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What if the real key to a richer and more fulfilling career was not to create and scale a new start-up, but rather, to be able to work for yourself, determine your own hours, and become a (highly profitable) and sustainable company of one? Suppose the better—and smarter—solution is simply to remain small? This book explains how to do just that. Company of One is a refreshin What if the real key to a richer and more fulfilling career was not to create and scale a new start-up, but rather, to be able to work for yourself, determine your own hours, and become a (highly profitable) and sustainable company of one? Suppose the better—and smarter—solution is simply to remain small? This book explains how to do just that. Company of One is a refreshingly new approach centered on staying small and avoiding growth, for any size business. Not as a freelancer who only gets paid on a per piece basis, and not as an entrepreneurial start-up that wants to scale as soon as possible, but as a small business that is deliberately committed to staying that way. By staying small, one can have freedom to pursue more meaningful pleasures in life, and avoid the headaches that result from dealing with employees, long meetings, or worrying about expansion. Company of One introduces this unique business strategy and explains how to make it work for you, including how to generate cash flow on an ongoing basis. Paul Jarvis left the corporate world when he realized that working in a high-pressure, high profile world was not his idea of success. Instead, he now works for himself out of his home on a small, lush island off of Vancouver, and lives a much more rewarding and productive life. He no longer has to contend with an environment that constantly demands more productivity, more output, and more growth.   In Company of One, Jarvis explains how you can find the right pathway to do the same, including planning how to set up your shop, determining your desired revenues, dealing with unexpected crises, keeping your key clients happy, and of course, doing all of this on your own.


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What if the real key to a richer and more fulfilling career was not to create and scale a new start-up, but rather, to be able to work for yourself, determine your own hours, and become a (highly profitable) and sustainable company of one? Suppose the better—and smarter—solution is simply to remain small? This book explains how to do just that. Company of One is a refreshin What if the real key to a richer and more fulfilling career was not to create and scale a new start-up, but rather, to be able to work for yourself, determine your own hours, and become a (highly profitable) and sustainable company of one? Suppose the better—and smarter—solution is simply to remain small? This book explains how to do just that. Company of One is a refreshingly new approach centered on staying small and avoiding growth, for any size business. Not as a freelancer who only gets paid on a per piece basis, and not as an entrepreneurial start-up that wants to scale as soon as possible, but as a small business that is deliberately committed to staying that way. By staying small, one can have freedom to pursue more meaningful pleasures in life, and avoid the headaches that result from dealing with employees, long meetings, or worrying about expansion. Company of One introduces this unique business strategy and explains how to make it work for you, including how to generate cash flow on an ongoing basis. Paul Jarvis left the corporate world when he realized that working in a high-pressure, high profile world was not his idea of success. Instead, he now works for himself out of his home on a small, lush island off of Vancouver, and lives a much more rewarding and productive life. He no longer has to contend with an environment that constantly demands more productivity, more output, and more growth.   In Company of One, Jarvis explains how you can find the right pathway to do the same, including planning how to set up your shop, determining your desired revenues, dealing with unexpected crises, keeping your key clients happy, and of course, doing all of this on your own.

30 review for Company of One: Why Staying Small Is the Next Big Thing for Business

