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Water Supply Outlook for Western United States: Including Columbia River Drainage in Canada and Federal-State-Private Cooperative Snow Surveys; As of Mar. 1, 1967 (Classic Reprint)

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Excerpt from Water Supply Outlook for Western United States: Including Columbia River Drainage in Canada and Federal-State-Private Cooperative Snow Surveys; As of Mar. 1, 1967 Most of the usable water in western states originates as mountain snowfall. This snowfall accumulates during the winter and spring, several months before the snow melts and appears as streamflow. Sinc Excerpt from Water Supply Outlook for Western United States: Including Columbia River Drainage in Canada and Federal-State-Private Cooperative Snow Surveys; As of Mar. 1, 1967 Most of the usable water in western states originates as mountain snowfall. This snowfall accumulates during the winter and spring, several months before the snow melts and appears as streamflow. Since the runoff from precipitation as snow is delayed estimates of snowmelt runoff can be made well in advance of its occurrence. Streamflow forecasts published in this report are I based principally on measurement of the water equivalent of the mountain snowpack. Forecasts become more accurate as more of the data affecting runoff are measured. Al'l forecasts assume that climatic factors during the remainder of the snow accumulation and melt season as they affect runoff will add to be an effective average. Early season forecasts are therefore subject to a greater change than those made on later dates. The snow course measurement is obtained by sampling snow depth and water equivalent at surveyed and marked locations in mountain areas. A total of about ten samples are taken at each location. The average of these are reported as snow depth and water equivalent. These measurements are repeated in the same location near the same dates each year. Snow surveys are made monthly or semi-monthly from January I through June I in most states. There are about 1400 snow courses in Western United States and in the Columbia Basin in British Columbia. In the near future, it is anticipated that automatic snow water equivalent sensing devices along with radio telemetry will provide a continuous record of snow water equivalent at key locations. Detailed data on snow course and soil moisture measurements are presented in state and local reports. Other data or reservoir storage, summaries of precipitation, current streamflow, and soil moisture conditions at valley elevations are also included. The report for Western United States presents a broad picture of water supply outlook conditions, including selected streamflow forecasts, summary of snow accumulation to date, and storage in larger reservoirs. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.


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Excerpt from Water Supply Outlook for Western United States: Including Columbia River Drainage in Canada and Federal-State-Private Cooperative Snow Surveys; As of Mar. 1, 1967 Most of the usable water in western states originates as mountain snowfall. This snowfall accumulates during the winter and spring, several months before the snow melts and appears as streamflow. Sinc Excerpt from Water Supply Outlook for Western United States: Including Columbia River Drainage in Canada and Federal-State-Private Cooperative Snow Surveys; As of Mar. 1, 1967 Most of the usable water in western states originates as mountain snowfall. This snowfall accumulates during the winter and spring, several months before the snow melts and appears as streamflow. Since the runoff from precipitation as snow is delayed estimates of snowmelt runoff can be made well in advance of its occurrence. Streamflow forecasts published in this report are I based principally on measurement of the water equivalent of the mountain snowpack. Forecasts become more accurate as more of the data affecting runoff are measured. Al'l forecasts assume that climatic factors during the remainder of the snow accumulation and melt season as they affect runoff will add to be an effective average. Early season forecasts are therefore subject to a greater change than those made on later dates. The snow course measurement is obtained by sampling snow depth and water equivalent at surveyed and marked locations in mountain areas. A total of about ten samples are taken at each location. The average of these are reported as snow depth and water equivalent. These measurements are repeated in the same location near the same dates each year. Snow surveys are made monthly or semi-monthly from January I through June I in most states. There are about 1400 snow courses in Western United States and in the Columbia Basin in British Columbia. In the near future, it is anticipated that automatic snow water equivalent sensing devices along with radio telemetry will provide a continuous record of snow water equivalent at key locations. Detailed data on snow course and soil moisture measurements are presented in state and local reports. Other data or reservoir storage, summaries of precipitation, current streamflow, and soil moisture conditions at valley elevations are also included. The report for Western United States presents a broad picture of water supply outlook conditions, including selected streamflow forecasts, summary of snow accumulation to date, and storage in larger reservoirs. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.

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