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Percy Blysshe Shelley (1792 - 1822) was a major English Romantic poet who was considered to be the greatest lyric poet in the English language. His major works were long visionary poems including, Alastor, The Revolt of Islam, Prometheus Unbound and the unfinished The Triumph of Life. Shelley was a strong advocate for social justice for the 'lower classes'. He witnessed ma Percy Blysshe Shelley (1792 - 1822) was a major English Romantic poet who was considered to be the greatest lyric poet in the English language. His major works were long visionary poems including, Alastor, The Revolt of Islam, Prometheus Unbound and the unfinished The Triumph of Life. Shelley was a strong advocate for social justice for the 'lower classes'. He witnessed many of the mistreatments occurring in the domestication and slaughtering of animals and he became a fighter for the rights of all living things. This collection contains On Love, On Life in a Future State, On the Punishment of Death Speculations, On Metaphysics Speculations, On Morals on the Literature, the Arts and the Manners of the Athenians, On the Symposium, or Preface to the Banquet of Plato, and A Defence of Poetry.


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Percy Blysshe Shelley (1792 - 1822) was a major English Romantic poet who was considered to be the greatest lyric poet in the English language. His major works were long visionary poems including, Alastor, The Revolt of Islam, Prometheus Unbound and the unfinished The Triumph of Life. Shelley was a strong advocate for social justice for the 'lower classes'. He witnessed ma Percy Blysshe Shelley (1792 - 1822) was a major English Romantic poet who was considered to be the greatest lyric poet in the English language. His major works were long visionary poems including, Alastor, The Revolt of Islam, Prometheus Unbound and the unfinished The Triumph of Life. Shelley was a strong advocate for social justice for the 'lower classes'. He witnessed many of the mistreatments occurring in the domestication and slaughtering of animals and he became a fighter for the rights of all living things. This collection contains On Love, On Life in a Future State, On the Punishment of Death Speculations, On Metaphysics Speculations, On Morals on the Literature, the Arts and the Manners of the Athenians, On the Symposium, or Preface to the Banquet of Plato, and A Defence of Poetry.

30 review for A Defence of Poetry and Other Essays

  1. 4 out of 5

    Yeda Salomão

    Alguns comentários sobre a morte e a poesia foram muito interessantes. Os questionamentos sobre a onipotência de Deus e as críticas a religião foram ótimos e precisos(*sua opinião sobre o ateísmo causou sua expulsão de Oxford*).

  2. 4 out of 5

    Tessa

    *For College* Pretty good, I must say. Shelley writes beautifully, it made me curious to read actual poems from him. "Poetry is indeed something divine. It is at once the centre and circumference of knowledge." "Poetry is the record of the best and happiest moments of the happiest and best minds." "Poetry thus makes immortal all that is best and most beautiful in the world." "The mind is its own place, and in itself can make a Heaven of Hell, a Hell of Heaven." *For College* Pretty good, I must say. Shelley writes beautifully, it made me curious to read actual poems from him. "Poetry is indeed something divine. It is at once the centre and circumference of knowledge." "Poetry is the record of the best and happiest moments of the happiest and best minds." "Poetry thus makes immortal all that is best and most beautiful in the world." "The mind is its own place, and in itself can make a Heaven of Hell, a Hell of Heaven."

  3. 5 out of 5

    Adam

    The language and the tone reminded me of a mix between Virginia Woolf’s objectiveness and Oscar Wilde’s polemicism. Shelley flirts between being nuanced and making wild unsubstantiated claims. Nonetheless, it as a thrilling read that I much enjoyed. Shelley was so progressive for his time and my favourite essays were those on atheism and metaphysics. His defense of poetry essay was average. Whilst making some interesting points it was too exaggerated and he overstated how amazing and all economp The language and the tone reminded me of a mix between Virginia Woolf’s objectiveness and Oscar Wilde’s polemicism. Shelley flirts between being nuanced and making wild unsubstantiated claims. Nonetheless, it as a thrilling read that I much enjoyed. Shelley was so progressive for his time and my favourite essays were those on atheism and metaphysics. His defense of poetry essay was average. Whilst making some interesting points it was too exaggerated and he overstated how amazing and all econompassing poetry. Very decent essays, yet nothing entirely new and both the language and content are a little out of date.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Rosie