  1. 5 out of 5

    Melanie

    Unfortunately, this book was not what I expected, and I ended up skimming the last half of the book. Paul Jarvis argues that companies do not have to constantly scale, nor have a growth mindset, nor add employees. Individuals can be "companies of one," outsourcing or hiring contractors when they need to, but effectively keeping their companies small and manageable while still being successful. This might make for an easier, happier life, especially balancing work with a personal life. I couldn't Unfortunately, this book was not what I expected, and I ended up skimming the last half of the book. Paul Jarvis argues that companies do not have to constantly scale, nor have a growth mindset, nor add employees. Individuals can be "companies of one," outsourcing or hiring contractors when they need to, but effectively keeping their companies small and manageable while still being successful. This might make for an easier, happier life, especially balancing work with a personal life. I couldn't agree more with all of this, which is why I bought the book. However, it's pretty clear from the beginning Jarvis is not talking about freelancers like me; he says freelancers—those who receive money for a service—aren't getting paid unless they're working. Instead, he's focusing on people who create products. But I disagree: There are tactics freelancers can use to get paid when not working, such as seeking retainers with anchor clients, subcontracting work, etc. I had hoped this book would be more tactical, but it spends 200 pages going into detail about his initial hypothesis, explaining over and over the "company of one" concept. While the numerous company examples are interesting, they seem to be only about wealthy, large "companies of one," not small business or freelancers. I also found little to no applicable advice. At only 200 pages, the book feels too long and needed an editor. I had hoped this book would provide concrete tips and systems I could put into place today, but I didn't find any takeaways that piqued my interest.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Annie

    I give this book 3.5 stars. The author lives in Canada where healthcare is affordable and becoming self-employed or starting a small business can be a realizable dream. In the US where the cost of healthcare insurance is outrageous, it would be risky to quit a corporate job to be your own boss. Some of the tips are good whether you're self-employed or have a side gig (like finding your purpose, listening to customers, creating better products, and building trust in your brand). The main point is I give this book 3.5 stars. The author lives in Canada where healthcare is affordable and becoming self-employed or starting a small business can be a realizable dream. In the US where the cost of healthcare insurance is outrageous, it would be risky to quit a corporate job to be your own boss. Some of the tips are good whether you're self-employed or have a side gig (like finding your purpose, listening to customers, creating better products, and building trust in your brand). The main point is to stay small and agile so that you can continue creating better products. When demand for your products go up, you charge more until demand levels off to the amount of work you can handle as a small business. Don't make the mistake of becoming preoccupied with growing the company (which comes with increased debt, complexity, and bureaucracy). Ultimately, it leads to losing touch with customers and getting surpassed by smaller, agile competitors who are making better products.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jordan

    I finished *Company of One*. This book seems to be a series of affirmations about starting and running a small business online. Its central argument is that small businesses are more nimble and can care more about their customers, and this is both good for profit, good for the psychological wellbeing of the owner, and good for society as a whole. I agree with this. If you care about this space at all you’ve read almost everything in this book already when you read Jason Fried and DHH’s books. Whi I finished *Company of One*. This book seems to be a series of affirmations about starting and running a small business online. Its central argument is that small businesses are more nimble and can care more about their customers, and this is both good for profit, good for the psychological wellbeing of the owner, and good for society as a whole. I agree with this. If you care about this space at all you’ve read almost everything in this book already when you read Jason Fried and DHH’s books. Which you should read. They were making most of these arguments 15 years ago in blog posts and magazine articles. So when, at the end of *Company of One*, the writer says he used to feel like he alone held these values until he embarked on the project of writing the book, I don’t believe him. (The author was a web developer, and every successful web developer in the West has heard of and been influenced by the two aforementioned folks.) Most of the book seems to be some declaration of a value, like how being small means you can focus more on your existing customers and not on growth or scaling, followed by an example. The examples are where things fall apart for me. He profiles some real charlatans: someone whose webpage pitches how you won’t understand why your customer buys things unless you understand their brain (and pay to ask him and his undergraduate degree in psychology questions about that), someone who created a kind of alternative MBTI-astrology for people in business leadership, and a few people whose method of making money is arranging sponsored content masquerading as personal writing and marketing it all as a personal blog. This is not motivating. More than half of his examples are of people who are just lying about their authority within a domain to people who—while they command lots of capital—don’t know any better. He also uses a lot of examples from companies that are not mere “companies of one.” Basecamp has 50 employees. Buffer has 72. He puts the behavior of Buffer on a pedestal throughout the book, while the premise of the book is to avoid getting that big in the first place, because being that big means you can’t do the things the book says are valuable about being small. So it all kind of falls apart. While Basecamp can talk a lot about how everyone should aspire to “lifestyle” businesses (e.g., ones that profit in order to afford a certain lifestyle for the owner, and not aspire to much more—note that this includes things like “I want to employ people at a living wage”), they still employ 50 people and make somewhere north of 20MM a year in profit. That is not a mere lifestyle business. But there were some redeeming qualities, particularly as far as affirmations go. It never hurts me to hear that I should stop focusing on researching a product or planning some feature for something that doesn’t exist yet. I get motivated when I hear—almost independent of the source—that I need to just make and release the thing, that I need to interview potential customers, that I need to quickly get the thing in front of people and iterate. That’s useful and helpful. So the book isn’t worthless. This book reminds me a lot of *Authority*, which is not a great thing.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Poornima Vijayashanker

