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How the Culture-Controlled Church Neutered the Gospel If you’re brave enough to take an honest look at the issues facing the culture–controlled church—and the issues in your own life—read on. Do you ever look at how the Christian faith is being lived out in the new millennium and wonder if we’re not doing what we’re supposed to be doing? That we still haven’t quite “gotten How the Culture-Controlled Church Neutered the Gospel If you’re brave enough to take an honest look at the issues facing the culture–controlled church—and the issues in your own life—read on. Do you ever look at how the Christian faith is being lived out in the new millennium and wonder if we’re not doing what we’re supposed to be doing? That we still haven’t quite “gotten it”? That we’ve missed the point regarding many important issues? It’s understandable if we’ve relied on what we’ve been told to believe or what’s widely accepted by the Christian community. But if we truly turned a constructive, critical eye toward our beliefs and vigorously questioned them and their origins, where would we find ourselves? Best-selling authors Brian McLaren and Tony Campolo invite you to do just that. Join them on an adventure—one that’s about uncovering and naming faulty conclusions, suppositions, and assumptions about the Christian faith. In Adventures in Missing the Point, the authors take turns addressing how we’ve missed the point on crucial topics such as: salvation, the Bible, being postmodern, worship, homosexuality, truth, and many more.


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How the Culture-Controlled Church Neutered the Gospel If you’re brave enough to take an honest look at the issues facing the culture–controlled church—and the issues in your own life—read on. Do you ever look at how the Christian faith is being lived out in the new millennium and wonder if we’re not doing what we’re supposed to be doing? That we still haven’t quite “gotten How the Culture-Controlled Church Neutered the Gospel If you’re brave enough to take an honest look at the issues facing the culture–controlled church—and the issues in your own life—read on. Do you ever look at how the Christian faith is being lived out in the new millennium and wonder if we’re not doing what we’re supposed to be doing? That we still haven’t quite “gotten it”? That we’ve missed the point regarding many important issues? It’s understandable if we’ve relied on what we’ve been told to believe or what’s widely accepted by the Christian community. But if we truly turned a constructive, critical eye toward our beliefs and vigorously questioned them and their origins, where would we find ourselves? Best-selling authors Brian McLaren and Tony Campolo invite you to do just that. Join them on an adventure—one that’s about uncovering and naming faulty conclusions, suppositions, and assumptions about the Christian faith. In Adventures in Missing the Point, the authors take turns addressing how we’ve missed the point on crucial topics such as: salvation, the Bible, being postmodern, worship, homosexuality, truth, and many more.

30 review for Adventures in Missing the Point: How the Culture-Controlled Church Neutered the Gospel

  1. 4 out of 5

    Ben Kester

    This was an assigned text in college theology, and I pulled it out again. The authors go through several topics fairly quickly. The conversational style is easy to read. For some of these topics, you might be familiar with the author's viewpoint and the chapter won't add much. Others might be fine conversation starters or more. Some chapters have aged better than others. It's amazing how far we've come on homosexuality since 2006, for instance. This was an assigned text in college theology, and I pulled it out again. The authors go through several topics fairly quickly. The conversational style is easy to read. For some of these topics, you might be familiar with the author's viewpoint and the chapter won't add much. Others might be fine conversation starters or more. Some chapters have aged better than others. It's amazing how far we've come on homosexuality since 2006, for instance.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Joey

