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A beautiful memoir from an exciting young writer, Meg Fee, on finding her way in New York City. Full of the dramas and quiet moments that make up a life, told with humor, heart, and hope.  In Places I Stopped on the Way Home, Meg Fee plots a decade of her life in New York City – from falling in love at the Lincoln Center to escaping the roommate (and bedbugs) from hell on T A beautiful memoir from an exciting young writer, Meg Fee, on finding her way in New York City. Full of the dramas and quiet moments that make up a life, told with humor, heart, and hope.  In Places I Stopped on the Way Home, Meg Fee plots a decade of her life in New York City – from falling in love at the Lincoln Center to escaping the roommate (and bedbugs) from hell on Thompson Street, chasing false promises on 66th Street and the wrong men everywhere, and finding true friendships over glasses of wine in Harlem and Greenwich Village. Weaving together her joys and sorrows, expectations and uncertainties, aspirations and realities, the result is an exhilarating collection of essays about love and friendship, failure and suffering, and above all hope. Join Meg on her heart-wrenching journey, as she cuts the difficult path to finding herself and finding home.


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A beautiful memoir from an exciting young writer, Meg Fee, on finding her way in New York City. Full of the dramas and quiet moments that make up a life, told with humor, heart, and hope.  In Places I Stopped on the Way Home, Meg Fee plots a decade of her life in New York City – from falling in love at the Lincoln Center to escaping the roommate (and bedbugs) from hell on T A beautiful memoir from an exciting young writer, Meg Fee, on finding her way in New York City. Full of the dramas and quiet moments that make up a life, told with humor, heart, and hope.  In Places I Stopped on the Way Home, Meg Fee plots a decade of her life in New York City – from falling in love at the Lincoln Center to escaping the roommate (and bedbugs) from hell on Thompson Street, chasing false promises on 66th Street and the wrong men everywhere, and finding true friendships over glasses of wine in Harlem and Greenwich Village. Weaving together her joys and sorrows, expectations and uncertainties, aspirations and realities, the result is an exhilarating collection of essays about love and friendship, failure and suffering, and above all hope. Join Meg on her heart-wrenching journey, as she cuts the difficult path to finding herself and finding home.

30 review for Places I Stopped on the Way Home: A Memoir of Chaos and Grace

  1. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

    Meg Fee came to New York City to study drama at Julliard. Her short essays, most of them titled after NYC locations (plus a few set further afield), are about the uncertainty of her twenties: falling in and out of love, having an eating disorder, and searching for her purpose. She calls herself “a mess of disparate wants, a small universe in bloom.” New York is where she has an awful job she hates, can’t get the man she’s in love with to really notice her, and hops between terrible apartments – Meg Fee came to New York City to study drama at Julliard. Her short essays, most of them titled after NYC locations (plus a few set further afield), are about the uncertainty of her twenties: falling in and out of love, having an eating disorder, and searching for her purpose. She calls herself “a mess of disparate wants, a small universe in bloom.” New York is where she has an awful job she hates, can’t get the man she’s in love with to really notice her, and hops between terrible apartments – including one with bedbugs, the subject of my favorite essay – and yet the City continues to lure her with its endless opportunities. I think this book could mean a lot to women who are younger than me or have had experiences similar to the author’s. I found the essays slightly repetitive, and rather unkindly wondered what this privileged young woman really had to whine about sometimes. It’s got that American, generically spiritual self-help vibe you get from authors like Brené Brown and Elizabeth Gilbert; I’m actually surprised it was published in the UK. Despite her loneliness, Fee retains a romantic view of things, and the way she writes about her crushes and boyfriends didn’t connect with me at all (e.g. “I am 27 the first time I see Eric am immediately struck by the clarity of his image” plus – awkward transition alert – “Sitting at the bar, my mind wanders to the man I began dating just after George.”). I read the first 48 pages of a library copy and was going to give up on the book when – surprise! Over 6.5 months after I first asked for a copy, Icon Books sent me copies of this and Nancy Tucker’s That Was When People Started to Worry. So I picked up where I left off, keeping it as a bedside book and generally reading an essay a night. My initial impressions remained unaltered. Some favorite lines: “Writing felt like wrangling storm clouds, which is to say, impossible. But so did life. Writing became a way to make peace with that which was flawed.” “I have let go of the idea of permanency and roots and What Comes Next.” “I want a life that cannot be plotted on spreadsheets or graphs.” “there is so much beauty in the world and I am wasting my time just making it through the day.” “the city was, in so many ways, and for such a long time, the best and worst thing about my life.” & one I didn’t like (her self-definition): “I am quiet mornings and endless lattes and long road trips.” – Ick!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Elaine