    Paul Jarvis does a great job of highlighting the importance of why we need to question growth as it relates to our both our personal and professional goals. Throughout the book, Jarvis offers examples and alternatives to commonly held beliefs around building, running, and leading a company. The Company of One doesn’t mean to be prescriptive or claim that there is only one way of doing business. Rather it’s building awareness for what is changing, and how those changes could help you. For example, Paul Jarvis does a great job of highlighting the importance of why we need to question growth as it relates to our both our personal and professional goals. Throughout the book, Jarvis offers examples and alternatives to commonly held beliefs around building, running, and leading a company. The Company of One doesn’t mean to be prescriptive or claim that there is only one way of doing business. Rather it’s building awareness for what is changing, and how those changes could help you. For example, if you are looking for more flexibility and freedom, you could work remotely or you could build a lifestyle business. Highly recommend reading for anyone who is trying to figure out what success in business looks like for them.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Adii Pienaar

    Must-read! Finished the book with so many new ideas and new energy to build a business in a new way. We need more of this!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Tiago

    Important milestone This book tied together a lot of recent ideas and trends, from digital minimalism to Marie Kondo, that have in common a simpler and more intentional view of what constitutes success and happiness. This book questions perhaps the deepest and most fundamental assumption of business: that growth is an unmitigated good. And that growth at all costs is the unquestionable premise of all business. That’s not the case anymore, and Jarvis has done a fantastic job making the case for so Important milestone This book tied together a lot of recent ideas and trends, from digital minimalism to Marie Kondo, that have in common a simpler and more intentional view of what constitutes success and happiness. This book questions perhaps the deepest and most fundamental assumption of business: that growth is an unmitigated good. And that growth at all costs is the unquestionable premise of all business. That’s not the case anymore, and Jarvis has done a fantastic job making the case for solopreneurship not as a stepping stone, but as a goal in itself. Highly recommended read for anyone pursuing or thinking about pursuing self-employment in any of its diverse forms. You don’t have to sacrifice or trade off anything anymore. This book will show you how.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Mitalee | TheAvidBookerfly

    Key message - Companies of one are small-scale business enterprises that purposefully stay small in order to provide their owners with a sustainable income, a high degree of independence and a healthy work-life balance. Freelancing can be a good stepping stone to starting such an enterprise, and you can develop one by leveraging the power of a marketable skill set, a niche audience, mutually beneficial relationships, simplicity, personality, technology and great customer service. Actionable advic Key message - Companies of one are small-scale business enterprises that purposefully stay small in order to provide their owners with a sustainable income, a high degree of independence and a healthy work-life balance. Freelancing can be a good stepping stone to starting such an enterprise, and you can develop one by leveraging the power of a marketable skill set, a niche audience, mutually beneficial relationships, simplicity, personality, technology and great customer service. Actionable advice - Apply the lessons of a Company of One to other areas of business.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

    I didn't find this book flowed well, and while the bullet points at the end were interesting, the rest seemed to drag. The concept of staying small is appealing, but there is a lack of helpful information that can be easily found and applied. Bigger is better is the general premise of most business books, and while this book's goal is staying small, it just felt like it fell short to me.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Yury Chudnovsky