    I have no idea what to rate this nor what I should say about his essays. I went into this knowing a little about Percy, and he interested me greatly so I thought I would give his essays a try and they didn't disappoint. He presents his ideas nicely and I found myself agreeing with quite a few things (when I wasn't struggling with what on earth he was going on about, because it was the 1800s and the way they worded things confuses me sometimes). It was a good read if you're interested in Percy! I have no idea what to rate this nor what I should say about his essays. I went into this knowing a little about Percy, and he interested me greatly so I thought I would give his essays a try and they didn't disappoint. He presents his ideas nicely and I found myself agreeing with quite a few things (when I wasn't struggling with what on earth he was going on about, because it was the 1800s and the way they worded things confuses me sometimes). It was a good read if you're interested in Percy!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth Bennett

    The freedom of women produced the poetry of sexual love. Love became a religion, the idols of whose worship were ever present

  6. 4 out of 5

    Carolina

    I think I may have to read this one a few more times to come to a definite conclusion, but one read caused me to question a number of ideas expressed here. First of all, it seemed there was no difference whatsoever between style and poetry to Shelley. Shelley refers Plato and Lord Bacon as poets because their language possessed a certain rhythm. Where does style end and poetry begin? Secondly, he also states poetry needs moral. I think it's an interesting idea, even if something that never occurre I think I may have to read this one a few more times to come to a definite conclusion, but one read caused me to question a number of ideas expressed here. First of all, it seemed there was no difference whatsoever between style and poetry to Shelley. Shelley refers Plato and Lord Bacon as poets because their language possessed a certain rhythm. Where does style end and poetry begin? Secondly, he also states poetry needs moral. I think it's an interesting idea, even if something that never occurred to me. Lastly, the idea that caused me most confusion was when he expressed his opinion on which poetry is the center and boundaries of knowledge. As much as I appreciate (love, even) poetry, I cannot see it like that. I agree poetry is a unique way to look to the world, a fresh, beautiful, individual perspective; but I don't see it as the basis of knowledge. Imagination, however, is something very different. To sum up, I really enjoyed this reflection, but I think Shelley may have gotten a little carried away (passions tend to have that effect on people). However, I must say I admire him very much, for this essay shows just how dedicated and passioned he was about poetry. I'll be reading more from him for now on.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Lynda

    "Poetry is indeed something divine." and "Poetry is a mirror which makes beautiful that which is distorted." - Well, that says pretty much all about it, doesn't it? "Poetry is indeed something divine." and "Poetry is a mirror which makes beautiful that which is distorted." - Well, that says pretty much all about it, doesn't it?

  8. 5 out of 5

    Marcus Lira

    Although he's not famous for his philosophical stances, it's interesting to see how British empiricism and continental idealism were deeply intertwined in his thoughts. Although he's not famous for his philosophical stances, it's interesting to see how British empiricism and continental idealism were deeply intertwined in his thoughts.

  9. 5 out of 5

    H

    fading coal, spirit of the age... "poets are the unacknowledged legislators of the world." fading coal, spirit of the age... "poets are the unacknowledged legislators of the world."

  10. 4 out of 5

    Tasha Golden

  11. 5 out of 5

    Joshua McKay Powell

  12. 4 out of 5

    Noel Williams

  13. 4 out of 5

    jennet wheatstonelllsl

  14. 4 out of 5

    Laura

  15. 5 out of 5

    Carrie

  16. 4 out of 5

    MarikaRebetissa

  17. 5 out of 5

    Steve Morrison

  18. 5 out of 5

    Michael

  19. 4 out of 5

    Meghan

  20. 4 out of 5

    Matthew Schembri

  21. 5 out of 5

    Christopher Hill

  22. 4 out of 5

    Alexandria

  23. 5 out of 5

    Olivia

  24. 4 out of 5

    Lauren

  25. 5 out of 5

    Camila Nogueira Nardelli

  26. 5 out of 5

    Marianne

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jill

  28. 5 out of 5

    Sanamacha

  29. 4 out of 5

    Charles McMullen

  30. 5 out of 5

    Madly Jane

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