    I recommend this book to all of my Christian friends. It helps us reevaluate agendas and beliefs of the church to see if we have "missed the point" and how we can adjust our focus to what really matters in our relationship with God, our neighbors, and our culture. The chapters on doubt, theology, salvation, the end times, and homosexuality were especially eye opening for me. This book gives plenty to think upon and wrestle with if a believer wants to contemplate other angles in which they can vi I recommend this book to all of my Christian friends. It helps us reevaluate agendas and beliefs of the church to see if we have "missed the point" and how we can adjust our focus to what really matters in our relationship with God, our neighbors, and our culture. The chapters on doubt, theology, salvation, the end times, and homosexuality were especially eye opening for me. This book gives plenty to think upon and wrestle with if a believer wants to contemplate other angles in which they can view their faith. I highly recommend it. "Doubt is like pain: it tells us that something nearby or within us is dangerous. It calls for attention and action. Doubt is not always a virtue, however. There is a dark doubt, an exaggerated and self-destructive doubt that leads to despair, depression, and spiritual self-sabotage. Imagination, for example, is good in itself, but out of control it becomes schizophrenia. Fear is healthy, but out of control fear becomes paranoia. Sensitivity is a wonderful gift, and anger is a necessary emotion-but either one out of control can lead to depression. Doubt is the same way. Out of control, it becomes unbelief, a hard heart, an arrogant or defeatist cynicism. But healthy doubt can serve as a Geiger counter that detects error. Without it, we'd be gullible, naive, and just plain stupid. Doubt is similar to guilt, which late Christian philosopher Francis Schaeffer said was like a watchdog: useful to have around to alert you to danger. But if the watchdog turns and attacks the homeowner, it needs to be restrained and retained (220)."

  3. 4 out of 5

    Eric

    Talk about a rush job! I don't think I've ever seen a published book with more typos -- not spellcheck typos, but missing words, incorrect word order and just plain weird stuff. I don't think that the responsive format was as useful as it could be. Either an author agreed with the other and then wrote his own mini-chapter on the topic, or he disagreed and did not give very full support for his disagreement. More back and forth might have been more productive as well: give the original author a ch Talk about a rush job! I don't think I've ever seen a published book with more typos -- not spellcheck typos, but missing words, incorrect word order and just plain weird stuff. I don't think that the responsive format was as useful as it could be. Either an author agreed with the other and then wrote his own mini-chapter on the topic, or he disagreed and did not give very full support for his disagreement. More back and forth might have been more productive as well: give the original author a chance to speak to the rebuttal points if needed. For those on the McLaren trail (e.g. me), this book was a disappointment. McLaren did not come up with any new material for this book that he hasn't been saying all along through the New Kind of Christian series and again more fully in A Generous Orthodoxy. I'm not really sure who the intended audience was, but no matter who the book is meant for, there are better books they could be reading.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Mark

    This book is biblically unsound in many different ways. The authors present a number of different subjects, and "rant" on their idea of how things ought to be. The book at first appears to be a great read as you begin the first few chapters, but it soon digresses into the ultra-liberal biblical doctrine which both authors seem to hold. It screams "Emergent-Church" movement as the authors attempt to persuade you to their point of view which is in most chapters to discard logical and biblical thin This book is biblically unsound in many different ways. The authors present a number of different subjects, and "rant" on their idea of how things ought to be. The book at first appears to be a great read as you begin the first few chapters, but it soon digresses into the ultra-liberal biblical doctrine which both authors seem to hold. It screams "Emergent-Church" movement as the authors attempt to persuade you to their point of view which is in most chapters to discard logical and biblical thinking and embrace post-modernism thought. They use very little scripture to back up their points in some cases. There were a few chapters of the book which were challenging, which I appreciate, but for the most part this book is more of a rant of a couple "culture first, bible second" pastors.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Justin Taylor

    a little outdated for where I am but still a good read. I found Tony Campolo a little too conservative for my liking

  6. 5 out of 5

    Sharon Aubrey

    The authors have some valid points; however, I wouldn't highly recommend it because I found there was a lack of depth in the biblical side of answering questions, which I would have preferred. The authors did have good food for thought on many topics with some biblical guidance, but many of the topics were discussed almost superficially. A person seeking in-depth biblical answers would need to look further in other books. I can see points in the book used as a small group study, and with the rig The authors have some valid points; however, I wouldn't highly recommend it because I found there was a lack of depth in the biblical side of answering questions, which I would have preferred. The authors did have good food for thought on many topics with some biblical guidance, but many of the topics were discussed almost superficially. A person seeking in-depth biblical answers would need to look further in other books. I can see points in the book used as a small group study, and with the right group of people, it could provide a better understanding of the personal relationship the Word of God offers us both individually and in community and points out a lot of religious crap most Christians accept as normal without exploring the heart of God's word.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Paul

