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Excerpt from On the Organization of Scientific Work of the General Government, Vol. 2: Additional Statements Mr. Colonna states, confirming my previous estimate to the Commis sion, that such topography would cost at least 0 100 per square mile. The area of the United States, including Alaska, is three and a half million square miles, and a map of the United States construct Excerpt from On the Organization of Scientific Work of the General Government, Vol. 2: Additional Statements Mr. Colonna states, confirming my previous estimate to the Commis sion, that such topography would cost at least 0 100 per square mile. The area of the United States, including Alaska, is three and a half million square miles, and a map of the United States constructed on such a plan would therefore cost 0350, 000, 000. These bare statements show that it would be utterly unwise to attempt such an enterprise. Again, if the map were constructed on such a scale, its utility to the people would be very little, because of its unwieldy proportions. Four hundred thousand sheets would be required for such a map, and the atlas would be a library of large folio volumes. Again, I think I have clearly shown that the topographic system adopted, because of the amount of cultural features presented thereon, would speedily become obsolete, so that every few years a resurvey would become necessary, and the maintenance of such a map would cost many millions of dollars annually. Again, I think that I have shown to the Commission that the features usually shown upon the coast charts are not such as should be shown upon a map of the interior; that the cultural features should be largely omitted, and that the natural features should be more clearly delineated in order that the map may serve the best purposes. Again, I have shown to the Commission that the scale for the interior map adopted by the Geological Survey is substantially the same, or nearly the same, as that adopted by other civilized countries; that the experience of all Europe, after the expenditure of hundreds of millions of dollars, has clearly demonstrated that maps of about the scale adopted in the United States are most useful and practicable. The scale in France for the general topographic map is 810 000; Great Britain, 1: 63 India, 1: 253 Germany, 1: Russia, 1: and so on. In the United States the scale is 1: for some parts of the country, 1: 125, 000 for other parts, and 1: for still other parts, the scale varying for reasons heretofore set forth. The vast ex pe ence of the world In this matter ought to be of some value to us. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.


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Excerpt from On the Organization of Scientific Work of the General Government, Vol. 2: Additional Statements Mr. Colonna states, confirming my previous estimate to the Commis sion, that such topography would cost at least 0 100 per square mile. The area of the United States, including Alaska, is three and a half million square miles, and a map of the United States construct Excerpt from On the Organization of Scientific Work of the General Government, Vol. 2: Additional Statements Mr. Colonna states, confirming my previous estimate to the Commis sion, that such topography would cost at least 0 100 per square mile. The area of the United States, including Alaska, is three and a half million square miles, and a map of the United States constructed on such a plan would therefore cost 0350, 000, 000. These bare statements show that it would be utterly unwise to attempt such an enterprise. Again, if the map were constructed on such a scale, its utility to the people would be very little, because of its unwieldy proportions. Four hundred thousand sheets would be required for such a map, and the atlas would be a library of large folio volumes. Again, I think I have clearly shown that the topographic system adopted, because of the amount of cultural features presented thereon, would speedily become obsolete, so that every few years a resurvey would become necessary, and the maintenance of such a map would cost many millions of dollars annually. Again, I think that I have shown to the Commission that the features usually shown upon the coast charts are not such as should be shown upon a map of the interior; that the cultural features should be largely omitted, and that the natural features should be more clearly delineated in order that the map may serve the best purposes. Again, I have shown to the Commission that the scale for the interior map adopted by the Geological Survey is substantially the same, or nearly the same, as that adopted by other civilized countries; that the experience of all Europe, after the expenditure of hundreds of millions of dollars, has clearly demonstrated that maps of about the scale adopted in the United States are most useful and practicable. The scale in France for the general topographic map is 810 000; Great Britain, 1: 63 India, 1: 253 Germany, 1: Russia, 1: and so on. In the United States the scale is 1: for some parts of the country, 1: 125, 000 for other parts, and 1: for still other parts, the scale varying for reasons heretofore set forth. The vast ex pe ence of the world In this matter ought to be of some value to us. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.

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