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Civil War in Texas and New Mexico Territory

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"There is enough detail to give the reader a clear understanding of the war in the far west, which tends to be a forgotten subject." --Civil War Courier Did you know that eleven days before Fort Sumter, South Carolina, was fired upon, the Civil War had already begun in Texas? The Civil War in the West has not been the focus of much attention, but it was the location of fierce "There is enough detail to give the reader a clear understanding of the war in the far west, which tends to be a forgotten subject." --Civil War Courier Did you know that eleven days before Fort Sumter, South Carolina, was fired upon, the Civil War had already begun in Texas? The Civil War in the West has not been the focus of much attention, but it was the location of fierce fighting and stormy conflicts. Not everyone wanted to secede from the Union, although between sixty and seventy thousand Texans volunteered to take up arms. Sam Houston, governor of the territory in 1861, opposed secession and was forced out after the legislature approved it. Texas troops proceeded to conquer the New Mexico Territory (all of the present-day states of New Mexico and Arizona) for the Confederacy. The war was all the more difficult in the West, because they had a unique problem: defending themselves from hostile Native Americans and Mexican bandits while also fighting the Federal forces. Many skirmishes were fought against those enemies. This exciting volume tells all about the war in Texas and New Mexico Territory: the intense combat, the brilliant strategies, and the heroic soldiers who fought for their homeland.


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"There is enough detail to give the reader a clear understanding of the war in the far west, which tends to be a forgotten subject." --Civil War Courier Did you know that eleven days before Fort Sumter, South Carolina, was fired upon, the Civil War had already begun in Texas? The Civil War in the West has not been the focus of much attention, but it was the location of fierce "There is enough detail to give the reader a clear understanding of the war in the far west, which tends to be a forgotten subject." --Civil War Courier Did you know that eleven days before Fort Sumter, South Carolina, was fired upon, the Civil War had already begun in Texas? The Civil War in the West has not been the focus of much attention, but it was the location of fierce fighting and stormy conflicts. Not everyone wanted to secede from the Union, although between sixty and seventy thousand Texans volunteered to take up arms. Sam Houston, governor of the territory in 1861, opposed secession and was forced out after the legislature approved it. Texas troops proceeded to conquer the New Mexico Territory (all of the present-day states of New Mexico and Arizona) for the Confederacy. The war was all the more difficult in the West, because they had a unique problem: defending themselves from hostile Native Americans and Mexican bandits while also fighting the Federal forces. Many skirmishes were fought against those enemies. This exciting volume tells all about the war in Texas and New Mexico Territory: the intense combat, the brilliant strategies, and the heroic soldiers who fought for their homeland.

27 review for Civil War in Texas and New Mexico Territory

  1. 5 out of 5

    Corey

    Good coverage of the western theatre and how the Confederacy hope to control the west: Colorado and California but abandoned the plan after defeats in New Mexico and Arizona. Col. Chivington and the Colorado regiment outmaneuvered Confederate Texas troops at Glorietta Pass destroying their supplies and forcing a retreat that resulted in disastrous lack of food and water and many deaths traveling through the infamous Jornado del muerto back to El Paso. The Texans then made the 700 mile return to San A Good coverage of the western theatre and how the Confederacy hope to control the west: Colorado and California but abandoned the plan after defeats in New Mexico and Arizona. Col. Chivington and the Colorado regiment outmaneuvered Confederate Texas troops at Glorietta Pass destroying their supplies and forcing a retreat that resulted in disastrous lack of food and water and many deaths traveling through the infamous Jornado del muerto back to El Paso. The Texans then made the 700 mile return to San Antonio putting an early conclusion to fighting in the New Mexico territory. Sibley and Canby were the most prominent leaders for each side, but Kit Carson served throughout the war after years as trapper, indian fighter, and explorer of the west.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Fredrick Danysh

    Most writings about the American Civil War center on the conflicts in the Eastern and Middle South. Little has been done about Texas and the Rocky Mountain region. Few are aware that Confederate forces from Texas tried to conquer the American Southwest and gain control of California's gold fields. This work covers that phase of the war.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Bohnhoff

    A quick, fun, and informative read. Mr. Cottrell has a great voice, which brings humor and immediacy to some distant events, and the pen and ink drawings are a nice touch, especially the beautiful cartography. This is a good resource for anyone who wants to know more about the Southwest during the Civil War.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jeff

  5. 4 out of 5

    Chris K

  6. 4 out of 5

    Bill Gatlin

  7. 4 out of 5

    Fredrick

  8. 4 out of 5

    Ted Greiner

  9. 5 out of 5

    David Crow

  10. 5 out of 5

    Joe Owen

  11. 4 out of 5

    Joseph burrell

  12. 5 out of 5

    Ben

  13. 5 out of 5

    Tom

  14. 4 out of 5

    Edward

  15. 5 out of 5

    Nathan Zimmermann

  16. 4 out of 5

    Rocky Farr

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jean

  18. 5 out of 5

    zeos386sx

  19. 5 out of 5

    Daniel

  20. 5 out of 5

    Obsidian

  21. 4 out of 5

    Igrowastreesgrow

  22. 4 out of 5

    Dylan

  23. 5 out of 5

    Stanislav

  24. 5 out of 5

    Reuben

  25. 4 out of 5

    Yinzadi

  26. 5 out of 5

    Joseph burrell

  27. 5 out of 5

    Mark D Cummings

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