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Crisis on Multiple Earths, Vol. 1

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In this prequel to one of DC Comics' biggest hits, the first four team-ups between the Justice League of America and its Earth-Two counterpart, the Justice Society, are collected in this graphic novel, depicting their battles against cosmic, all-powerful menaces too big for either team to handle alone. Full color. Includes material first published in Justice League of Ameri In this prequel to one of DC Comics' biggest hits, the first four team-ups between the Justice League of America and its Earth-Two counterpart, the Justice Society, are collected in this graphic novel, depicting their battles against cosmic, all-powerful menaces too big for either team to handle alone. Full color. Includes material first published in Justice League of America #21, 22, 29, 30, 37, 38, 46 & 47


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In this prequel to one of DC Comics' biggest hits, the first four team-ups between the Justice League of America and its Earth-Two counterpart, the Justice Society, are collected in this graphic novel, depicting their battles against cosmic, all-powerful menaces too big for either team to handle alone. Full color. Includes material first published in Justice League of Ameri In this prequel to one of DC Comics' biggest hits, the first four team-ups between the Justice League of America and its Earth-Two counterpart, the Justice Society, are collected in this graphic novel, depicting their battles against cosmic, all-powerful menaces too big for either team to handle alone. Full color. Includes material first published in Justice League of America #21, 22, 29, 30, 37, 38, 46 & 47

30 review for Crisis on Multiple Earths, Vol. 1

  1. 5 out of 5

    Sophia

    Multiple team-ups of the Justice League of Earth-One and Justice Society of Earth-Two!! There were really interesting stories and I liked the way that each member interacted with the other team members. I also like the fact that this is a good and easy way to read about both the JLA and the JSA in a way that is interesting and has interwoven story lines. Overall, good stories for people that are wanting a JLA and JSA fix!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Charles

    A wonderfully fun romp through history and comics culture! This volume collects the first team ups between the JLA and JSA. The notion of them first crossing over came about in the "Flash of Two Worlds" issue and was brought to fruition in these annual stories. Great, wholesome, and fun stuff! Also, you'll learn of the origin of the Crime Syndicate of America which played a prominent role in the more recent Forever Evil run. Eager to see where things go from here and eventually lead to Crisis on A wonderfully fun romp through history and comics culture! This volume collects the first team ups between the JLA and JSA. The notion of them first crossing over came about in the "Flash of Two Worlds" issue and was brought to fruition in these annual stories. Great, wholesome, and fun stuff! Also, you'll learn of the origin of the Crime Syndicate of America which played a prominent role in the more recent Forever Evil run. Eager to see where things go from here and eventually lead to Crisis on Infinite Earths!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Barbara

    This is the first volume of 1960s DC Comics featuring both the Justice League and the Justice Society of America. Obviously, the stories are from the early to mid 1960s, when comics were bright and happy. The plot(s) range from sublime comedy to outright ridiculousness courtesy of Gardner Fox. For all the cringe-worthy 60s dialogue, there are moments of brilliance and comedy. This volume includes the first appearance of the Crime Syndicate (most are more familiar with Grant Morrison's great JLA This is the first volume of 1960s DC Comics featuring both the Justice League and the Justice Society of America. Obviously, the stories are from the early to mid 1960s, when comics were bright and happy. The plot(s) range from sublime comedy to outright ridiculousness courtesy of Gardner Fox. For all the cringe-worthy 60s dialogue, there are moments of brilliance and comedy. This volume includes the first appearance of the Crime Syndicate (most are more familiar with Grant Morrison's great JLA "Earth-2" story) as well as Johnny Thunder and his djinn, Thunderbolt.