    Closer to 2.5 if I am honest. I feel impossibly sad that Fee seems to have spent almost all of her formative years focused solely on self fulfilment, worth and value at the hands of the men she let’s into her life. This seems entirely focused on her looks. I didn’t enjoy her lack of self awareness in her own behaviour but her contented-ness to pyseudo analyse the men in her life who didn’t give her what she wanted (Eric’s mother died when he was young - was that really your story to tell and use a Closer to 2.5 if I am honest. I feel impossibly sad that Fee seems to have spent almost all of her formative years focused solely on self fulfilment, worth and value at the hands of the men she let’s into her life. This seems entirely focused on her looks. I didn’t enjoy her lack of self awareness in her own behaviour but her contented-ness to pyseudo analyse the men in her life who didn’t give her what she wanted (Eric’s mother died when he was young - was that really your story to tell and use as a reason for why he didn’t want you? Maybe he just ... didn’t want you.) There are a lot of adhoc details in here that are straight out of the movies (drinking whisky neat and the bartender appraising her for it? Her assertion that it is ‘the best party trick I know for flirting’ - Just more evidence of her inability to feel whole without male attentions). No matter how much she insisted that she was ‘broken’ - her lack of self awareness meant I struggled to feel much empathy. Lines such as ‘she was pretty but not exceptionally so’ made me tired to my bones that this is how an author would talk about other women, and that Fee might actually only be a vacuous product of her cultural environment. I am sad that I see so many young women feeling aligned with this book. There was nothing in here that elevated any line of thinking for me. Just more archaic narratives around young women and the narcissism of dating.

  3. 4 out of 5

    LoneStarWords Deb Coco

    Our job is not to create a masterpiece, but to give voice to that which only we can give voice to. Our job is to go to work doing that which we feel called to do. Despite our fears - despite the nagging notion that we are not enough, or too much, or fraudulent, we show up. We take risks. We wrestle with our wants and our needs and the blank canvas. And we let the wrestling change us. Because in the space of that change - in the space of who we once were and who we become - is the divine. Meg Fee Our job is not to create a masterpiece, but to give voice to that which only we can give voice to. Our job is to go to work doing that which we feel called to do. Despite our fears - despite the nagging notion that we are not enough, or too much, or fraudulent, we show up. We take risks. We wrestle with our wants and our needs and the blank canvas. And we let the wrestling change us. Because in the space of that change - in the space of who we once were and who we become - is the divine. Meg Fee Places I Stopped on the Way Home After stumbling upon this treasure of essays by change last week, I savored/devoured it over the weekend, reading until past my bedtime last night. This book checked off just about all my boxes: memoir, NYC setting, and gorgeous writing packed with personal wisdom. As you can see from this photo, I’ve marked multiple passages and the pages are full of pencil underlines. I soaked this book up. Meg Fee is able to articulate the angst that is our 20s and allows us inside her mind as she navigates “the” city amidst her personal coming of age. I loved everything about this memoir. Fee does not glamorize NYC, which is so often the case. She gives you the good with the bad - right down to the bedbugs. She admits NYC is often to be endured, that despite a city with millions, it can be impossible to find your person and your home. But her prose, as she grapples with life, is what makes this book so powerful. A little book with a big punch.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Caiti S

    Having read a lot of blogs-turned-books, I'm happy to say that this stands out in the genre. I've read Meg's blog off and on for years, so I was familiar with many of her relationship stories and her general writing style, but this book was beautifully cohesive and more polished than her blog, while still being raw and messy and honest. She managed to capture the confusion that is your 20's in a way that didn't feel cliche or overwrought. I really liked how the book was structured, with each ess Having read a lot of blogs-turned-books, I'm happy to say that this stands out in the genre. I've read Meg's blog off and on for years, so I was familiar with many of her relationship stories and her general writing style, but this book was beautifully cohesive and more polished than her blog, while still being raw and messy and honest. She managed to capture the confusion that is your 20's in a way that didn't feel cliche or overwrought. I really liked how the book was structured, with each essay being connected to a location in New York; it perfectly encapsulated how memories can be triggered by specific places. I did have a few quabbles about how judgemental she often seemed toward other women, in a way that was even harsher than the men who treated her poorly, and I wish she would have examined this attitude within herself. She also writes often of her deep sadness during this time, but I wish she would have articulated this more, rather than leaving it to vagaries. It led me to assume that the sadness was a result of her failed relationships, but I don't think that's the whole story. ... You could also make a drinking game out of each time Meg mentions a man putting his hand on her thigh/knee/neck, lol.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Robby

