other words." A forgotten history that everyone should read. The book is written for teens, and helpfully defines certain words and terms. A few repetitive phrases were slightly distracting, especially the overuse of "in other words."

  21. 4 out of 5

    Sesana

    Quick, fairly comprehensive, and doesn't gloss over the less savory aspects of the early women's movement. Quick, fairly comprehensive, and doesn't gloss over the less savory aspects of the early women's movement.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Ms. Yingling

    Personal Copy Good to have for history day projects. I wish my students loved nonfiction as much as I do! I'll see if I can push it. Personal Copy Good to have for history day projects. I wish my students loved nonfiction as much as I do! I'll see if I can push it.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Becca

    Such a fascinating, accessible collection on the journey of American women winning the right to vote, as well as a taste of the efforts and participants in other lands. This battle spanned generations. The journey was long, messy, courageous, difficult, inspiring, controversial, creative, tragic, strategic, uniting, dividing, miraculous, and in the end, a right I cherish came to pass. By far, my most favorite and 5 Star portion of this book came in the final chapter! One final state needed to ra Such a fascinating, accessible collection on the journey of American women winning the right to vote, as well as a taste of the efforts and participants in other lands. This battle spanned generations. The journey was long, messy, courageous, difficult, inspiring, controversial, creative, tragic, strategic, uniting, dividing, miraculous, and in the end, a right I cherish came to pass. By far, my most favorite and 5 Star portion of this book came in the final chapter! One final state needed to ratify the 19th amendment and the chances of such a motion passing were dim. All efforts had been put to Tennessee, the state where they felt they at least had a chance. Carrie Chapman Catt, who had had 30 decades of experience in activism, was left with one final "thing we can do...We can pray." The following day, one legislator, expected to be anti-suffrage, voted to not table the measure, as was presented by the Speaker. His recorded motion brought the vote to "table" to a tie, keeping suffrage alive. Then, the vote on the amendment was called, with the suffragists believing they would lose by 1-2 votes. But when the vote came to 24-year-old Harry Burn, a miracle happened. He was from Mouse Creek. A Tennessee farm town not known for its support of this women's movement. He wore a red rose, suggesting his anti-suffragist leanings. But that morning, he had received an incredible note from his mother, which he carried in his pocket. "Hurrah, and vote for suffrage! Don't keep them in doubt. I notice some of the speeches against. They were bitter. I have been watching to see how you stood, but have not noticed anything yet. Don't forget to be a good boy...Your Mother." When the vote came to Burn, he voiced a barely audible "Aye." The vote passed, 49-47. Tennessee was the 36th state to ratify the 19th Amendment. I love that a woman's prayer, a man's motion, and a mother and her son helped tip the scale.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Cristi Nelson

    I learned SO much! Very interesting listen, definitely made me appreciate all the hard working women and the sacrifices they made!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Carmela Villarreal

    Easy reading

  26. 4 out of 5

    Margaret Robbins

    Super helpful for understanding the women’s suffrage movement, which I will soon teach!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Susan Zimet

    Press for Roses and Radicals In 2018, Roses and Radicals was named to the Books for Youth Editors' Choice List, and in 2019, it was named a Notable Social Studies Trade Book for Young People. "This book’s supercharged introduction comes out of the gate swinging." — New York Times "Never melodramatic, this is a timely, eye-opening history." — Kirkus Reviews "[A] compact composite portrait of the women who fought to secure voting rights for women." — Publishers Weekly "Readers will be captivated from begi Press for Roses and Radicals In 2018, Roses and Radicals was named to the Books for Youth Editors' Choice List, and in 2019, it was named a Notable Social Studies Trade Book for Young People. "This book’s supercharged introduction comes out of the gate swinging." — New York Times "Never melodramatic, this is a timely, eye-opening history." — Kirkus Reviews "[A] compact composite portrait of the women who fought to secure voting rights for women." — Publishers Weekly "Readers will be captivated from beginning to end." — School Library Journal "This book would provide excellent support for a middle school social studies curriculum and will appeal to students who are interested in history." — VOYA "'Roses and Radicals' is full of parallels linking our past to our present, reminding us how far we’ve come and how far we have to go. It’s a history lesson aimed at young readers, but it sure schooled me... Grab a copy of the book." — Chicago Tribune "While the book is aimed at middle school boys and girls to encourage them to get involved and speak out on issues important to them, it is relevant to everyone." — Times Herald Record "It’s an exhilarating read, breezily written in language that neither talks down nor bogs down. — HV1 "It’s perfect for readers of all ages!" — HelloGiggles "'Roses And Radicals' Is An Explainer On Women's Suffrage For Young Girls — But It's A Must-Read For All Feminists" — Bustle “In Roses and Radicals: The Epic Story of How American Women Won the Right to Vote Susan Zimet powers through many decades of history, focusing on the central roles of Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony and Alice Paul but also highlighting the work of such agitators as Mary Wollstonecraft, Sojourner Truth and Matilda Joslyn Gage." — Washington Post “The historical context is explained clearly, and the authors don't sugarcoat the harsh realities of the fight. Sidebars--including "Putting It in Perspective" discussions (e.g., "Racism and Suffrage") and "Know Your Radical" profiles of lesser-known activists--help complete this useful chronicle of the movement.” — Horn Book Guide Reviews “With the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment being celebrated in 2020, this is a timely, accessible, and unflinching look at the fight to give women the vote. Roses and Radicals packs a lot of history into 168 pages, but it's filled with memorable personalities, and numerous sidebars break up what might otherwise be heavy historical going for some reader.” — Common Sense Media