  4. 5 out of 5

    John Parungao

    A nostalgia trip for comic book fans like myself. It reprints the original Justice League/ Justice Society crossovers. Once upon a time these were major events and it was fun reading some of these classics for the first time. My personal favorite was "the world without a Justice League", a story where the villain changed history so that the Silver age heroes of the Justice League never existed. It falls to the Justice Society to masquerade as the heroes of the Justice League and defeat the villa A nostalgia trip for comic book fans like myself. It reprints the original Justice League/ Justice Society crossovers. Once upon a time these were major events and it was fun reading some of these classics for the first time. My personal favorite was "the world without a Justice League", a story where the villain changed history so that the Silver age heroes of the Justice League never existed. It falls to the Justice Society to masquerade as the heroes of the Justice League and defeat the villain.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Don

    Ridiculous in the way only Silver Age comics can be, it's nevertheless notable for starting the JLA/JSA Crisis stories that ran for 20 summers (!) before being done away with in COIE. As a bonus, since this was an era where the prevailing wisdom was that every comic was (possibly) someone's first, you can actually use these stories to introduce someone to the (pre-COIE) DCU fairly well, as it showcases the Golden Age heroes, Silver Age heroes, and (in later volumes) more besides.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Brandt

    I’ve already detailed how Gardner Fox, the creator of the original Flash (Jay Garrick) ended up unintentionally opening a tremendous can of worms when writing for the Silver Age Flash book and decided that he wanted to have the new Flash (created by Robert Kanigher, but obviously influenced by Fox’s original) team up with the one he created in 1940. But at the time Fox wrote “Flash of Two Worlds” no one realized the problems it would create going forward and was in fact quite a clever story that I’ve already detailed how Gardner Fox, the creator of the original Flash (Jay Garrick) ended up unintentionally opening a tremendous can of worms when writing for the Silver Age Flash book and decided that he wanted to have the new Flash (created by Robert Kanigher, but obviously influenced by Fox’s original) team up with the one he created in 1940. But at the time Fox wrote “Flash of Two Worlds” no one realized the problems it would create going forward and was in fact quite a clever story that rendered the Golden Age DC heroes (now dubbed the “Earth Two” heroes) usable again. And the readers absolutely loved it. And like the gorilla phenomenon (gorilla based characters also sold well), if a team-up between two heroes was a big seller, a team-up between superhero teams had to be money in the bank right? Thus was born the annual Justice League of America/Justice Society of America team up. It is in these JLA/JSA team-ups where we get the first glimpse of the issues that would be the motivation behind the proposed “clean-up” of the DC continuity in Crisis on Infinite Earths. The presence of Wonder Woman from the first “Crisis” in Justice League of America #21 and 22 (the first story arc in this volume) should have made Fox realize the quandry he was in. How to explain away a character who was in both the JLA and the JSA? Eventually it meant that there were two versions of DC’s “Big Three” but then that was grist for the mill for continuity hawks who would then ask things like: “but which stories belong to Earth-One Superman and which to Earth-Two?” I’m on record that I am perfectly fine with deviating from continuity if it results in quality storytelling. Unfortunately, continuity hawks are a vocal minority. However, they really didn’t exist when the stories in this volume came out, so these “Crises” represent the halcyon days of the annual JLA/JSA team up. For fans of Crisis on Infinite Earths, the story “Crisis on Earth-Three,” which introduces the evil analog to the Justice League called the Crime Syndicate of America, provides the background for one of the key figures from Crisis, Alexander Luthor. We don’t meet the “Earth-Three” version of Lex Luthor here, but it’s easy to infer that if Superman’s Earth-Three counterpart is evil, then surely his arch-nemesis would be good. Of course, making a true “crisis” is hard work and while the first two “Crises” in this book make some bit of sense, the others come off as kind of silly, especially the one where Johnny Thunder’s Thunderbolt makes a blond haired thug the last scion of Krypton. But the silliness is part of the fun here to be honest, because of how ridiculous the initial premise of these team ups is to begin with. When it comes to the many Crises on Multiple Earths, I think I enjoy the solo team-ups from The Team Ups more than the annual JLA/JSA crossover. With fewer heroes to manage, the stories in that volume seem tighter and in the case of the Green Lantern story “Secret Origin of the Guardians” provided the spark that would drive Marv Wolfman on Crisis on Infinite Earths. But for all of the flaws, the craziness of these team ups is one of the reasons I fell in love with comics as a kid, and personally I’m at my happiest when engaging my inner ten year old.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Rick