    I loved this collection of essays! The writing is absolutely beautiful, like poetry on every page. Sometimes I just had to pause, sigh, and take in what I had read, because it was so poignant and personal. I feel like I discovered things about myself, things that always resided deep down inside, but that were brought to light through Meg's unique vision of life, love, and happiness. I was literally stunned by several of the individual essays. I was deeply moved, and found myself hanging on every wor I loved this collection of essays! The writing is absolutely beautiful, like poetry on every page. Sometimes I just had to pause, sigh, and take in what I had read, because it was so poignant and personal. I feel like I discovered things about myself, things that always resided deep down inside, but that were brought to light through Meg's unique vision of life, love, and happiness. I was literally stunned by several of the individual essays. I was deeply moved, and found myself hanging on every word. I will definitely be reading these essays over and over again. I've been reading Meg's blog for years, and everyone always tells her that she needs to write a book. I am so glad that she finally did, because the result was totally satisfying. I am extremely impressed. Thanks, Meg, for sharing with us such an incredible work of art!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Maura

    Don't believe the hype I dunno. Maybe I am too jaded -as a native New Yorker - to get this book. The reviews were some of the most beautiful praise i have read for a book so I went for it. It annoyed me as much as sex and the city should annoy real new yorkers . She is indulgent,self absorbed and entitled. Whaaa a boy doesn't like me. Whaa I have an eating disorder - but not really..I vacation for a month here,a month there, go to Paris with my mother. I smell a spoiled rich girl who wouldn't kno Don't believe the hype I dunno. Maybe I am too jaded -as a native New Yorker - to get this book. The reviews were some of the most beautiful praise i have read for a book so I went for it. It annoyed me as much as sex and the city should annoy real new yorkers . She is indulgent,self absorbed and entitled. Whaaa a boy doesn't like me. Whaa I have an eating disorder - but not really..I vacation for a month here,a month there, go to Paris with my mother. I smell a spoiled rich girl who wouldn't know real struggle of it bit her in the ass. That's why she couldn't relate to NY. IT'S RA

  7. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    ugh, couldn't finish. I heard the author on a podcast and thought the book sounded interesting. If you're interested in reading about how a twenty something's sexual exploits and eating disorder helped her find herself, than this is the book for you. But halfway through, I found nothing at all relevant to my life or worth reading. ugh, couldn't finish. I heard the author on a podcast and thought the book sounded interesting. If you're interested in reading about how a twenty something's sexual exploits and eating disorder helped her find herself, than this is the book for you. But halfway through, I found nothing at all relevant to my life or worth reading.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Emily Blasik

    I've been an avid reader of Meg Fee's blog since I was in high school, so I was expecting nothing less than greatness from Places I Stopped. It's even better than I had hoped. I didn't want to put it down, but I dreaded landing on the last page. For women everywhere, her stories are unbelievably relatable, her words life-giving. I never read a book twice, but I have a feeling I'll keep coming back to this one. I've been an avid reader of Meg Fee's blog since I was in high school, so I was expecting nothing less than greatness from Places I Stopped. It's even better than I had hoped. I didn't want to put it down, but I dreaded landing on the last page. For women everywhere, her stories are unbelievably relatable, her words life-giving. I never read a book twice, but I have a feeling I'll keep coming back to this one.

  9. 4 out of 5

    lisa

    I finished this book thinking about other girls my age, somewhere out there, living their lives and experiencing different things and different feelings, and it made me wish that my life wasn't so dull, LOL. I've been a fan of Meg's words for a while, and I'm grateful that she decided to share this little snippet of her life so that I could vicariously live through her experiences. I finished this book thinking about other girls my age, somewhere out there, living their lives and experiencing different things and different feelings, and it made me wish that my life wasn't so dull, LOL. I've been a fan of Meg's words for a while, and I'm grateful that she decided to share this little snippet of her life so that I could vicariously live through her experiences.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jill