    I've put 5 stars for this book, because it was just in time for me. Together with "It doesn't have to be crazy at work", those two books supported me in my decision to actually start moving towards my personal Company of one.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Nela

    I've been reading articles by Paul Jarvis for years, so I had high expectations for this book – I even pre-ordered it months before release. I got the impression this book was not intended for experienced business owners. Apart from some interesting trivia and research references, there was nothing new mentioned that I haven't already applied in my own business. Paul's definition of a “company of one” is quite different from my definition, and so the majority of the book doesn't apply to the kind I've been reading articles by Paul Jarvis for years, so I had high expectations for this book – I even pre-ordered it months before release. I got the impression this book was not intended for experienced business owners. Apart from some interesting trivia and research references, there was nothing new mentioned that I haven't already applied in my own business. Paul's definition of a “company of one” is quite different from my definition, and so the majority of the book doesn't apply to the kind of business I run (consultancy). I don't remember whether this was communicated in the book marketing, perhaps it really wasn't (which is Paul's fault), or I hadn't paid close enough attention (which is my fault). For someone who is considering starting a business and knows next to nothing about it, this book is a great introduction to figuring out business goals that are sane and meaningful, and getting your feet wet. For me, it was pretty much rehashing of things I've been doing for a long time, and just confirmation that I'm on the right path. That's not what I look for in a full length book. If I'm going to spend so much time with it, I want it to challenge me and inspire me to evolve. Sadly this one didn't do that. P.S. If you read this review Paul, I'm sorry to wreck your rating. I really wanted to like it.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jakub

    What i liked about this book is not about the „American way of doing things”. Its not follow your passion, etc but work smart on small things, decide if you want to grow, if not, it's ok, its not bad. This is not a book about staying small, is about everything, and imo this is misleading. It should end after 100 pages it would be enough. Be creative, best on people, be unique. it's basically a good book about what we can do to have a good life without working in corp. you can be huge but you do What i liked about this book is not about the „American way of doing things”. Its not follow your passion, etc but work smart on small things, decide if you want to grow, if not, it's ok, its not bad. This is not a book about staying small, is about everything, and imo this is misleading. It should end after 100 pages it would be enough. Be creative, best on people, be unique. it's basically a good book about what we can do to have a good life without working in corp. you can be huge but you do not need to have 1 000 empl. however, it is quite too long. and... in can be summarized in: Do not grow if you do not need to, know what you are doing, do not follow a passion, learn and do things that helps you be better at what you want to do, start small, find one client and if he is paying enough and you have few other clients waiting then quit a job. if you have too many clients, raise prices. Be unique, and have human touch with customers, do something nice to them and they will do something nice to you. and use saas. that's it, the whole book. you do not need to buy it now ;)

  12. 4 out of 5

    Osvaldo Santana

    If it's your first book about bootstrap/lifestyle business, you will rate this book with five stars. But it was not my case. This book is kind if a summary of the $100 Startup and ”It doesn't have to be crazy at work.” The intermediate chapters are painfully repetitive and could be pointed as a "list of companies of one." Good parts? The introduction (with references to Ricardo Semler) chapter and the final chapters that gives some essential hints to start a Company of One.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Dennis

    The first part is really inspiring and contains not just justifications for staying small, but also some very good points on why that might put you in a better position. I am a freelance software developer for ten years now and the first part of the book made me even prouder of that, just because it confirms that following your gut feeling and instinct is the right thing to do. The meaning of success is defined by you and chasing the mainstream ideal of evergrowing numbers won‘t necessarily lead The first part is really inspiring and contains not just justifications for staying small, but also some very good points on why that might put you in a better position. I am a freelance software developer for ten years now and the first part of the book made me even prouder of that, just because it confirms that following your gut feeling and instinct is the right thing to do. The meaning of success is defined by you and chasing the mainstream ideal of evergrowing numbers won‘t necessarily lead to your personal goals. The second part of the book is mostly stories and advises to guide your way into becoming a Company of One. Not that I didn‘t like it, but it contained information I already had picked up elsewhere – nevertheless this might be very helpful for people starting out or thinking about going solo. All in all I enjoyed this book and would recommend it to likeminded peers.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jacek Bartczak