  28. 4 out of 5

    Marquisha

    The book roses and radicals is about women in the ninteenth century. It starts in 1840 and talks about the influence women had on slavery, womens rights, wars and much more. The book talks about Abigal Adams, Ann Hutchinson, Susan B. Anthony and many more women. The book goes through the effects women had on slavery, different activist groups during the war, womens voice in the declaration of independence and womens voice in their right to vote. This books is written in a narrrative way in that i The book roses and radicals is about women in the ninteenth century. It starts in 1840 and talks about the influence women had on slavery, womens rights, wars and much more. The book talks about Abigal Adams, Ann Hutchinson, Susan B. Anthony and many more women. The book goes through the effects women had on slavery, different activist groups during the war, womens voice in the declaration of independence and womens voice in their right to vote. This books is written in a narrrative way in that it reads like a story of one womans life then introduces each women slowly and talks about the changes going on in the world during these times. The book highlights different religious groups coming up in history during the ninteenth century and different anti- slavery groups. It address different presidents and how their wives affected their term. This book can be used in the reading classroom as a read aloud or to be read for individual readers it doesn't have instances for students to practice voice but gives students the ability to practice reading informational texts in a less structured way. This book could be used for a history element and students could create a timeline from the information given in the book. I could see this book aligning with the state standards and being used to describe the relationship between a series of historical events, scientific ideas or concepts. Overall I think this book is a good read for the classroom because women are not talked about enough in history from my perspective we know the story of Paul River and John Adams but not many people hear of the female radicals throughout history. I would use this book as a book student could choose to read from my library.I might suggest this book to students doing book reports. I wouldnt choose this book as a read aloud because it may not appeal to all students and is more informational. I would use this book in a 5-8 grade classroom.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Barbara

    Today we take women's suffrage for granted, but as this book demonstrates, the road to gaining the right to vote was a long and winding one. In its pages, readers will find various heroes and villains and note that it took more than 70 years of advocacy before the passage of the Nineteenth Amendment granting women suffrage in the United States. Beginning with the attendance of Elizabeth Cady Stanton at the World Anti-Slavery Convention in London in 1840 and concluding with the amendment's passag Today we take women's suffrage for granted, but as this book demonstrates, the road to gaining the right to vote was a long and winding one. In its pages, readers will find various heroes and villains and note that it took more than 70 years of advocacy before the passage of the Nineteenth Amendment granting women suffrage in the United States. Beginning with the attendance of Elizabeth Cady Stanton at the World Anti-Slavery Convention in London in 1840 and concluding with the amendment's passage in 1920 and Alice Paul's efforts to get the Equal Rights Amendment ratified by thirty-eight states, the book covers this historical period thoroughly, highlighting various influential individuals in sections called "Know Your Radicals." The price many of these determined women--and men too!--paid for their dedication to this cause is illustrated over and over again. Not only is this history provided in an accessible, easy to read fashion, but author Susan Zimet is a careful, fair historian, viewing the movement not through starry eyes but describing successes and failures as well as the racism that existed within the movement at times. And while it is clear that the path of abolitionists and suffragists were often parallel, there were also large differences between the movements. As a woman and a feminist, I was riveted and reminded once again not to take the power of the ballot and my ability to cast my one vote lightly. The archival photos and references and personal stories add even more interest in reading this book as well as others related to this monumental effort to change the hearts and minds of a nation and its leaders. And it all might not have been necessary had John Adams, future President of the country and one of the architects of the Declaration of Independence, listened to the entreaties of his wife, Abigail.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Cindy Mitchell *Kiss the Book*

    Roses and Radicals: The Epic Story of How Amercican Women Won the Right to Vote by Susan Zimet. 149 pages. NON-FICTION. Viking (Penguin), 2018. $20. Language: G; Mature Content: G; Violence: PG. BUYING APPEAL: MS, HS – ADVISABLE. KID APPEAL: LOW. In 1840, a World Anti-Slavery Convention was held in London which was attended by Elizabeth Cady Stanton. That convention had rules that women had to sit in a separate gallery than the men and that didn’t sit right with Elizabeth Stanton, so she slowly Roses and Radicals: The Epic Story of How Amercican Women Won the Right to Vote by Susan Zimet. 149 pages. NON-FICTION. Viking (Penguin), 2018. $20. Language: G; Mature Content: G; Violence: PG. BUYING APPEAL: MS, HS – ADVISABLE. KID APPEAL: LOW. In 1840, a World Anti-Slavery Convention was held in London which was attended by Elizabeth Cady Stanton. That convention had rules that women had to sit in a separate gallery than the men and that didn’t sit right with Elizabeth Stanton, so she slowly became involved in fighting for women’s rights. Over time, as the anti-slavery movement grew, it became obvious that there were many rights women didn’t have as well. Women were not protected by any laws and their property was considered their husband’s property. Women were also denied entrance to most schools and jobs. This book follows the strong women who pushed the Women’s Rights Movement until women were eventually given the right to vote. I found this historical account fascinating. The history starts with Elizabeth Cady Stanton in 1840 and ends with the women’s right to vote in 1920, but throughout there are little biographies of the many women who helped gain rights for women. The text is dense, but well done and I couldn’t put it down. This could be used in a classroom to supplement lessons and history lovers will enjoy it, but I’m not sure the average student will pick it up and dive in. C. Peterson https://kissthebook.blogspot.com/2018...

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