    I like her blog, but this less than 60 page 'book' is pretty ridiculous. Think she should have waited for more material and more cohesion for an actual book. Just read the blog, it's much better. I like her blog, but this less than 60 page 'book' is pretty ridiculous. Think she should have waited for more material and more cohesion for an actual book. Just read the blog, it's much better.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Anna B

    THIS is the book to read when turning thirty. It's about forgiving yourself for your 20s, taking the time to reflect, and moving forward with the whole of yourself. THIS is the book to read when turning thirty. It's about forgiving yourself for your 20s, taking the time to reflect, and moving forward with the whole of yourself.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Emily Kate

    A courageous and beautiful assertion of vulnerability The girl-dating-and-sorting-out-her-place-in-the-big-city memoir genre has its fair share of sardonic, sarcastic, young authors. They are snappy, amusingly world-weary and precociously ‘wise’ as they navigate caddish man-boys, the dashing of rose-colored hopes, drunkenness, and failed birth control. They’re a hoot, and the arch wit that frames their receipt of spectacularly callous male behaviours as awkward, wacky-awful adventures serves to A courageous and beautiful assertion of vulnerability The girl-dating-and-sorting-out-her-place-in-the-big-city memoir genre has its fair share of sardonic, sarcastic, young authors. They are snappy, amusingly world-weary and precociously ‘wise’ as they navigate caddish man-boys, the dashing of rose-colored hopes, drunkenness, and failed birth control. They’re a hoot, and the arch wit that frames their receipt of spectacularly callous male behaviours as awkward, wacky-awful adventures serves to reassure readers who might struggle to maintain hope, if not self-respect in the wake of their own experiences. This is all part of being a sassy young thing!!!! They’ve certainly reassured and entertained THIS reader, anyway. Meg Fee’s memoir covers the dating territory, through the lens of a different temperament. Pretty, intelligent and with a degree from a prestigious conservatory, Meg moves in the sort of social milieu where bumping into the ‘pre-eminent American playwright’ and discussing writing and music with him over a glass of red wine is a thing that happens. There’s no braggadocio regarding this fact, nor in the revelation that the fellow acting classmate with whom she has an on-off, never-quite-right-connection over nearly a decade is now a marquee player. For all that the men she dates may boast bylines in the Wall St Journal, sweep her off her feet at weddings, have the wherewithal to try to whip her away to Paris for a weekend, and sound scrumptious with their winter coats and mussed hair, they are essentially the type to whom the more frankly-speaking sector of the millennial/Gen Y cohort despatch with a term starting in f and ending in boi. Her attempts to forge relationships of meaning with these men who seem to tick a lot of desirable boxes are not envy-making. That these relationships don’t ever solidify makes their beautiful evocation all the more poignant. It’s all happening in an iconic, storied city, but the difficult reality of the slog it takes to make a life there is honestly detailed even as its charms are acknowledged and enjoyed. Highly sensitive and heartbreakingly earnest, Meg looks back and unabashedly reveals her willingness to take these young men at their own estimation, and that she faults herself when they are unable to form connections that satisfy either of them. Her determination to give men the benefit of the doubt for longer than may be prudent seems evergreen, but toward the end of the book she is beginning to tire of pretenders, to see underneath their self-branding and to realise that they have benefited from her tendency to project and to hope. She begins to own her values, define for herself what she wants, what she deserves. At dinner a man she calls a friend asks what she will ‘bring to the table’ in a relationship and he meets her answer with condescension; this shifts her into a re-evaluation of the presentations of love among those around her, recognition that there is a degree of display that is intolerable to her. When her kind, happily-married, unaffected older friend takes her by the arm, looks her in the eye and firmly instructs her ‘don’t you dare settle’, she takes it in. Her critical faculties begin to be utilised not for self-castigation but for self-protection and affirmation of her selfhood— she develops a radar for those who will denigrate her seriousness, gravity, capacity for hope, and who will be intimidated by the emergence of a perspicacity she has kept thus far concealed, not least from herself. She's a far better judge of character than she once imagined. This willingness to be so revealing about the time when one is searching for love with a hungry heart is incredibly brave. These are cynical times and derision for finer feelings hovers; men and women alike are ready to disparage rather than sympathise with the defenceless naiveté of yearning. Kudos to the publisher who saw the value in a memoir of lost loves that doesn’t conclude with its author swanning away with the dreamy mate who makes all that came before worthwhile. The publisher’s faith that a young woman’s journey to herself is more fascinating and nourishing than a redemptive meet-cute and happily-ever after has paid off. That the author will pair up suitably is an inevitabilty that belongs off the page. What we have here is an elegant, poignant account of that liminal stage when a young, talented woman awakes to her own unique gifts and potential, discovers excitement in her separateness, and takes the steps in a life path that are guided by her soul. She makes a home in her own heart.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Isobel Porteous