    Campolo and McLaren make extremely persuasive arguments why conservative evangelicals should be less conservative evangelicals. For those of us on the mainljne churches - especially Generation X or Millennial folks - this book has several cringeworthy moments, notably the discussions of homosexuality, the value of theological education, and questions of postmodernists and worship styles. I commend both men for their theological growth and development, but they’re asking questions that people lik Campolo and McLaren make extremely persuasive arguments why conservative evangelicals should be less conservative evangelicals. For those of us on the mainljne churches - especially Generation X or Millennial folks - this book has several cringeworthy moments, notably the discussions of homosexuality, the value of theological education, and questions of postmodernists and worship styles. I commend both men for their theological growth and development, but they’re asking questions that people like me just am not asking.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Seán Mchugh

    This was a fabulous book, however I will say the idea was executed more effectively than the content. Iif I had it my way all books that were written about any opinion that could be conceived as divisive should be written in a similar format with opposing perspectives respectfully contrasted with one another throughout the book. I can only hope that more books will be written in this vein, however to date I do not see many.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

    Meh. Two pastors talk about various aspects of culture. Pretty good discussion questions.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Kaitlyn Janzen

    This took me much too long to read. It had some interesting points, and it made me think, so I'd call that a win. This took me much too long to read. It had some interesting points, and it made me think, so I'd call that a win.

  11. 4 out of 5

    J. R.

    This book deals with shortcomings in today's church practice and structure. However, I believe it is less impactful than it could be, since both authors seem to accept much of common church practice as being "just-the-way-it-is", where others (e.g. Viola/Barna _Pagan Christianity_) have a deeper and more insightful critique. There are many useful topics considered in _Adventures . . ._ that are not considered elsewhere in books I have read so far in my study. This book deals with shortcomings in today's church practice and structure. However, I believe it is less impactful than it could be, since both authors seem to accept much of common church practice as being "just-the-way-it-is", where others (e.g. Viola/Barna _Pagan Christianity_) have a deeper and more insightful critique. There are many useful topics considered in _Adventures . . ._ that are not considered elsewhere in books I have read so far in my study.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Chloe

    Really enjoyed this one. Reminded me a bit.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Ashley

    (forgive the stupid review...it's 6am, and I've been up all night) This book didn't really give out any answers. ...and for once, I dont think that was the point of the book! (how refreshing!) Rather, it broached on numerous topics Christians (and society at large) are facing, and offered up some new ways to view them, some questions to ask yourself, and a few tidbits to toss around in your mind. Particularly interesting were the chapters on: Salvation Kingdom of God The Bible Evangelism Homosexuality & D (forgive the stupid review...it's 6am, and I've been up all night) This book didn't really give out any answers. ...and for once, I dont think that was the point of the book! (how refreshing!) Rather, it broached on numerous topics Christians (and society at large) are facing, and offered up some new ways to view them, some questions to ask yourself, and a few tidbits to toss around in your mind. Particularly interesting were the chapters on: Salvation Kingdom of God The Bible Evangelism Homosexuality & Doubt I read a few comments from people saying that they thought the chapters were too short, or that they didn't really go in depth about the topics at hand. Personally, I think that's what made this book for me. They merely brought up a few topics, put out a few ideas on the topic, but then left you with those ideas to mull around and figure out what you believe for yourself. They provided a few different perspectives, but very few (if any) "absolutes", which I really appreciated. As for the format...honestly, I thought it was a little goofy. At times, the other author would respond for, what felt like, merely the sake of responding, even when nothing much was added to the conversation. At other times, they would bring up the most obvious counter-points, to where it felt like they were missing the point of their own book- they weren't going in-depth about these topics, so it kind of amused me when one perspective wasn't really examined, and then during the response the other author would feel the need to come and point that out, and talk about how incredibly different it makes the entire argument. Again- I think everyone reading this book is mostly aware that it seems to be more about starting a conversation with those around you, or even just your own self, rather than TEACHING, so it seemed a little silly to bring that up, imo.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Josh Welker

