counter create hit Private Rights and Government Control: Address Delivered at the Annual Meeting of the American Bar Association, Held at Saratoga Springs, N. Y., September 4, 1917 (Classic Reprint) - Download Free eBook
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

Private Rights and Government Control: Address Delivered at the Annual Meeting of the American Bar Association, Held at Saratoga Springs, N. Y., September 4, 1917 (Classic Reprint)

Availability: Ready to download

Excerpt from Private Rights and Government Control: Address Delivered at the Annual Meeting of the American Bar Association, Held at Saratoga Springs, N. Y., September 4, 1917 One Objection to governmental interference with the personal habits, or even the vices, of the individual is that it tends to weaken the effect Of the self-convincing moral standards and to put in the Excerpt from Private Rights and Government Control: Address Delivered at the Annual Meeting of the American Bar Association, Held at Saratoga Springs, N. Y., September 4, 1917 One Objection to governmental interference with the personal habits, or even the vices, of the individual is that it tends to weaken the effect Of the self-convincing moral standards and to put in their place fallible and changing conventions as the test of right conduct, with the consequent loss of the strengthening value to the individual Of the free exercise of his rational choice Of good rather than evil. Enforced discipline can never have the moral value of self-discipline, since it lacks the element of coo crating effort on the part of the individual, which is the very sou of all personal advancement. We may, therefore, well pause to consider whether the benefits which will result to society from a given interference of this character are sufficiently important to compensate for the loss of that fine sense Of personal inde endence which more than any other quality has enabled the Ang o-saxon race to throw Off the yoke of monarchical absolutism and substitute democratic self-government. It must not be forgotten that democracy is after all but a form Of government whose justification must be established in the same way that the justification Of any other form of government is established; namely, by what it does rather than by what it claims to be. The errors of a democracy and the errors of an autocracy will be followed by Similar consequences. A foolish law does not become a wise law Simply be cause it is ap roved by a great many people. The successful enforce ment of the aw in a democracy must always rest primarily in the fact that on the whole it commends itself to a universal sense Of justice, shared even by those who violate it. Any attempt, therefore, to curtail the liberties Of the citizen which shocks the sense of personal independence Of any considerable proportion of the community is likely to do more harm than good, not only because a strong feeling that a particular law is unjust lessens in some degree the reverence for. Law generally, but because such a law can not be successfully enforced, and a law that inspires neither respect for its justice nor fear for its enforcement is about as utterly contempt ible a thing as can be imagined. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.


Compare
Ads Banner

Excerpt from Private Rights and Government Control: Address Delivered at the Annual Meeting of the American Bar Association, Held at Saratoga Springs, N. Y., September 4, 1917 One Objection to governmental interference with the personal habits, or even the vices, of the individual is that it tends to weaken the effect Of the self-convincing moral standards and to put in the Excerpt from Private Rights and Government Control: Address Delivered at the Annual Meeting of the American Bar Association, Held at Saratoga Springs, N. Y., September 4, 1917 One Objection to governmental interference with the personal habits, or even the vices, of the individual is that it tends to weaken the effect Of the self-convincing moral standards and to put in their place fallible and changing conventions as the test of right conduct, with the consequent loss of the strengthening value to the individual Of the free exercise of his rational choice Of good rather than evil. Enforced discipline can never have the moral value of self-discipline, since it lacks the element of coo crating effort on the part of the individual, which is the very sou of all personal advancement. We may, therefore, well pause to consider whether the benefits which will result to society from a given interference of this character are sufficiently important to compensate for the loss of that fine sense Of personal inde endence which more than any other quality has enabled the Ang o-saxon race to throw Off the yoke of monarchical absolutism and substitute democratic self-government. It must not be forgotten that democracy is after all but a form Of government whose justification must be established in the same way that the justification Of any other form of government is established; namely, by what it does rather than by what it claims to be. The errors of a democracy and the errors of an autocracy will be followed by Similar consequences. A foolish law does not become a wise law Simply be cause it is ap roved by a great many people. The successful enforce ment of the aw in a democracy must always rest primarily in the fact that on the whole it commends itself to a universal sense Of justice, shared even by those who violate it. Any attempt, therefore, to curtail the liberties Of the citizen which shocks the sense of personal independence Of any considerable proportion of the community is likely to do more harm than good, not only because a strong feeling that a particular law is unjust lessens in some degree the reverence for. Law generally, but because such a law can not be successfully enforced, and a law that inspires neither respect for its justice nor fear for its enforcement is about as utterly contempt ible a thing as can be imagined. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.

0 review for Private Rights and Government Control: Address Delivered at the Annual Meeting of the American Bar Association, Held at Saratoga Springs, N. Y., September 4, 1917 (Classic Reprint)

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.