    An absolute gift of a book brought to me by @nycbookgirl via Julia Kingston. Recommend it so highly for New York girls.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Meg Mulder

    I picked up this book because I love New York - a ‘long-ago obsession with the TV show Felicity and a brief visit in a chapter of a very bizarre, very unhealthy relationship with a crack addict’ kind of love. I’ve been through the car crash that is your twenties and I was taken by how Meg Fee controls and sorts words on a page, her observations of minutiae, the beauty to be found in the banal, the overwhelming sadness of ordinary life. But. Look, not every book by a white writer needs to centre I picked up this book because I love New York - a ‘long-ago obsession with the TV show Felicity and a brief visit in a chapter of a very bizarre, very unhealthy relationship with a crack addict’ kind of love. I’ve been through the car crash that is your twenties and I was taken by how Meg Fee controls and sorts words on a page, her observations of minutiae, the beauty to be found in the banal, the overwhelming sadness of ordinary life. But. Look, not every book by a white writer needs to centre an examination of privilege, but the fact that it doesn’t even garner a passing nod is very telling. As is the embarrassingly unironic declaration that she burnt sage in her apartment to offset the bad energy of a former housemate. Could she really be that clueless? I may still have been inclined to round up my stars to 3 rather than down to 2, but despite the good writing (very good at times), there were several cringey moments of pseudo-wisdom, and at its most basic Fee has mistaken the quest to fall in love for actual love. These are two VERY different things.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    The part of me that picked up this title was hungry for nostalgic mercury retrograde time warp back to my 20’s in NYC. But this book is so very repetitive, narcissistic, and entitled. Corny prose about becoming a woman and finding one’s way in the city (apparently this is done exclusively through a series of dudes with tousled hair whose charm lies in their ability to tilt their head at just the right angle) would have delighted my high school self; hungry for life in the big city but now, it ma The part of me that picked up this title was hungry for nostalgic mercury retrograde time warp back to my 20’s in NYC. But this book is so very repetitive, narcissistic, and entitled. Corny prose about becoming a woman and finding one’s way in the city (apparently this is done exclusively through a series of dudes with tousled hair whose charm lies in their ability to tilt their head at just the right angle) would have delighted my high school self; hungry for life in the big city but now, it makes for repetitive eye rolls and me shouting at the audiobook while cleaning my apartment “then f’ing leave New York already!” I gotta stop reading bloggers turned book authors.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Carmen Liffengren

    3.5 Stars Intimate portraits revealing the depth of human complexity really speak to me and I was hoping to discover how New York City shaped Fee's life as she chronicles her life there from age 18-30. When I first started reading Places I Stopped on the Way Home, I found some of the somewhat repetitive essays more a compendium of endless heartbreak. I wanted more about life in the city, but I found myself struggling to keep the men in her life clear while struggling with her fluid timeline as we 3.5 Stars Intimate portraits revealing the depth of human complexity really speak to me and I was hoping to discover how New York City shaped Fee's life as she chronicles her life there from age 18-30. When I first started reading Places I Stopped on the Way Home, I found some of the somewhat repetitive essays more a compendium of endless heartbreak. I wanted more about life in the city, but I found myself struggling to keep the men in her life clear while struggling with her fluid timeline as well. Fee has a lyrical style to her writing that sometimes tips into style over substance, but then I had to step back a bit to immerse myself in Fee's uncertain and messy twenties just following college. Her memoir is a collection of loosely connected essays and some are stronger than others. Her essay about the fallout of a friendship over an apartment with bedbugs stands out in sharp relief from many of the others because her prose seems more solid and less impressionistic than the others. Fee struggles with an eating disorder while consistently falling for men that will only break her heart. In many ways, her NYC was cruel and relentless when she expected magic and whimsy and love. I often found Fee emotional and raw, but her memoir lacked some cohesive quality that failed for me to completely understand her experience. NYC becomes this blurred, somewhat rainy and grey backdrop to her life and I found myself wondering if she would have had a similar twelve years living in another city. Did it even matter that it was NYC? The city was, in so many ways, and for such a long time, the best and worst thing about my life. Overall, I did like her musings about a young adult life lived in one of the most vibrant cities in the world, but I wanted to come out knowing Meg Fee better. I did not read her blog before reading her memoir. I wanted so much more personal growth for her. I glimpsed it in some of her essays: It turns out that so much of growing up is about walking away from That Which is Not Right in pursuit of something better. Her memoir ends on a hopeful note and I look forward to reading about where her life takes her and if that life is better not in NYC.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Joanne