    This book was not quite as good as A Generous Orthodoxy, but it was a good, short read (I read it over Christmas while traveling). Co-author Tony Campolo is quite a bit more conservative than Brian McLaren and provides some very much-needed balance where McLaren tends to steer off a bit too much to the liberal side. The thesis of the book is that most American Evangelicals are "missing the point" on most hot-button Christian issues by focusing on minor details and neglecting the big picture. The This book was not quite as good as A Generous Orthodoxy, but it was a good, short read (I read it over Christmas while traveling). Co-author Tony Campolo is quite a bit more conservative than Brian McLaren and provides some very much-needed balance where McLaren tends to steer off a bit too much to the liberal side. The thesis of the book is that most American Evangelicals are "missing the point" on most hot-button Christian issues by focusing on minor details and neglecting the big picture. The first section of the book is excellent, providing a strongly Emergent yet still very orthodox critique of the way Evangelicals approach the topics of theology, salvation, the Kingdom, end times, and the Bible. The Bible and salvation chapters are especially good. Unfortunately, the quality declines through the remainder of the book. The "World" section is particularly bad. It is really just the author's opinions on Christian social issues, and many times the authors explicitly disagree with each other. It leaves me to wonder how exactly I am "missing the point" on these issues if the authors can't even agree on what "the point" is. The Sin chapter was also quite bad. The Postmodernism chapter at the end of the book finally got back on track and gave a very positive and non-threatening description of what postmodernism is and how it meshes with Christianity, showing that Christianity flourished in pre-modern times and that we should not be afraid of it dying in postmodern times. Overall, a fairly good read but not the best Emergent book I've come across. I was very thankful for the book format that allowed the co-authors to respond to each other at the end of each chapter because Campolo revealed many instances where McLaren veers much too far to the left that I would have been likely to miss if McLaren was the only author. Read the section on God and the Being Postmodern chapter at the end, and skip the rest if you want.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    This is a hefty book dressed in casual clothes. Within each chapter there is much to be discussed, dissected and discovered. Still, the essence of this book, to me, was the opportunity to look at the practice of my faith with fresh eyes. A simultaneously liberating and terrifying opportunity.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    I read McLaren's "A Generous Orthodoxy" not long ago and was glad I did, even if I found it to be too generous here and there. So when I found this book on a clearance table I thought I'd give it a try. The set-up has a lot of potential, as the authors take turns writing essays on various topics and then responding to and challenging the ideas of the other. Occasionally there are some good insights from both authors, but there's also entirely too much personal opinion put forth as scriptural mand I read McLaren's "A Generous Orthodoxy" not long ago and was glad I did, even if I found it to be too generous here and there. So when I found this book on a clearance table I thought I'd give it a try. The set-up has a lot of potential, as the authors take turns writing essays on various topics and then responding to and challenging the ideas of the other. Occasionally there are some good insights from both authors, but there's also entirely too much personal opinion put forth as scriptural mandate. Even before asking whether or not many of these stances are biblical (little is offered that would persuade that they are), any informed person could pretty easily question the accuracy of the underlying assumptions that led to them. Campolo tosses several whoppers out there over the course of the book. If you're looking to get stretched on these topics it's not likely going to happen here, but you'll learn a little about these authors if you're interested. A couple of the book's strengths are the transparent way in which they share about various personal experiences, and some of the points McLaren makes in his essay on truth. McLaren in particular comes across as affectedly contrary, often for no good reason that I can discern. While I definitely agree with some of his criticisms of church culture, and I share some of his preferences, I wonder if he realizes that there are LOTS of people who simply do not like what he likes. I don't understand why people buy things at truck stop gift stores and then display them in their homes, and I don't understand (to save my life) why people buy Celine Dion albums. I personally can't believe people buy purple cars. But they do, and they want churches and music that speak to their tastes, not mine or Brian McLaren's.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Tom

