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Please Don't Hug Me

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Erin is looking forward to schoolies, at least she thinks she is. But her plans are going awry. She’s lost her job at Surf Shack after an incident that clearly was not her fault, and now she’s not on track to have saved enough money. Her licence test went badly, which was also not her fault: she followed the instructor’s directions perfectly. And she’s missing her brother, Erin is looking forward to schoolies, at least she thinks she is. But her plans are going awry. She’s lost her job at Surf Shack after an incident that clearly was not her fault, and now she’s not on track to have saved enough money. Her licence test went badly, which was also not her fault: she followed the instructor’s directions perfectly. And she’s missing her brother, Rudy, who left almost a year ago. But now that she’s writing letters to him, some things are beginning to make sense. Kay Kerr’s Please Don’t Hug Me depicts life on the cusp of adulthood—and on the autism spectrum—and the complexities of finding out and accepting who you are and what’s important to you.


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Erin is looking forward to schoolies, at least she thinks she is. But her plans are going awry. She’s lost her job at Surf Shack after an incident that clearly was not her fault, and now she’s not on track to have saved enough money. Her licence test went badly, which was also not her fault: she followed the instructor’s directions perfectly. And she’s missing her brother, Erin is looking forward to schoolies, at least she thinks she is. But her plans are going awry. She’s lost her job at Surf Shack after an incident that clearly was not her fault, and now she’s not on track to have saved enough money. Her licence test went badly, which was also not her fault: she followed the instructor’s directions perfectly. And she’s missing her brother, Rudy, who left almost a year ago. But now that she’s writing letters to him, some things are beginning to make sense. Kay Kerr’s Please Don’t Hug Me depicts life on the cusp of adulthood—and on the autism spectrum—and the complexities of finding out and accepting who you are and what’s important to you.

30 review for Please Don't Hug Me

  1. 4 out of 5

    ♠ TABI ♠

    the title of this book is something I want on a t-shirt

  2. 5 out of 5

    Tamsien West (Babbling Books)

    I loved this book! It is a story that so perfectly captures how difficult it is to bee a teenager at the end of high school, grappling with big changes that are universal, but also the specific challenges that the protagonist experiences as an Autistic person. This book reminded me of all the reasons why I am glad that YA fiction in general, and Aussie YA in particular, exists. There are so many ways I saw myself on these pages, and so many more ways that someone who is a neuro-divergent teen mi I loved this book! It is a story that so perfectly captures how difficult it is to bee a teenager at the end of high school, grappling with big changes that are universal, but also the specific challenges that the protagonist experiences as an Autistic person. This book reminded me of all the reasons why I am glad that YA fiction in general, and Aussie YA in particular, exists. There are so many ways I saw myself on these pages, and so many more ways that someone who is a neuro-divergent teen might too. These stories matter. Everyone's story matters. And when it is told with so much compassion, humour and warmth, it is a joy to behold. I also think this is an example of how own-voices stories have real power. There was something about the protagonists internal voice that felt authentic, unflinching, symapthetic, and unapologetic. The take away message was that it's more than ok to be wholly yourself.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Kelly (Diva Booknerd)