    Book plenty of good business tips but none of them is new or spectacular. Or maybe it is about me - in last years I implemented many of those tips or told do so other companies (or I read about them somewhere else). That book may be good for you if: - didn't read much about the business yet - so you need to know basics quickly, - your business knowledge comes from startup's "hustle and grow 10x culture" - so you will get to know the less crazy perspective - you work in business but in a precisely s Book plenty of good business tips but none of them is new or spectacular. Or maybe it is about me - in last years I implemented many of those tips or told do so other companies (or I read about them somewhere else). That book may be good for you if: - didn't read much about the business yet - so you need to know basics quickly, - your business knowledge comes from startup's "hustle and grow 10x culture" - so you will get to know the less crazy perspective - you work in business but in a precisely specialized position - so you will learn how to look at the business from different contexts. I don't think publishing this book in 2019 was necessary - it collects good practices that already spread out.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Martijn Reintjes

    Company of one describes my way of entrepreneurship. I've always been different, as that I don't care about money or working long hours, I care about building cool things that people find useful. It was refreshing to have a lot of my business practices put in some context. Some quotes from the book: - the “company of one” model can be laid out in a similar fashion: “start small, define growth, and keep learning.” - Start out as simple as possible, and always fervently question adding new layers of c Company of one describes my way of entrepreneurship. I've always been different, as that I don't care about money or working long hours, I care about building cool things that people find useful. It was refreshing to have a lot of my business practices put in some context. Some quotes from the book: - the “company of one” model can be laid out in a similar fashion: “start small, define growth, and keep learning.” - Start out as simple as possible, and always fervently question adding new layers of complexity. - Richard Branson summed up purpose nicely: “Success in business is no longer just about making money or moving up the corporate ladder. More and more, one of the biggest indicators of success is purpose.” - Arthur & Henry’s metric for success is sustainability in all forms: earning steady revenues, raising money for charities, minimizing environmental damage, and maximizing benefits to all workers.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Mike Weston

    Enough and better are goals that should characterize our pursuits more than the endless passion growth. Love Jarvis’ challenge to begin with the end in mind and then create an organization with the strategies that allow you accomplish the life you desire.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Gio Lodi

    In Company of One Paul Jarvis challenges the mainstream belief that for a company to be successful it has to grow and keep growing. Companies that question growth, whether made up of a single person like Paul's business, or by many employees like some of the ones profiled in the book, have strategic advantages compared to huge enterprises. No only they can be profitable, but actually thrive in the marketplace. By focusing on serving existing users rather than investing in advertisement and paid a In Company of One Paul Jarvis challenges the mainstream belief that for a company to be successful it has to grow and keep growing. Companies that question growth, whether made up of a single person like Paul's business, or by many employees like some of the ones profiled in the book, have strategic advantages compared to huge enterprises. No only they can be profitable, but actually thrive in the marketplace. By focusing on serving existing users rather than investing in advertisement and paid acquisition, for example, a company of one can develop stronger relationship with its customers, retaining them and increasing their lifetime value. Moreover, happy customers can become the biggest advocates for a service or product. This removes the need for advertisement and paid acquisition, enabling even more focus on serving the existing customers, which creates a virtuous cycle of success and profitability. Small companies have an advantage big ones don't have, they can show the real people behind the business and create an emotional connection with their customers. Moreover, being small means less overhead, which makes it easier to become profitable. A key strategy to resist the need for growth is to create systems and automation to get more done in less time. This requires ingenuity and creativity, which I find intellectually stimulating. Another powerful idea is that you don't need to run a company to be a company of one, you can be one within your own organization. Be the person who can get the job done with less resources, that introduces automation and processes to be more effective, that care about the relationship with the customers. The book is written in an easy to read conversational tone. It never bores with tangents or repetition aimed only to hit the words count. I appreciate how well researched the book is. While the idea of the company of one is based on Paul Jarvis' experience running his own business the majority of the examples and cases in point of the book are from a variety of businesses embodying its principles. I'd recommend Company of One to every business owner, to people considering starting their on businesses, and to anyone who's happy working as an employee but longs for a more impactful and rewarding way of working.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Bálint