    Well, that was ... yeah, okay, I’m going to be generous and give this volume of superhero team-up shenanigans a 2-star rating because of the era in which it was written and because I clearly have nostalgic sentimentality toward these adventures. But seriously, this stuff is pretty awful. The characterization is inconsistent at best and the stories have no logical flow, as weapons and powers do whatever the writer wants them to do regardless of science, logic or rational thought. Justice League o Well, that was ... yeah, okay, I’m going to be generous and give this volume of superhero team-up shenanigans a 2-star rating because of the era in which it was written and because I clearly have nostalgic sentimentality toward these adventures. But seriously, this stuff is pretty awful. The characterization is inconsistent at best and the stories have no logical flow, as weapons and powers do whatever the writer wants them to do regardless of science, logic or rational thought. Justice League of America #21-22 (1963) start us off with what will become an annual tradition of teaming up heroes from “Earth-One” (Justice League of America) and “Earth-Two” (Justice Society of America). The idea would certainly warm the heart of fans all over I’m sure. Excitement and anticipation like it’s Christmas in July. Unfortunately, the execution leaves a lot to be desired. Justice League of America #29-30 (1964) introduce the reader to the evil versions of the Justice League powerhouses in the Crime Syndicate and “Earth-Three” enters the expanding multiverse. Again, things start off promising, but pointless disregard for characterization and logical extrapolation leaves the entire story nothing more than a string of silly sequences that have no real coherence. I’m sensing a trend here. Justice League of America #37-38 (1965) provide not only another senseless superhero smash-up, but this time the reader gets to witness the creation of an additional reality with “Earth-A” and it’s Earth without a Justice League. Again, there is nothing to propel these stories except irrational fisticuffs and throwing logic and characterization out the window. Justice League of America #46-47 (1966) finishes off this volume and it is filled with even more spectacularly absurdity than anything in the previous stories. There’s nothing like seeing Batman and Wildcat trying to punch a cosmic entity of godlike proportions into submission to add credibility to a narrative. Yep, this makes total sense to me. Sure, there’s a point where the absurd and futile can be fun and entertaining, but his was just tragically awful. To be fair, these stories were written in a different era. The success of Batman’s live-action TV series starring Adam West and Burt Ward was altering how audiences perceived the concept of a costumed crime fighter and absurdist humor was certainly the narrative trend of the day. And I don’t have the same nostalgic attachment to these characters and stories that have with Marvel’s characters. But still, these stories are really nothing more than an annual family reunion of heroes with some contrived villainous plot thrown together. There really isn’t even an attempt made for anything here to make logical sense. There are plot holes to sling planets through, and that literally happens. This is the biggest failing of the stories. So, I’m being generous and giving this collection a second star only for the historical significance to the DC universe and not because there’s really much within worthy of recommending.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Alex Lawless

    I originally started reading this as a way to better understand 52. I figured I would start all the way at the beginning in order to get the full grasp on the story throughout the years. These volumes were first published in the 60's, and I quickly realized this era of comics are just not my thing. Between the art style and the story, it just wasn't something I really enjoyed. It is very much a product of its time.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Duncan

    I really enjoyed Gardner Fox's writing on Hawkman & Batgirl from the 50's/60's it was goofy and corny fun. But the writing on this is just boring and really just awful. I picked this up for $2 on sale at one of my local comic book stores so I thought why not? Other than the recent Heroes in Crisis by Tom King, the "Crisis" theme from DC is one I will carefully avoid at all costs from here on out. I really enjoyed Gardner Fox's writing on Hawkman & Batgirl from the 50's/60's it was goofy and corny fun. But the writing on this is just boring and really just awful. I picked this up for $2 on sale at one of my local comic book stores so I thought why not? Other than the recent Heroes in Crisis by Tom King, the "Crisis" theme from DC is one I will carefully avoid at all costs from here on out.