    Please Don't Hug Me is compulsory reading. Narrated from the perspective of seventeen year old Erin as she shares her thoughts in a series of letters to her brother Rudy. Rudy was a popular young man and after a disagreement with his parents, escaped the confines of the family home and the expectations of his parents. Five year old Oliver barely remembers his brother, their mother is consumed by keeping her family together while their father searches for understanding at the local tavern, drowni Please Don't Hug Me is compulsory reading. Narrated from the perspective of seventeen year old Erin as she shares her thoughts in a series of letters to her brother Rudy. Rudy was a popular young man and after a disagreement with his parents, escaped the confines of the family home and the expectations of his parents. Five year old Oliver barely remembers his brother, their mother is consumed by keeping her family together while their father searches for understanding at the local tavern, drowning his sorrows in alcohol. Erin is an intelligent and incredible young woman, navigating a neurotypical environment from the perspective of a person on the spectrum and sharing her intimate, analytical, and often tumultuous thoughts on life, love, friends, family and autism. Erin begins her correspondence as she prepares to look for casual employment, leaving her previous position feeling misunderstood and underappreciated, resulting in an outburst. For Erin, feeling emotional and overwhelmed are two instances in which her psychologist encourages her to practice being present in the moment, while Erin keeps a secret list of her indiscretions each day to release her tension and as she enters her final year of school, Rudy is missing her important milestones. Beyond her family, Erin has only confided in two friends of her diagnosis, her best friend since childhood Dee and her boyfriend, the disappointing Mitch. Dee is friendly, created from sunshine and laughter and understands when Erin is feeling overwhelmed, arming herself with doughnuts and waiting on her doorstep. Dee is charming, lighthearted and a young woman also finding her place in the world but her friendship with Erin wasn't always a positive influence on Erin's mental health. Especially at school, allowing her friends to make Erin feel uncomfortable. Her friendship is important to Erin but also restricted her personal growth as she transitioned into adulthood. As Erin begins in her new position at a clothing store predominantly for seniors, she develops a friendship with Agnus, an Indigenous, Quandamooka young woman, musician and activist who endures depression. Aggie is a wonderful influence on Erin, allowing her to guide their friendship so she feels comfortable, offering support and understanding. In comparison to her friendship with Dee, their friendship signified a new and exciting chapter of life for Erin. Throughout her letters, we see Erin grow in confidence, learning to care for herself and others and coping mechanisms. Please Don't Hug Me encourages awareness of those on the spectrum, empathy and the mentality from neurotypical society. Observing our environment through the thoughts of Erin was remarkable and profoundly intimate, navigating social situations, employment, her education and friendships and relationships. It was beautiful, poignant and an incredibly important read, as neurological conditions are rarely discussed in young adult literature. Sincere, unflinching and achingly beautiful, Please Don't Hug Me is an exceptional and remarkable debut

  4. 5 out of 5

    Karys McEwen

    What a perfectly titled book for our times! Please Don't Hug Me is an Own Voices narrative that focuses on Erin, a year 12 student who is autistic. Things are not going to plan: she's lost her part-time job, her driving test went badly and her boyfriend is a bit of an asshole. Mostly though, she's missing her brother Rudy. The story is told through the letters Erin writes Rudy, keeping him up to date on the messiness of her life. This is a perfect coming-of-age story that takes a relatable ride What a perfectly titled book for our times! Please Don't Hug Me is an Own Voices narrative that focuses on Erin, a year 12 student who is autistic. Things are not going to plan: she's lost her part-time job, her driving test went badly and her boyfriend is a bit of an asshole. Mostly though, she's missing her brother Rudy. The story is told through the letters Erin writes Rudy, keeping him up to date on the messiness of her life. This is a perfect coming-of-age story that takes a relatable ride through that journey of finding your place in the world. Older teenagers are bound to fall in love with the story and the writing. Kay Kerr gives authentic insight into the mind of a teenager who is both on the autism spectrum, and on the cusp of adulthood.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Julie (Bookish.Intoxication)

    This was such a unique and refreshing read. I was immediately drawn to it because of the female ASD voice. ASD is something close to my heart and Kerr delivered something so wonderful. A depiction of what its like to live seeing the world differently and not being able to have anyone see it the way you do. I loved the way that this book was delivered. It felt more personal and you could see Erin growing with each new letter. A great read.

  6. 4 out of 5

    K.

    Review to follow

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jaclyn Crupi

    I love good representations of neurodiversity and reading about people who experience and process the world in different ways. I also love book merch and will always be sad I didn’t get a Normal People T-shirt. I did feel the form limited this book a little and I would have loved for a section to break out of the epistolary form. But it provided unique and immediate insights into what it feels like to be an autistic teenager in a neurotypical world and that is incredibly important and much neede I love good representations of neurodiversity and reading about people who experience and process the world in different ways. I also love book merch and will always be sad I didn’t get a Normal People T-shirt. I did feel the form limited this book a little and I would have loved for a section to break out of the epistolary form. But it provided unique and immediate insights into what it feels like to be an autistic teenager in a neurotypical world and that is incredibly important and much needed.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Trisha

    Talking about this on the radio this week. It's a powerful delivery of a great message. With all the feels.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Epstein

    I adored this story about an autistic teenage girl navigating her final few months of high school (and so much more) told in letter form to her absent brother, Rudy. Erin’s honest, authentic voice drew me in as she makes sense of the world through her friends, family, mishaps and new understandings during a significant period of change in her life. A fabulous read! #LoveOzYA