    I honestly expected a lot more hands on stuff from Paul, but I understand he saved that up for the accompanying course. Smart move. The book has a lot of stories, quotes, it's a well researched publication, without a lot of original thought. I'm not saying that is a bad thing, it's certainly valuable for business newcomers, but I found very few new things in it (which is of course is not the book's fault. well, no one's really). For me, the power lies in the confirmation - a lot of things I've d I honestly expected a lot more hands on stuff from Paul, but I understand he saved that up for the accompanying course. Smart move. The book has a lot of stories, quotes, it's a well researched publication, without a lot of original thought. I'm not saying that is a bad thing, it's certainly valuable for business newcomers, but I found very few new things in it (which is of course is not the book's fault. well, no one's really). For me, the power lies in the confirmation - a lot of things I've done instinctively have been confirmed. Always nice. Style-wise, it's disturbingly motivational, I barf when I read such things as The first trait that resilient people have is an acceptance of reality. and the like. Apart from that, I would definitely not re-read this book, but I did not regret reading it.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Mark Sylvester

    This book definitely made me re-evaluate a number of assumptions about what I thought a "healthy" business is and should look like. Author presents a broader, much more balanced picture of how growth can and should fit into your life (family, work, hobbies, desired lifestyle, serving customers BETTER vs. serving MORE customers), what steps to take to develop a "company of one" mindset, and questioning growth for growths sake! Definitely against the grain with regard to the current start-up/growt This book definitely made me re-evaluate a number of assumptions about what I thought a "healthy" business is and should look like. Author presents a broader, much more balanced picture of how growth can and should fit into your life (family, work, hobbies, desired lifestyle, serving customers BETTER vs. serving MORE customers), what steps to take to develop a "company of one" mindset, and questioning growth for growths sake! Definitely against the grain with regard to the current start-up/growth hacking cultural narrative.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Nick Hernandez

    Author tries to explain a “company of one” by drawing similarities between solo entrepreneurs and people at companies. I just didn’t get it. If he stuck with solo entrepreneurs being a company of one, the book would have been more on track.

  21. 4 out of 5

    wpschrec

    Really good book on the disadvantages of scaling up your business. Goes into diseconomies of scale and the inefficiencies inherent in the corporation model. Very good

  22. 5 out of 5

    Kieron Botting

    Loved this book. A decent read for anyone in the nervy/early start up phase or someone asking questions about the next moves for growth. Having developed a business in the drinks industry it’s easy to assume that growth has to equal bigger... Bigger venues, bigger teams, bigger/better/more resource tools. At these times there have been many hiccups made by myself. Most often at the acquisition of new sites, with the subsequent scaling up of operation. In our business, growth traditionally hasn’t e Loved this book. A decent read for anyone in the nervy/early start up phase or someone asking questions about the next moves for growth. Having developed a business in the drinks industry it’s easy to assume that growth has to equal bigger... Bigger venues, bigger teams, bigger/better/more resource tools. At these times there have been many hiccups made by myself. Most often at the acquisition of new sites, with the subsequent scaling up of operation. In our business, growth traditionally hasn’t evolved intricately on curves, I’d say more so steps... steps as we make sales jumps, steps as we upgrade and replenish resource. It’s in these steps where the biggest lessons have happened. Generally from over-stretching in following what’s considered conventional wisdom (the done thing!). These growing pains have been very deep, very real... and somewhat two steps forward, one step back, by design! Often causing short term drops in confidence as we navigated similar paths, trying not to replicate the same mistakes over & over & OOOOOVER! This book is refreshing in its outlook to growth and scalability. If anything, in this day an age, I’d say it has an air of wisdom about it that encourages the concept of entrepreneurial flair through the sound vision & control of the businesses maker. This book will not set the world on fire on how to run the intricacies of all business types. However it does run the rule over very strong and sustainable practices that will improve your chances of long term success across all industries. Had this book been made earlier... i (we) May have saved ourselves from a few “were you f*cking mental?!” decisions over the years. I will be re-reading this. It has qualities worth returning to.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Matt