  10. 4 out of 5

    John

    From 1965 to 1983, DC did an annual crisis/crossover event. Not too unlike the Doctor Who Christmas Special. These comics are hardly essential, but stand as a peak, arch and trope. There's New Gods, 30th Century hijinks and the past. ... From Flash #123, for a quarter-century these tales went on for. Largely comics just being fun before the deconstruction.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Paul Griggs

    An artefact of a different era! Without these early crossovers we’d never have reached the Crisis on Infinite Earths That recently spread to televisions Arrowverse. Bright clean art, cheesy dialogue and a breathless rock em sock em pace. What fun!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Kayla

    Great for a nerdiness-fueled laugh!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jim

    60s comic book writing is pretty cheesy.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Victor Orozco

    Got to say that the think tank over at DC Comics must have been hard pressed for a way to please old fans as well as bringing in some new fans. Basically one of the greatest comic book stories ever written in the Crisis of Infinite Earths started somewhere. What better way to educate fans of this than by introducing a sort of prequel, aka a thorough six-volume collection of the most major Justice League and Justice Society stories from the 1960's through the 1980's? Starting with the 1960's, this Got to say that the think tank over at DC Comics must have been hard pressed for a way to please old fans as well as bringing in some new fans. Basically one of the greatest comic book stories ever written in the Crisis of Infinite Earths started somewhere. What better way to educate fans of this than by introducing a sort of prequel, aka a thorough six-volume collection of the most major Justice League and Justice Society stories from the 1960's through the 1980's? Starting with the 1960's, this collection sets up the remnants of the All-Star Comic book superheroes that started with the Justice Society only to end up being referred to as Earth-2, while later be discovered by Earth-1's Justice League as they team up against a malevolent group of villains known as the Crime Syndicate of America from Earth-3. The Syndicate is a mirror world where the doppelgangers of Earth-1 are the villains. Superman is Ultraman an evil crimelord, Batman is Owlman an evil genius, Wonder Woman is Super Woman a violent sadist, Green Lantern is a Power Ring a cowardly felon, Flash is Johnny Quick an evil speedster, etc. This story is cool for the most part, but the 1960's writing wasn't as dramatic and intense as it is today. New 52 tells Earth-3 better, but its nice to know the concept started here and its okay, but it could have been better. As this story ends another begins with the concept of alternate universes due in part to meddling with the timeline as the world of Earth-A prevents certain heroes from being created. Not as epic as DC's Flashpoint but its interesting in its own right. Not a bad collection, but it feels dated and a bit tacky. D+

  15. 4 out of 5

    The other John

    I didn't really become a big fan of the Justice Society of America until the 80s, but my first encounter with the group was way back in my childhood. For my generation, the JSA were annual guest stars in the old Justice League of America comics. I recall having read a number of stories where my stalwart super-heroes made a visit to Earth-2 to foil some dastardly plot. Unfortunately, I either never owned those particular comics, or my mom made me toss them when they got too ratty. So when I reall I didn't really become a big fan of the Justice Society of America until the 80s, but my first encounter with the group was way back in my childhood. For my generation, the JSA were annual guest stars in the old Justice League of America comics. I recall having read a number of stories where my stalwart super-heroes made a visit to Earth-2 to foil some dastardly plot. Unfortunately, I either never owned those particular comics, or my mom made me toss them when they got too ratty. So when I really got into the JSA, I was forced to prowl the comic shops, looking for those back issues that weren't too expensive. And wouldn't you know it, after I had bought a handful of issues, but before I had purchased them all, DC Comics put out a trade paperback containing all of the JLA/JSA team-ups of yore. I don't know if I saved money or wasted it, but I ended up buying this, the first volume of the reprints. The book reprints the annual team-ups from 1963 through 1966. The 1963 tale features the two teams working together to thwart a gathering of villains from both Earths. In 1964, Mr. Fox introduced Earth-3, the parallel world where all the good guys are bad. 1965's entry revisits the theme on a smaller scale, where only one of the venerable heroes has an evil twin. And then in 1966... well, that one was rather odd. As he proved back in the 40s, not everything Mr. Fox writes is golden. Still, it's a collection worth checking out, even if your not the fan-boy I am.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Peter