    This was a book that I wanted to read for quite a while but never went out and purchased for myself. About 1 1/2 weeks ago, I was given this book as a gift and so I dived in and read. It was good, not as good as I had hoped (which made me glad that I wasn’t the one who bought it!). The format was rather simple. Two respected Christian leaders (no matter if you agree with them or not)…each wrote a number of chapters in the book and at the end of each chapter the other one gave a brief response to This was a book that I wanted to read for quite a while but never went out and purchased for myself. About 1 1/2 weeks ago, I was given this book as a gift and so I dived in and read. It was good, not as good as I had hoped (which made me glad that I wasn’t the one who bought it!). The format was rather simple. Two respected Christian leaders (no matter if you agree with them or not)…each wrote a number of chapters in the book and at the end of each chapter the other one gave a brief response to what was written. What was nice was that there wasn’t always agreement between the authors, but never a condemning, ‘you idiot’ attitude either. They talked on such things as the environment, sin, gospel, salvation, social action, postmodernity, homosexuality, women as pastors, doubt, worship and the like. McLaren comes from a postmodern/emerging viewpoint on most issues, while Campolo comes from the ‘left edge’ of Christianity. What was truly a unique experience for me was that, while I have come to appreciate, love the writings of, and agree with a number of things that McLaren (and others) espouse, is that I found myself nodding in agreement at more points with Campolo than McLaren. Even during the times I disagreed with either author I found myself thankful to be understanding where they and others are coming from on these important issues. Good book, not great but worth the read (if you get it as a gift!)

  18. 4 out of 5

    Nate

    Pros: Brian McLaren and Tony Campolo addressing current issues that cripple the church with suggestions for alternative ways of belief and action. Lots of topics. Easy to read, and one doesn't have to read it in a linear fashion because each chapter is basically self-contained. Cons: It seemed like the authors were mostly talking past each other, or they didn't have enough room to adequately address each other's concerns. Point-counterpoint format is good, but I'd like to see it as a point-counter Pros: Brian McLaren and Tony Campolo addressing current issues that cripple the church with suggestions for alternative ways of belief and action. Lots of topics. Easy to read, and one doesn't have to read it in a linear fashion because each chapter is basically self-contained. Cons: It seemed like the authors were mostly talking past each other, or they didn't have enough room to adequately address each other's concerns. Point-counterpoint format is good, but I'd like to see it as a point-counterpoint-countercounterpoint discussion. Lots of topics, but that was part of the problem. Not so much depth. Still, I'd recommend it as a good introduction to the many ways of re-envisioning Protestant Evangelical Christianity.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Molly

    I picked this book up after hearing Tony Campolo speak at a local function. Having read almost everything else he has published in the past 30 years I was thrilled to find something NEW that was not full of the same stories. Campolo is a great story teller-even when recycled they can make you laugh, cry and think. This book was different in that he shares the stage with Brian McLaren. I really enjoyed the differing views offered by each and discovered somethings that I didn't know about Campolo. T I picked this book up after hearing Tony Campolo speak at a local function. Having read almost everything else he has published in the past 30 years I was thrilled to find something NEW that was not full of the same stories. Campolo is a great story teller-even when recycled they can make you laugh, cry and think. This book was different in that he shares the stage with Brian McLaren. I really enjoyed the differing views offered by each and discovered somethings that I didn't know about Campolo. This is the first book I read with Brian McLaren, but everytime I pass a book of his in the bookstore now, I pick it up...his space on my shelf is growing.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Daniel