    Places I Stopped on the Way Home by Meg Fee is a collection of essays covering her ten years in New York from when arriving as a fresh faced student at Julliard age 18. It is a deeply personal and honest account of the highs and lows of her time living in the city. The author describes first loves, first heartbreak, her first taste of independence beautifully, almost lyrically. She recounts memories associated with buildings or places or times in her life and includes her thoughts about just what Places I Stopped on the Way Home by Meg Fee is a collection of essays covering her ten years in New York from when arriving as a fresh faced student at Julliard age 18. It is a deeply personal and honest account of the highs and lows of her time living in the city. The author describes first loves, first heartbreak, her first taste of independence beautifully, almost lyrically. She recounts memories associated with buildings or places or times in her life and includes her thoughts about just what is home. She is very honest about her struggles with body image, food related disorders and mental health. Her self image and lack of confidence affected her decision making. She wanted to be loved, but often knew she was not with the right person.  As she comes to terms with her feelings, she includes the wise words - "The body changes, it adjusts. But added or lost weight does not change a person." One essay in particular - On Home II -  was a short but very beautiful piece on what matters in a relationship and really spoke to me. She talks of wanting a partner to "sit next to me on the doorstep on the front stoop and with your hand cupping my neck promise me quiet Sunday mornings with coffee and the paper and unfinished crossword puzzles. Promise me that arm that reaches out when I step off the curb a minute too soon. An extra set of hands to pull my zipper or put the groceries away. Flowers for no reason at all. The coffee brewed before I wake. Passed art sections and shared looks and your hand on my knee for as long as we both shall live. Dancing in the kitchen, bare feet and no music except for that song wetting your lips." New York is brought vividly to life in the book along with the author's mixed feelings for this great city.  As she lived and wrote her way through all the places, she was finding herself, her place in the world, her way home.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Anna

    "The twenties are hard. Everyone who is not in their twenties says this. And everyone who is in their twenties knows this. But when you are in the middle of it, hearing people who are not, say, Yeah, it's rough, isn't terribly helpful. But then you start to crest upon a new decade and you think, Holy shit! The twenties are so, so hard, but the view from up here is incredible!" I rarely read memoirs or autobiographies because they make me sad. And sadness is the only emotion I cannot deal with "The twenties are hard. Everyone who is not in their twenties says this. And everyone who is in their twenties knows this. But when you are in the middle of it, hearing people who are not, say, Yeah, it's rough, isn't terribly helpful. But then you start to crest upon a new decade and you think, Holy shit! The twenties are so, so hard, but the view from up here is incredible!" I rarely read memoirs or autobiographies because they make me sad. And sadness is the only emotion I cannot deal with. Meg Fee's memoir tells you how it is being twentysomething, there is no sugar-coating and I must admit - it did make me sad. But this book was true and I identified with Meg and shared all of her worries and fears. Fear of being lonely, fear of not living the life we wish to live while everyone around us seems to be doing this thing called life so much better that us. The little voice at the back of our heads telling us that there is always someone better that us, that we're not enough or we're too much. This book didn't give me any answer or solution to any of my doubts, however I found some sort of comfort in knowing I'm not crazy and I'm not silly for having those thoughts.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Claire

    I absolutely tore through this book and thoroughly digested it along the way. Meg's writing is not only really beautiful, it's funny and witty and captures a sense of being that comes with being in your twenties. Reading PLACES I STOPPED ON THE WAY HOME felt like sitting down with a bottle of wine (or three) and getting to know someone. I absolutely loved it. I absolutely tore through this book and thoroughly digested it along the way. Meg's writing is not only really beautiful, it's funny and witty and captures a sense of being that comes with being in your twenties. Reading PLACES I STOPPED ON THE WAY HOME felt like sitting down with a bottle of wine (or three) and getting to know someone. I absolutely loved it.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Ellie

