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Reporting Vietnam: American Journalism 1959-1975

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Now in paperback comes a unique collection that captures a dramatic and controversial war and the brilliant generation of American journalists who reported it. Includes a new Introduction by Ward Just.


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Now in paperback comes a unique collection that captures a dramatic and controversial war and the brilliant generation of American journalists who reported it. Includes a new Introduction by Ward Just.

30 review for Reporting Vietnam: American Journalism 1959-1975

  1. 5 out of 5

    Riley

    Some of these pieces are very powerful. Others show how journalism is often, in the end, an ephemeral art. One passage I highlighted on the horror of the war, from a 1967 New Republic story. "But the newest weapon of them all, and in its own way, the most incredibly impressive for all its civilian normality, was an assemblage of perhaps 80 bulldozers, in many cases airlifted into the midst of the jungle by huge 'Skycrane' helicopters or the somewhat smaller 'Chinooks.' Their job was simple: elimin Some of these pieces are very powerful. Others show how journalism is often, in the end, an ephemeral art. One passage I highlighted on the horror of the war, from a 1967 New Republic story. "But the newest weapon of them all, and in its own way, the most incredibly impressive for all its civilian normality, was an assemblage of perhaps 80 bulldozers, in many cases airlifted into the midst of the jungle by huge 'Skycrane' helicopters or the somewhat smaller 'Chinooks.' Their job was simple: eliminate the jungle once and for all. By the third day of the battle, huge yellow scars had begun to be clearly visible in the deep jungle green as the bulldozers began to plow down the jungle as if some insane developer were suddenly hell-bent on covering Vietnam with Levittowns or parking lots. Such Viet Cong hideouts or tunnels as there were, either were crushed or their exits bulldozed shut, for in many cases the adversary (as well as civilians) hiding in the tunnels disappeared in their deepest recesses rather than surrender. 'Tunnel rats,' American soldiers specially picked for their small size and equipped with gas projectors and what looked like flamethrowers, sometimes penetrated for hundreds of meters into the burrows, looking for what was said to be a veritable 'subway' crossing the whole Triangle. It was never found and perhaps never existed. "Inexorable, the bulldozers bit into the countryside, cutting huge swaths of cleared land right across the Triangle. They were followed by flamethrower tanks and teams on foot, destroying the felled trees with fire. And not only the trees: every human inhabitation within the beaten zone, be it an isolated hut which may have been used by the Viet Cong, or a whole little hamlet inhabited for years by charcoal kilners -- non-white Saigon cooks with charcoal almost exclusively -- went up in flames. There was one day toward the end of the week in which the air was totally still and the sky as transparently fresh and pure as on a spring day in America. Yet as I joined a new unit within the Triangle by helicopter, the whole sky, literally in a 360 degree circle, was framed in by perfectly straight black columns: the earth was being scorched on the whole perimeter of the Iron Triangle. And the town of Ben-Suc was among them."

  2. 4 out of 5

    Paul Jellinek

    This is the condensed paperback version of the two-volume Reporting Vietnam hard-back set produced by Library of America. I read the second volume in hardback several years ago, but couldn't find volume 1, so I read this paperback version instead. Not that it matters. What matters is that this may well be the best single non-fictional account of the American experience in Vietnam that anyone has produced so far. What makes it so powerful is: (a) the broad range of voices and writers; (b) the bre This is the condensed paperback version of the two-volume Reporting Vietnam hard-back set produced by Library of America. I read the second volume in hardback several years ago, but couldn't find volume 1, so I read this paperback version instead. Not that it matters. What matters is that this may well be the best single non-fictional account of the American experience in Vietnam that anyone has produced so far. What makes it so powerful is: (a) the broad range of voices and writers; (b) the breadth of the coverage--from the jungles of South Vietnam to the White House, from the Phu Bai barracks to the streets of Hanoi; and (c) the immediacy of the writing. Remember, most of this is journalism written in the moment and for the moment, so that, in contrast to traditional histories, the writer doesn't know how the story ends (but of course we, the readers, do). Vietnam divided our country in ways that we still haven't overcome and that continue to play out every day in our culture and our politics. This book by itself won't heal those divisions, but it will give us a much better understanding of why the wounds cut so deep, which may be a first step towards healing.