    The chapter on sin, or more accurately how we should deal graciously toward others who are struggling with sin, was the best chapter of this book. The rest of the book had some very good points, but the chapters were filled with over-reactions, straw-men arguments and very biblically weak theology. I found this book to be dangerous, not for the points the authors try to make (many of them very good points), but for the way they try to make them. The foundation of their arguments was more philoso The chapter on sin, or more accurately how we should deal graciously toward others who are struggling with sin, was the best chapter of this book. The rest of the book had some very good points, but the chapters were filled with over-reactions, straw-men arguments and very biblically weak theology. I found this book to be dangerous, not for the points the authors try to make (many of them very good points), but for the way they try to make them. The foundation of their arguments was more philosophical than biblical and therefore dangerous to those who would tread it and assume that these are mostly Biblical arguments that are put forth.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Karen

    It was an interesting take on many "important issues" that the church faces today. Quite frankly, I think many of these so-called issues are over-blown and fed as a means of encouraging conflict within memberships rather than a means of speaking truth and gospel. That said, there were some points where I agreed wholeheartedly, and others where I wondered if the AUTHORS had missed the point. All told, however, it was good to read about subjects that often make me angry, uncomfortable or even comp It was an interesting take on many "important issues" that the church faces today. Quite frankly, I think many of these so-called issues are over-blown and fed as a means of encouraging conflict within memberships rather than a means of speaking truth and gospel. That said, there were some points where I agreed wholeheartedly, and others where I wondered if the AUTHORS had missed the point. All told, however, it was good to read about subjects that often make me angry, uncomfortable or even completely disgusted. Anyone raised in a strict "fundamentalist" edged church should read this, just for a different view on what they have heard their entire lives.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Simon

    a worthwhile read . interesting in that one author essays a topic relevant to Christians and the other author gives a critique. sort of point-counterpoint. both authors I have respect for and both come from what I would assume to be somewhat different perspectives. interesting in that I found myself endorsing the point of view of one author and then agreeing with the counterpoint of the other. it left me feeling that so often I can entrench myself in one viewpoint without giving creedence to ano a worthwhile read . interesting in that one author essays a topic relevant to Christians and the other author gives a critique. sort of point-counterpoint. both authors I have respect for and both come from what I would assume to be somewhat different perspectives. interesting in that I found myself endorsing the point of view of one author and then agreeing with the counterpoint of the other. it left me feeling that so often I can entrench myself in one viewpoint without giving creedence to another. it brings balance I think to the tension that may exist between a modernist and post-modernist faith outlook.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Randy

    I liked this book well enough, I suppose. Though they're both something of mavericks in modern evangelical Christianity, Brian McLaren and Tony Campolo do a relatively good job of balancing each other in this book. When McLaren abandons orthodoxy, Campolo pulls him back in. When Campolo gets lost in mysticism, McLaren calls him to a more practical faith. Both authors know something is missing from the modern Church and do their best to help restore it. A bit too often they miss the point as well. I liked this book well enough, I suppose. Though they're both something of mavericks in modern evangelical Christianity, Brian McLaren and Tony Campolo do a relatively good job of balancing each other in this book. When McLaren abandons orthodoxy, Campolo pulls him back in. When Campolo gets lost in mysticism, McLaren calls him to a more practical faith. Both authors know something is missing from the modern Church and do their best to help restore it. A bit too often they miss the point as well. I guess that's part of the point.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Brandon

    The authors take turns in this book writing a chapter on specific theological topics, then the other author writes a short reply to the chapter. I found the book to provide a nice historical and balancing view to a laundry list of theological issues. Campolo often comes at topics from more of an evangelical, conservative stance, while McLaren is more liberal and open in his views. The nice thing about this book is that if you are not interested in certain topics you can skip chapters without mis The authors take turns in this book writing a chapter on specific theological topics, then the other author writes a short reply to the chapter. I found the book to provide a nice historical and balancing view to a laundry list of theological issues. Campolo often comes at topics from more of an evangelical, conservative stance, while McLaren is more liberal and open in his views. The nice thing about this book is that if you are not interested in certain topics you can skip chapters without missing an important portion of the text.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Melissa

