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Excerpt from A Comparison of Artificial and Natural Gastric Digestion: Together With a Study of the Diffusibility of Proteoses and Peptone Methods employed. The apparatus employed was similar to that used by Lea1 in his experiments with saliva, except that it was considerably larger, and hence capable of holding a much larger quantity of fluid. It consisted of a glass cylind Excerpt from A Comparison of Artificial and Natural Gastric Digestion: Together With a Study of the Diffusibility of Proteoses and Peptone Methods employed. The apparatus employed was similar to that used by Lea1 in his experiments with saliva, except that it was considerably larger, and hence capable of holding a much larger quantity of fluid. It consisted of a glass cylinder 19 inches high and 5 inches in diameter, with a capacity of about 5 litres, having a small tubulure near the bottom, into which was fitted by means of a rubber cork a long glass tube with a stopcock by which the contents of the vessel could be drawn off at will. During the experiment, this cylinder was filled With dilute hydrochloric acid of the same strength as that contained in the artificial gastric juice, while in the acid fluid was suspended a loop of parchment paper tube2 within which were placed the pepsin-hydrochloric acid and the proteid to be digested. This cylinder was fitted into a larger cylinder of glass 20 inches high and 8 inches in diameter, of 17 litres capacity, the space between the two cylinders being filled in with water which was kept at a constant temperature of 38�c. By a current of heated water, which in turn was kept fairly constant by being passed through a long coiled pipe or worm immersed in water of a higher temperature. In this manner, after a little practice, the temperature of the fluids in the inner cylinder; i.e., the digestive mixture in the parchment tube and the surrounding fluid into which the products of digestion diffused, was kept quite constant at 38� 0. Further, when desired a peristaltic-like movement could be communicated to the contents of the parchment tube by connecting it with a motor by means of a cord, as suggested by Lea. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.


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Excerpt from A Comparison of Artificial and Natural Gastric Digestion: Together With a Study of the Diffusibility of Proteoses and Peptone Methods employed. The apparatus employed was similar to that used by Lea1 in his experiments with saliva, except that it was considerably larger, and hence capable of holding a much larger quantity of fluid. It consisted of a glass cylind Excerpt from A Comparison of Artificial and Natural Gastric Digestion: Together With a Study of the Diffusibility of Proteoses and Peptone Methods employed. The apparatus employed was similar to that used by Lea1 in his experiments with saliva, except that it was considerably larger, and hence capable of holding a much larger quantity of fluid. It consisted of a glass cylinder 19 inches high and 5 inches in diameter, with a capacity of about 5 litres, having a small tubulure near the bottom, into which was fitted by means of a rubber cork a long glass tube with a stopcock by which the contents of the vessel could be drawn off at will. During the experiment, this cylinder was filled With dilute hydrochloric acid of the same strength as that contained in the artificial gastric juice, while in the acid fluid was suspended a loop of parchment paper tube2 within which were placed the pepsin-hydrochloric acid and the proteid to be digested. This cylinder was fitted into a larger cylinder of glass 20 inches high and 8 inches in diameter, of 17 litres capacity, the space between the two cylinders being filled in with water which was kept at a constant temperature of 38�c. By a current of heated water, which in turn was kept fairly constant by being passed through a long coiled pipe or worm immersed in water of a higher temperature. In this manner, after a little practice, the temperature of the fluids in the inner cylinder; i.e., the digestive mixture in the parchment tube and the surrounding fluid into which the products of digestion diffused, was kept quite constant at 38� 0. Further, when desired a peristaltic-like movement could be communicated to the contents of the parchment tube by connecting it with a motor by means of a cord, as suggested by Lea. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.

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