  10. 5 out of 5

    Katherine

    That title

  11. 5 out of 5

    Bec

    I’m guilty of purchasing this book because of its cover and it was a sweet surprise, pun Intended. Each chapter is a letter Erin writes to her brother Rudy. She talks about her days her struggles and missing him. Erin struggles with social interactions, being over stimulated and not reading people as she has autism. I am fascinated with the way her autism causes her to talk things she’s asked to do so literal. Erin went for her licence and the instructor asked her to go through the round about, po I’m guilty of purchasing this book because of its cover and it was a sweet surprise, pun Intended. Each chapter is a letter Erin writes to her brother Rudy. She talks about her days her struggles and missing him. Erin struggles with social interactions, being over stimulated and not reading people as she has autism. I am fascinated with the way her autism causes her to talk things she’s asked to do so literal. Erin went for her licence and the instructor asked her to go through the round about, poor Erin took it literally and mounted the roundabout believing she was doing what she was told to do. At first I thought Rudy has run away, then I thought maybe he was in jail. I just couldn’t pin point why he wasn’t responding to her. Then I figured out was dead. For Erin the emotional journey of loss was far different to most. She felt and saw things so differently. In the end she started having these small breakthroughs and less breakdowns and started to experience things outside of her conform zone knowing she would share every moment with Rudy. The thing I hate more about this brain of mine is how alone it makes me feel. I felt this on a whole other level. This book was magical and everyone will get something out of it. Thanks you for writing and sharing this masterpiece.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    Wow, this was phenomenal. I was expecting a lighthearted, coming of age story, however; this took a much darker turn and hit me right in the feels 😭 This will be sticking with me for many years to come. This was a great #ownvoices debut and I cannot wait to read more from this author. tw: (view spoiler)[ death of a sibling (in the past), drug overdose, drowning, ableism (hide spoiler)] Wow, this was phenomenal. I was expecting a lighthearted, coming of age story, however; this took a much darker turn and hit me right in the feels 😭 This will be sticking with me for many years to come. This was a great #ownvoices debut and I cannot wait to read more from this author. tw: (view spoiler)[ death of a sibling (in the past), drug overdose, drowning, ableism (hide spoiler)]

  13. 4 out of 5

    Poppy Nwosu

    I loved reading this book! It is so moving and the voice is just so immersive. I really sunk into Erin's world and I found it deeply emotional. What a beautiful book. It is almost written like a stream of consciousness, which I really loved, as it truly meant I was able to experience the world from inside Erin's head and truly understand who she is and how she interacts with her surroundings. I don't want to give any spoilers at all, but there was also something at the end that I did not see com I loved reading this book! It is so moving and the voice is just so immersive. I really sunk into Erin's world and I found it deeply emotional. What a beautiful book. It is almost written like a stream of consciousness, which I really loved, as it truly meant I was able to experience the world from inside Erin's head and truly understand who she is and how she interacts with her surroundings. I don't want to give any spoilers at all, but there was also something at the end that I did not see coming and it definitely made me feel very emotional. What a beautiful book! I highly recommend!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Becca Fitzpatrick (bookscandlescats)

    This was one of my most anticipated books of the year, and I have to say that it was even better than I'd hoped! It's an AMAZING coming of age story that I think everyone should read. The protagonist Erin has been diagnosed with autism. I love the openness and reality of living with the condition that we get to experience in letters she has written to her brother. I found myself relating to this story and her thought process in more ways than one. It's a hilarious, relatable and sometimes devasta This was one of my most anticipated books of the year, and I have to say that it was even better than I'd hoped! It's an AMAZING coming of age story that I think everyone should read. The protagonist Erin has been diagnosed with autism. I love the openness and reality of living with the condition that we get to experience in letters she has written to her brother. I found myself relating to this story and her thought process in more ways than one. It's a hilarious, relatable and sometimes devastating novel that I'm so glad to have read. Thank you so much to Text Publishing for sending me a copy of this book to review.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Brittany