  3. 4 out of 5

    April Helms

    This will fulfill the category of reading a book that takes place more than 5,000 miles from here, for the 2017 Book Riot challenge. Reporting Vietnam is one of the harder books I've read, and not just because it is more than 800 pages. It's a compilation of stories, mostly from war correspondents covering the Vietnam War. This is actually volume 2 of a two-part series, and covers the end of the war and some of the aftermath. Some of the stories deal with the controversies on the homefront (of c This will fulfill the category of reading a book that takes place more than 5,000 miles from here, for the 2017 Book Riot challenge. Reporting Vietnam is one of the harder books I've read, and not just because it is more than 800 pages. It's a compilation of stories, mostly from war correspondents covering the Vietnam War. This is actually volume 2 of a two-part series, and covers the end of the war and some of the aftermath. Some of the stories deal with the controversies on the homefront (of course May 4 at Kent State is covered) but the bulk of it are stories in Vietnam, from the cities to the front lines. Just about every view one can think of -- from President Lyndon B. Johnson to American officers to Vietnamese officers, to those fighting for North Vietnam, to the soldiers on the front line, to Vietnamese civilians, to those supporting the war, to those against the war effort. There's even a column from Sen. John McCain and his experience as a POW. Probably the most moving were the dispatches from Michael Kerr, who was embedded with one unit. The stories pull no punches, and offer a first-hand account of the despair, tragedy and controversy this war produced. For those researching this time period, Reporting Vietnam is an invaluable resource.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Anne Cupero

    Excellent. So many points of view all coming to one conclusion. How hindsight works. How we learn nothing from the past.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Hugh

    Still making my way through this real time collection of the major journalists reporting from Vietnam. It's like a prism with light and insight refracted through so many angles...what a war, so ill-begotten - an orphan even while it was prosecuted...and to "save" the South we bombed the ____ out of it, displacing millions upon millions. Still making my way through this real time collection of the major journalists reporting from Vietnam. It's like a prism with light and insight refracted through so many angles...what a war, so ill-begotten - an orphan even while it was prosecuted...and to "save" the South we bombed the ____ out of it, displacing millions upon millions.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Bruce Amaro

    Excellent selection of works of the period that accurately documents the events of the period. Nothing romantic or emotional, no jingoistic patriotism or cliched remarks about people or events. A good documentation of what happened and the participants. "Fair and balanced" before that cliche became.....cliche. Excellent selection of works of the period that accurately documents the events of the period. Nothing romantic or emotional, no jingoistic patriotism or cliched remarks about people or events. A good documentation of what happened and the participants. "Fair and balanced" before that cliche became.....cliche.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Lizistanton

    Interesting take on the "journalism" that came from that hell hole. I found it too self-serving and inaccurate to be an enjoyable read. My copy is littered with sarcastic remarks and angry denials of the "truth" of the journalism coming from that conflict. Interesting take on the "journalism" that came from that hell hole. I found it too self-serving and inaccurate to be an enjoyable read. My copy is littered with sarcastic remarks and angry denials of the "truth" of the journalism coming from that conflict.

  8. 5 out of 5

    zack

    read mostly for my bachelor's thesis-- absolutely amazing. fantastic first-person accounts. maybe the best work in its specific genre-- check it out. read mostly for my bachelor's thesis-- absolutely amazing. fantastic first-person accounts. maybe the best work in its specific genre-- check it out.

  9. 4 out of 5

    John

    This shows how a war really should be covered but hasn't been since. It includes many stories about the war at home, too, without which there'd be no understanding "Vietnam." This shows how a war really should be covered but hasn't been since. It includes many stories about the war at home, too, without which there'd be no understanding "Vietnam."

  10. 4 out of 5

    Stacy Alesi

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jim M

  12. 4 out of 5

    Stephen

  13. 5 out of 5

    MBP

  14. 5 out of 5

    Nbchristie

  15. 5 out of 5

    Scott

  16. 5 out of 5

    The Futurus Satoshi

  17. 5 out of 5

    Beth

  18. 4 out of 5

    Max Caldwell

  19. 4 out of 5

    Karin

  20. 4 out of 5

    Mariana

  21. 5 out of 5

    Fitriyah Yekti

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jaap Hoogenboezem

  23. 5 out of 5

    Eric

  24. 5 out of 5

    Donald Boen

  25. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

  26. 5 out of 5

    Shawn

  27. 4 out of 5

    Emily Rettner

  28. 4 out of 5

    Emily DelRoss

  29. 5 out of 5

    Paul

  30. 5 out of 5

    Spencer Godfrey

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