    If you've forgotten how incredibly awful comics were in the early-to-mid 1960s, this is the book for you! It's like a steaming turd, carefully gift-wrapped in shiny new paper so you'll open it not realizing just how painfully bad it really is. Stupid minor characters who are so awful that it's actually hard to believe that anyone human actually made them up (like "The Fiddler", for example). No logic at all, no real stories in any sense of the word, just one pointless, stupid event after another. If you've forgotten how incredibly awful comics were in the early-to-mid 1960s, this is the book for you! It's like a steaming turd, carefully gift-wrapped in shiny new paper so you'll open it not realizing just how painfully bad it really is. Stupid minor characters who are so awful that it's actually hard to believe that anyone human actually made them up (like "The Fiddler", for example). No logic at all, no real stories in any sense of the word, just one pointless, stupid event after another. And the dialog...that painful, torturous dialog. Dick Cheney would love this book. One thing that stuck in my mind was Dr. Fate trying magical atomic explosions on a colossal anti-matter creature. They didn't work, so Batman ran around it in a circle, Bat-punching it. Yes, many of the classic DC heroes are here, but they're warped out of all resemblance to the archetypes we know and love. DC thoughtfully put a modern-looking cover on this collection, presumably so that some poor idiots would buy it without realizing that the contents suck in every way imaginable (including, of course, the art). The stories were originally published from 1963-1966. The Code was in full flower. But even under the Code, it wasn't necessary to produce such utter and absolute crap.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Drew Perron

    The stories in this book are insane and ridiculous and incoherent - in the good way. They are bursting at the seams with ideas, and do not stop along the way to make sure those ideas fit together or, necessarily, make sense. (Probably the most nonsensical of these is when one character uses his magical genie to change the past and replace the members of the Justice League with members of his gang. This works with a character like The Flash or Green Lantern, where you can say "Oh, this person got The stories in this book are insane and ridiculous and incoherent - in the good way. They are bursting at the seams with ideas, and do not stop along the way to make sure those ideas fit together or, necessarily, make sense. (Probably the most nonsensical of these is when one character uses his magical genie to change the past and replace the members of the Justice League with members of his gang. This works with a character like The Flash or Green Lantern, where you can say "Oh, this person got hit with lightning and chemicals instead of that person, this person got an alien ring instead of that person". But Superman? Martian Manhunter? BATMAN!? Ah, yes, now my criminal compatriot has had his life changed so that he's tragically dedicated himself to taking down all criminals! Amazing!) It is so much fun, you guys. SO MUCH FUN.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Helmut

    Das Multiversum wächst... In diesem Band wird die Idee des Multiversums, die in "Crisis on Multiple Earths - The Team Ups" begonnen hat, weiter ausgearbeitet. Die JLA von Earth-1 und die JSA von Earth-2 arbeiten mehr und mehr zusammen, und dann kommen plötzlich die Bösewichte von Earth-3 dazu... Stellenweise recht unterhaltsam, meist aber genauso formelhaft und repetitiv wie die anderen JLA-Titel aus dieser Zeit. Als Vorbereitung auf "Crisis on Infinite Earths" aber unerlässlich.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Timothy Boyd

    I was always a big fan of the JLA/JSA crossovers when DC had the multitude of worlds before their revamp in "Crises on Infinite Earths". Great stories and good art and a ton of heroes in each story. Very recommended

  20. 4 out of 5

    Mark

    Justice League of America #21-22, 29-30, 37-38, and 46-47 1963-66 Crisis on Earth-One: JLA meets JSA (Silver Age meets Golden Age) = Justice League #21 Earth-3 introduced = Justice League #29 In color

  21. 5 out of 5

    Sarospice

    Comics are never more fun than when heroes team up with heroes! the JLA and the JSA tradition is one of comic history's best! Amazing art and color pop bop zaps you on every page. They set up ridiculous schemes that can only be defeated by ludicrous plotlines... and you'll love every twist!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Lyric

    Very fun. Good read for anyone who is a fan of the Justice League.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Goose

    These stories are so old they seem almost quaint. Still, nice to read about the past team-ups.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Chris

    So, so; for hardcore fans only.

  25. 5 out of 5

    John Desmarais

    Reprinting the first JLA / JSA team-up. Fun stuff.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Joe

    Ok says it all

  27. 4 out of 5

    James Otis

  28. 4 out of 5

    Alyssa "Aly" Diane

  29. 4 out of 5

    Steve

  30. 4 out of 5

    Julie stafford

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