    This book, this book, this book. I have so much to say about it and so many words bouncing around in my head about the goodness of it. I’ve been walking around the last few days feeling in a bit of a funk, because this book was so good that my world feels like it’s been tilted on its axis a bit. It’s deep and it’s heartwrenching and it is exactly the kind of memoir I’d like to write one day, except that one will be my own. It’s filled me with words and ideas and a million things I can’t name rig This book, this book, this book. I have so much to say about it and so many words bouncing around in my head about the goodness of it. I’ve been walking around the last few days feeling in a bit of a funk, because this book was so good that my world feels like it’s been tilted on its axis a bit. It’s deep and it’s heartwrenching and it is exactly the kind of memoir I’d like to write one day, except that one will be my own. It’s filled me with words and ideas and a million things I can’t name right now. I’ll have more thoughts about this soon, but for now I’ll leave you with what I wrote in my newsletter this morning: “I have nothing but good things to say about it. I copied a dozen quotes into my journal and will absolutely be returning to them. It’s a memoir of growing up and growing into yourself in New York City, of navigating the places you call home and of reconciling with friends and lovers and with your own mistakes. It’s definitely one of those books I’ll be recommending to all my friends. If you’ve read any of @hannahbrencher’s books, it has that same sort of literary feeling. Highly recommend.”

  21. 4 out of 5

    Frederike

    Heartbreaking account of the insecurities a woman befalls in her twenties while living in New York, especially poignant are her experiences with men and eating disorders

  22. 4 out of 5

    Grace

    Meg writes in the most gorgeous, delicious way. I related to every story in some way, despite never having been to New York... (full review to come on almostamazinggrace.co.uk)

  23. 5 out of 5

    Lauren Hockey

    I was really excited to get stuck into Meg's book after seeing reviews from both Laura Jane Williams - who appears in the book - and Emma Gannon, two outspoken, creative women I admire. Meg writes poetically and beautifully about her tumultuous twenties and her love-hate affair with New York. I did at times find it to be a little self-indulgent and chaotic, and I didn't always resonate with her experiences, but there's no doubt Meg is a enchanting storyteller and there is much to be savoured in I was really excited to get stuck into Meg's book after seeing reviews from both Laura Jane Williams - who appears in the book - and Emma Gannon, two outspoken, creative women I admire. Meg writes poetically and beautifully about her tumultuous twenties and her love-hate affair with New York. I did at times find it to be a little self-indulgent and chaotic, and I didn't always resonate with her experiences, but there's no doubt Meg is a enchanting storyteller and there is much to be savoured in the pages, especially her jaunt to Paris with her mother. Three stars awarded only because it didn't live up to expectations.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Madhumita Bharde

    So poetic. Practically every 10th line is a beautiful & profound quote. Dream of a debut.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Katie (readingwithkt)

    Do you ever read a book and think "I've read this at the wrong time"? That was me with Places I Stopped on the Way Home. Things I enjoyed about this book: - This was a refreshing memoir in the sense that it comes from the perspective of a 20-30 year old woman who lives in NYC. - In some ways this book reminded me of Dolly Alderton’s Everything I Know About Love, in the sense that it charts one woman’s romantic relationships and her own personal growth. - I really really appreciated her sharing so mu Do you ever read a book and think "I've read this at the wrong time"? That was me with Places I Stopped on the Way Home. Things I enjoyed about this book: - This was a refreshing memoir in the sense that it comes from the perspective of a 20-30 year old woman who lives in NYC. - In some ways this book reminded me of Dolly Alderton’s Everything I Know About Love, in the sense that it charts one woman’s romantic relationships and her own personal growth. - I really really appreciated her sharing so much of her personal journey and growth, with so much vulnerability and class. In particular, some of her insights into loneliness in your 20s and her experience of an eating disorder (see chapter called 57th and third) were so well written. - The second half of the book worked a lot better for me so I’m glad I continued to read this one. Things that didn’t work for me: - I found the structure didn’t work for me. It is classed as “essays”, however it reads more like a jumpy memoir, as each essay appears to be placed in chronological order, yet there are large spaces in between. - I struggled with Meg’s essays focusing on her sexual relationships. I didn’t feel connected to the men she meets as they were introduced and removed so quickly. I also felt she placed her sense of worth upon the men she meets and I kept wanting to step into the pages and shake her, tell her that her worth is not determined by her romantic relationships. I rated this 3⭐️. I think if I had read this at age 19-21, this book would have spoken more to me as there was a lot more turbulence in my life, as there is in Meg’s life during the period she writes about. So it could be a case of right book, wrong time, and therefore if this is one that interests you then give it a go and see what you think.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Keara