    This book I any easy read with some good information in it. I loved not only his philosophy (“you don’t have to grow big - it’s okay to stay small and have enough”), but also his viewpoint on growing: start with a few small customers and focus on making they’re experience incredible. This not only makes them a customer for life, but also means you’re building a great product that will help you later if you do want to grow bigger. To be honest, a lot of this book was a rehash for me of a variety This book I any easy read with some good information in it. I loved not only his philosophy (“you don’t have to grow big - it’s okay to stay small and have enough”), but also his viewpoint on growing: start with a few small customers and focus on making they’re experience incredible. This not only makes them a customer for life, but also means you’re building a great product that will help you later if you do want to grow bigger. To be honest, a lot of this book was a rehash for me of a variety of other books I’ve read so it got one less star (a lot of this can be found in Slack by Tom DeMarco and The Four Hour Work Week by Tim Ferriss). That said, if you haven’t done a lot of reading on the benefits of creating a lifestyle business (or a great work place), you can’t do much better than this book.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Zoe

    Company of One was required reading for my entrepreneurship class, and I can confidently say that this book is the most actionable AND enjoyable required readings I have ever read. Because of this book, I started my own company of one. I was inspired by how simple Paul Jarvis made starting a business: all you need is to solve a problem for one paying customer. Company of One has a little bit of fluff, but with a more choosy editor, this book would have been five stars. Great stories, great practic Company of One was required reading for my entrepreneurship class, and I can confidently say that this book is the most actionable AND enjoyable required readings I have ever read. Because of this book, I started my own company of one. I was inspired by how simple Paul Jarvis made starting a business: all you need is to solve a problem for one paying customer. Company of One has a little bit of fluff, but with a more choosy editor, this book would have been five stars. Great stories, great practical tips. I took copious notes.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Chris Raastad

    I love this book. Company of one brings to life the ideas brewing I've had brewing about business and companies for a few years now. The main idea is easily digestible in the first chapter: staying small is powerful. There is a way to build a career where your work works around life and life doesn't have to sacrifice for work. 9-5 and salary work does not incentivize productivity, does not incentivize quantifying "enough work is done today" and going home early. This book questions the entire ve I love this book. Company of one brings to life the ideas brewing I've had brewing about business and companies for a few years now. The main idea is easily digestible in the first chapter: staying small is powerful. There is a way to build a career where your work works around life and life doesn't have to sacrifice for work. 9-5 and salary work does not incentivize productivity, does not incentivize quantifying "enough work is done today" and going home early. This book questions the entire venture capital startup mentality. Build an MVPr (minimal viable product with revenue) and you can let your customers dictate your growth. Sometimes growth is not the answer, enough is enough. The author brings many examples of small businesses and companies that grow in this company of one philosophy. The book is a pretty easy read.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Aline

    This book is an introduction to the 'Company of One' concept. I found it interesting and it had some good key informations, but it could have been way shorter. It got a bit bored with all the examples.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Willy Theodorus

    Staying small is the next big thing in business. A good insight for an early start this year. Love it!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Eduards Sizovs

    Great book for freelancers or those who need the motivation to start his/her own business.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Nicholas Kotar

    So good that I got a hardcover copy to write in. Looking forward to diving deep on this one.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Kym

    So many great takeaways in this book to inspire you to slow the growth and expenditure of your company and focus on the service and profitability. Thoroughly enjoyed the tips.

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