    The Unofficial Slogan of 2020, Please Don’t Hug Me by Kay Kerr is a lovely story about a young Australian girl on the brink of finishing high school and heading out into the big wide world. On top of navigating her way through final exams and being able to think about nothing but Schoolies, Erin is on the autism spectrum and experiences the world differently. Aaaaand just when we thought that Erin’s life couldn’t get more complicated, the story is told as letters that she is writing to her older The Unofficial Slogan of 2020, Please Don’t Hug Me by Kay Kerr is a lovely story about a young Australian girl on the brink of finishing high school and heading out into the big wide world. On top of navigating her way through final exams and being able to think about nothing but Schoolies, Erin is on the autism spectrum and experiences the world differently. Aaaaand just when we thought that Erin’s life couldn’t get more complicated, the story is told as letters that she is writing to her older brother Rudy, who left home a year ago and no one has heard from since. Side note for international readers: Schoolies is a holiday that secondary school leavers go on after they’ve finished exams. The most popular destination being Queensland’s Gold Coast, close to where this book is set, but anywhere that you can go with friends and spend days drinking and partying will suffice! I give this book 3.5 stars (4 stars on GoodReads because of no half-star function) and here’s a summary of my favourite parts:  There are a couple of characters who are from minority groups. Erin is on the autism spectrum, and her friend Aggie is a Quandamooka woman. Both characters represent two groups who are under represented in literary works, as well as TV, movies, magazines… basically any media you can think of. It was really refreshing to have these two characters in the novel and experience things through their eyes. There were struggles that were discussed that I wouldn’t have even thought were problematic courtesy of my white privilege. An eye-opener for younger readers.  The format of the novel made it a physically easy read. The story is told through the letters that Erin writes to her brother Rudy. So instead of it being a traditional chapter, each ‘chapter’ (for lack of better word) starts with ‘Dear Rudy’, has a natural narrative flow to it, and then finishes with ‘Love, Erin’. These letters are short and make it easy to get through letters/chapters that aren’t overwhelmingly long. For this reason, it might also be appealing for those who maybe don’t enjoy reading too much or get overwhelmed by long, heavy chapters.  There are some lovely moments where everyone learns something about themselves. Throughout this book, there were so many times that I would come across a sentence that completely and utterly resonated with me and I felt it was written just for me to discover and be touched by. My favourite part was when Erin talks about wearing clothing like armour and that fashion isn’t something that is frivolous and vain. When I read this, I just felt a little bubble of joy in my heart, because it helped me understand something about myself that I was self-conscious about; wearing pretty clothing is my armour! I wear it with pride, and dressing a certain way makes me happy! There are so many other parts of the story that (I hope for others) carry a similar sentiment, and as a reader it’s these little moments which make reading worth it!  It shows a different way of living with grief. Don’t worry, I’m not giving away any spoilers, but Erin and her family are grieving after the sudden change that has happened to their family after Rudy leaves and doesn’t make contact. Their relationships are all altered, no one quite knows how to discuss it with each other, everyone has their own way of coping, and there is strain on her parents’ marriage. These are all very real things that happen when individuals and families are grieving, and in this story, it sort of happens not in the traditional “stages of grief” pattern (despair, bargaining, anger etc.). As much as I enjoyed this book, there’s a couple of other feelings that I had about this story:  I felt that the timeline was too rushed. Whilst I know that learning important life lessons is totally subjective and can’t really be measured, I felt that it all happened a little too quickly for Erin. Erin writes the first letter to her brother in August, and the last letter she sends to him is in November (there is a very brief sort if follow up letter sent in January, which felt more like the conclusion of the story, sort of like an epilogue). In those short 3-4 months, she copes with a horrible experience in the workplace, find a new job and settles into that very easily, has a lot of different thought and plans for what she wants to do after high school (both with Schoolies and continuing her studies), the relationship with her best friend since childhood changes dramatically, she gets another best friend, and she’s still learning to live without her older brother living at home and all of the changing family dynamics that come with that. I felt that it was a lot to pack into four months for a coming-of-age story. I feel like it would’ve been a bit more relatable and believable if it were spread out a bit more over maybe a longer time frame.  Things appear to have worked out a bit too well for Erin Honestly… it was too cliched and fairy-tale. I felt like it should’ve had a bit more drama and more ups and downs than it did. Erin appeared to have learned her lessons too quickly for any teenager going through the amount of turmoil and big life events. For that reason, I felt it was a bit boring and too juvenile for a coming-of-age story to really have any impact and teach the reader a truly valuable lesson that resonates with them after they finish. Overall, a pleasant weekend read. Whilst overall it seemed a bit rushed and a bit too fairy-tale-ish for my liking, there were a couple of great female characters from minority groups as well as some lovely moments for the reader where you find that one sentence that perfectly describes how you feel. Best enjoyed with some fresh cinnamon donuts from Donut King!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Madison