    I took it slow and steady with this one, and man oh man it was beautiful. I did my best to savor it - savor every story. Meg has a way of writing that makes it feel like she’s writing for you - for moments you’ve felt less than, for the tugging feeling of homesickness that feels as if it could pull you under, for all of the small things that, added up, create a full, beautiful life. I asked my library to buy this book so I could read it and ended up buying my own copy before I even finished, so I I took it slow and steady with this one, and man oh man it was beautiful. I did my best to savor it - savor every story. Meg has a way of writing that makes it feel like she’s writing for you - for moments you’ve felt less than, for the tugging feeling of homesickness that feels as if it could pull you under, for all of the small things that, added up, create a full, beautiful life. I asked my library to buy this book so I could read it and ended up buying my own copy before I even finished, so I could save every line that felt like it was written for me. I’m grateful that Meg has shared her voice and her heart and soul with us.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Deidra

    The author’s writing is unbelievably unique and charming and real. Her words are what make this book excellent! It was also a quick read. I don’t like, though, that the book wouldn’t exist if it wasn’t for the men mentioned in this book. While reading, I couldn’t help but think of the lessons I’ve learned in my life. My short life has provided me many lessons, albeit, many I’ve learned from dating, I would like to think that what I’ve learned about myself and others and the world and life (etc. The author’s writing is unbelievably unique and charming and real. Her words are what make this book excellent! It was also a quick read. I don’t like, though, that the book wouldn’t exist if it wasn’t for the men mentioned in this book. While reading, I couldn’t help but think of the lessons I’ve learned in my life. My short life has provided me many lessons, albeit, many I’ve learned from dating, I would like to think that what I’ve learned about myself and others and the world and life (etc. etc.) stem more from who I am than who I am with a partner. Essentially bummed that a majority of these essays were excellently written, but all written about men.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Riley

    Read in one sitting. Just like Meg's blog, the writing is deceptively fluid -- like a river, it flows quickly but has immense depth. Though her life experiences are quite different from mine, I feel a kinship with her, because we seem to think and feel similarly. (Also, thanks to this ebook I found out that we grew up in the same area!) Most of all, I found myself tearing up when reading about the kind of love and the kind of man she seeks. Because all the things she describes as perfect, as the Read in one sitting. Just like Meg's blog, the writing is deceptively fluid -- like a river, it flows quickly but has immense depth. Though her life experiences are quite different from mine, I feel a kinship with her, because we seem to think and feel similarly. (Also, thanks to this ebook I found out that we grew up in the same area!) Most of all, I found myself tearing up when reading about the kind of love and the kind of man she seeks. Because all the things she describes as perfect, as the best? I have that with my husband. And she's right, it's perfect, it's the best.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Lexie Frensley

    Although an avid blog reader, I never got into Meg Fee's blog and picked up her book in hopes that it would give me some background on her story and how she has attracted such a sincere, loving following. The book read like her blog -- I kept wondering, okay, who IS she? There is very little backstory on her personality (other than that she is sad, lonely, attractive, etc.) or her time at Julliard. It's a love story to New York but I can't really figure out what she did there besides date men. I Although an avid blog reader, I never got into Meg Fee's blog and picked up her book in hopes that it would give me some background on her story and how she has attracted such a sincere, loving following. The book read like her blog -- I kept wondering, okay, who IS she? There is very little backstory on her personality (other than that she is sad, lonely, attractive, etc.) or her time at Julliard. It's a love story to New York but I can't really figure out what she did there besides date men. I think this book was written for her original fans, but as a hopeful convert, I was let down.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Katie

    Beautiful writing. Deep sentiments. “Give yourself permission to not be good at something. To write messy and imperfect words. To kiss a boy in the bar for no reason other than you want to. To let your legs shake during yoga. Stop apologizing for your height, for wanting to wear heels, for the actual space you take up in the world. Stand up straight. Uncross your arms. Regard as much as you can with awe." Beautiful writing. Deep sentiments. “Give yourself permission to not be good at something. To write messy and imperfect words. To kiss a boy in the bar for no reason other than you want to. To let your legs shake during yoga. Stop apologizing for your height, for wanting to wear heels, for the actual space you take up in the world. Stand up straight. Uncross your arms. Regard as much as you can with awe."

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