    This book includes some of the most controversial and personally challenging topics on Christianity and The Church that are out there. Homosexuality, Doubt, Social Action... It's great to think about and discuss with other believers, strengthening your own beliefs throughout the process. I really like how Brian McLaren and Tony Campolo switch off writing the chapters and then provide opposing commentary from another view. I highly recommend this book for group talks as well as personal reading. This book includes some of the most controversial and personally challenging topics on Christianity and The Church that are out there. Homosexuality, Doubt, Social Action... It's great to think about and discuss with other believers, strengthening your own beliefs throughout the process. I really like how Brian McLaren and Tony Campolo switch off writing the chapters and then provide opposing commentary from another view. I highly recommend this book for group talks as well as personal reading.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Danny Bennett

    The reality is that there are much better books written on each of the topics in this book. I first read this book in college with a conservative and a liberal. I liked to think I was the moderate view but I am probably more conservative today after reading and interacting with people who know what they are talking about. There are many times I feel like McLaren and Campolo miss the point. The views the two hold are pretty much what you would expect from their emerging church movement, a movemen The reality is that there are much better books written on each of the topics in this book. I first read this book in college with a conservative and a liberal. I liked to think I was the moderate view but I am probably more conservative today after reading and interacting with people who know what they are talking about. There are many times I feel like McLaren and Campolo miss the point. The views the two hold are pretty much what you would expect from their emerging church movement, a movement which seems to have lost the popularity they once had.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Robert Frank

    This book is a rare treat. Two creative Christian writers, well known for their mature thinking, share their views about how culture has sometimes caused Christian views to drift away from what they were intended to be. The authors took turns writing the chapters, but at the end of each chapter the other writer added his views. They didn’t always agree with each other, but they courageously raised issues that need to be discussed by mature Christians. We live in a rapidly changing civilization a This book is a rare treat. Two creative Christian writers, well known for their mature thinking, share their views about how culture has sometimes caused Christian views to drift away from what they were intended to be. The authors took turns writing the chapters, but at the end of each chapter the other writer added his views. They didn’t always agree with each other, but they courageously raised issues that need to be discussed by mature Christians. We live in a rapidly changing civilization and it is important for active Christians to try to keep up. This book will help.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Bo Liles

    I'm moving this book to the read shelf, even though I will openly admit I have not read the entire thing word for word. it is quickly becoming a reference book, which for me means i will pull it off the shelf often and see if the subject matter informs my particular study at the time. A good book, but I sense a lack of passion. Not that it is not there, but the energy of the authors solo works does not translate here. A good book, but nothing I haven't heard each man say elsewhere. I'm moving this book to the read shelf, even though I will openly admit I have not read the entire thing word for word. it is quickly becoming a reference book, which for me means i will pull it off the shelf often and see if the subject matter informs my particular study at the time. A good book, but I sense a lack of passion. Not that it is not there, but the energy of the authors solo works does not translate here. A good book, but nothing I haven't heard each man say elsewhere.

  29. 5 out of 5

    J.D.

    A really good book that covers many different topics concerning people and Christians today. Because there are many different issues that they talk about, however, they are not really able to expound on them too much. This does a great job in starting to create a dialogue on these issues rather than simply making them black and white. We would do well to take this approach and open our eyes a little more to understand others.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jack

    I hav to start off by saying I am NOT a big fan of Brian McClaren, but I enjoy what he writes sometimes, This is worth the read. Brian and Tony (Campolo) hit the major topics and how we miss the point. They tackle evangelism, theology, the Bible, salvation, culture and a myriad of other topics. It is like a point-counterpoint, although sometimes they both agree. Short chapters (topics) that can be picked up anywhere in the book, for all of you non-linear types like me.

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