    This is the book that everyone is talking about right now. Honestly, I was on board with the pink cover and cinnamon doughnuts, but bonus points for #ownvoices, local Aussie author, diverse character voice representation and a realistic story about growing up, fitting in and learning that it is okay to be different. Please Don’t Hug Me is written entirely in the form of letters from our main character Erin, to her brother Rudy. We readers don’t know where or why Rudy isn’t at home anymore, but E This is the book that everyone is talking about right now. Honestly, I was on board with the pink cover and cinnamon doughnuts, but bonus points for #ownvoices, local Aussie author, diverse character voice representation and a realistic story about growing up, fitting in and learning that it is okay to be different. Please Don’t Hug Me is written entirely in the form of letters from our main character Erin, to her brother Rudy. We readers don’t know where or why Rudy isn’t at home anymore, but Erin is working through a few things and has been tasked by her therapist to write letters. Through these letters, which include enough dialogue and reflection on events to feel like you are in the middle of each situation, we readers learn about Erin’s friendships, her work, getting through the last year of school, looking forward to things like schoolies, but also feeling out of the loop as she is unable to read social cues or properly fit in with her best-friend’s group of school fiends. A new job, a new friend and working through her feelings about her brother and family, might just be the things she needs to make it through the year. Written by local Sunshine Coast woman, Kay Kerr, Please Don’t Hug Me is OzYA #OwnVoices at its best. Erin is on the autism spectrum, and while writing this book Kay Kerr was learning more about her own autism spectrum diagnosis. Erin’s voice is unique and authentic. She is also completely relatable to everyone who has experienced social anxiety, not fitting in at school or with a particular group of friends or maybe just doesn’t feel comfortable with the mainstream crowd. There are some honestly laugh out loud moments in this book. It is equally heartwarming and heartbreaking. From licence tests that go badly to changes in friendships and the moments at work for which you know you aren’t paid enough. As we learn more about Erin’s family and her brother, a deeper heartbreak and mess of feelings is revealed. Easy to read and enjoy, Please Don’t Hug Me is a delightful book. Find more reviews, reading age guides, content advisory, and recommendations on my blog Madison's Library

  17. 4 out of 5

    Alex

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. ’Please Don’t Hug Me’ is a book I wish I’d had when I was younger! I’m an autistic reader (and fellow writer), so it was very special to me. I’ve also struggled with processing grief, so that hit me hard too. I used to be a lot like Erin in high school — doing things that met other people’s idea of ‘normal’ or ‘fun’, and trying to hide as much as possible until I inevitably reached my melting points. It was an extremely difficult time in my life, so reading this book felt affirming and cathartic. ’Please Don’t Hug Me’ is a book I wish I’d had when I was younger! I’m an autistic reader (and fellow writer), so it was very special to me. I’ve also struggled with processing grief, so that hit me hard too. I used to be a lot like Erin in high school — doing things that met other people’s idea of ‘normal’ or ‘fun’, and trying to hide as much as possible until I inevitably reached my melting points. It was an extremely difficult time in my life, so reading this book felt affirming and cathartic. I’m confident that it’ll give other young people a much-needed boost of solidarity and representation, which can really make all the difference. I think the epistolary form was an effective way for this story to unfold. Although we lose the immediacy of events, we gain so much more in Erin’s reflections. This can sometimes be difficult to achieve without having the protagonist narrate things that they realistically wouldn’t, but here it was a successful and well-executed choice. I also loved how Erin made a new friend in Aggie, but still maintained her connection with Dee as an evolving thing. Sometimes I find that the world contains a lot of messages about “finding your people” as the ultimate salve, which has always made me feel terribly lonely. I really appreciated that Erin was able to acknowledge that she and Dee were both growing, had each made some mistakes, but still had an important relationship — even if they didn’t perfectly understand each other. I liked how some stealthy autism advocacy was woven in, but there were a couple of instances that it felt inorganic — e.g. the mention of Erin’s mother implementing an “autism cure” diet was a darkly comedic stab at people who actually do this, but it felt mismatched to these particular characters and their circumstances. But for the most part, this technique was clever, and will hopefully provide some surreptitious education to readers unfamiliar with ASD. Strongly recommend this book, especially to young people, autistic or otherwise. Thanks so much for writing it, Kay! Definitely going to lend it around!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Lucie Dess

    Please Don’t Hug Me by Kay Kerr is an own voices story about a high functioning autistic girl named Erin. Erin is 17 and in her final year of High School. Please Don’t Hug Me is about the struggles of being a teenager: boys, toxic friendships, family relationships and the fear of finishing high school and being out in the real world. Add what Erin calls outbursts and her Cringe List and you’ve got the perfect coming of age story. The whole book is written as letters from Erin, to her older brothe Please Don’t Hug Me by Kay Kerr is an own voices story about a high functioning autistic girl named Erin. Erin is 17 and in her final year of High School. Please Don’t Hug Me is about the struggles of being a teenager: boys, toxic friendships, family relationships and the fear of finishing high school and being out in the real world. Add what Erin calls outbursts and her Cringe List and you’ve got the perfect coming of age story. The whole book is written as letters from Erin, to her older brother, Rudy. Usually I’m not a fan of this style as my favourite part of a book is the dialogue. Kay Kerr didn’t even let me have a chance to miss dialogue. Erin is quick witted, clever and all round loveable. I fell in love with her from the very first page. Erin was just so relatable. I connected with her on so many levels. Over analysing every little thing she does, being uncomfortable with hugs and not really enjoying the things you’re supposed to as a teenager. This story explores mental health, addiction and dealing with grief. It is also very diverse.  Please Don’t Hug Me needs to be added to the top of your TBR pile. *PSA* you will crave hot cinnamon doughnuts while reading this book!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Ruth Garlick

    Please Don’t Hug Me, by Kay Kerr, is one of the best books in the world. It’s an ownvoices book with an Autistic character, by an Autistic author. Erin is going through her last year at school. She’s writing letters to her older brother, about her thoughts and feelings and what she wants to do. She writes about her days at school, and how confused she feels. She has gathered a whole bunch of rules she thinks the Neurotypicals believe in, but she needs to figure out herself, and what SHE believes Please Don’t Hug Me, by Kay Kerr, is one of the best books in the world. It’s an ownvoices book with an Autistic character, by an Autistic author. Erin is going through her last year at school. She’s writing letters to her older brother, about her thoughts and feelings and what she wants to do. She writes about her days at school, and how confused she feels. She has gathered a whole bunch of rules she thinks the Neurotypicals believe in, but she needs to figure out herself, and what SHE believes in. She needs to figure out being Autistic. This book is desperately sad, but also funny. It is extremely relatable to me, an Autistic girl. I went through those struggles. I thought those thoughts. I felt seen, while reading this book. It made me laugh and cry and scream, and most of all, feel loved and understood. I absolutely love this book, it is brilliant.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Allie

    With Covid happening, I thought this an interesting title that grabbed my attention. I get what the story was trying to achieve, but it just went a bit slow for me. It was in letter form to her brother, which I liked. And kept you wondering what the deal was with the brother. The story touches on community issues and relatable issues in society. But I still didn’t find it a page turner unfortunately

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jane

    There aren't many surprises in the plot or writing of this solid realistic fiction YA. But it stands out for providing a window into the mind of an autistic teen girl. This is so rarely even attempted, and here it feels like the author has completely captured her protagonist. Could be triggering for any ASD girls (or their mums) but should be required reading for teachers and health professionals.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Sean Randall

    Despite having a disability myself, I've never felt comfortable calling myself tolerant, or an expert in anything. So reading this was refreshingly open, with a lot of little things to consider that I wouldn't have even given a second thought. I found the voice compelling, the progression of the story utterly fascinating and the grief, acceptance, and growth painful and wonderful.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Linden

    I'm so happy for this book. Everything about it makes sense. It's the first book that explains grief believably to me, and it also makes me grateful for the people I had around me growing up. Thank God and publishers for #LoveOzYA and #ActuallyAutistic authors. I knew I'd love this book since Kay Kerr spoke about it at the SLV YA Showcase, and I am so glad to be right.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    I read this in one sitting! The writing style is lovely (it's told all in letters and I thought that would annoy me, but it's well done), the perspective is unique and as a Brisbane girl, I'm a sucker for things set in my hometown. Definitely worth checking it out!

  25. 4 out of 5

    biconique

    the fact that this book's cover hasnt been revealed yet is a crime bc that title... and the mini description... are so beautiful... and important..

  26. 5 out of 5

    Tom Riedstra

    If I could, I’d give this book 6 stars. Amazing. And I don’t even like letter-novels!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Hannah

    I have just finished Kay Kerr's excellent book. It was warm, comforting, engaging. Get this book if you want a window into a unique life.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Michelle Keyatta

    Lovely story & very relatable. Enjoyed the 2 mentions of Fleetwood Mac too :) I’d recommend this one! Lovely story & very relatable. Enjoyed the 2 mentions of Fleetwood Mac too :) I’d recommend this one!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Tim

    This is a fantastic debut. Funny and sad, I laughed and cried. I'm now following Kay Kerr, another brilliant Australian writer.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Pam Saunders

    Written in the form of letters to her brother, Erin expresses the frustration she finds as a highly functioning autistic teenager.

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