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Phryne Fisher is doing one of her favorite things --dancing at the Green Mill (Melbourne's premier dance hall) to the music of Tintagel Stone's Jazzmakers, the band who taught St Vitus how to dance. And she's wearing a sparkling lobelia-coloured georgette dress. Nothing can flap the unflappable Phryne--especially on a dance floor with so many delectable partners. Nothing e Phryne Fisher is doing one of her favorite things --dancing at the Green Mill (Melbourne's premier dance hall) to the music of Tintagel Stone's Jazzmakers, the band who taught St Vitus how to dance. And she's wearing a sparkling lobelia-coloured georgette dress. Nothing can flap the unflappable Phryne--especially on a dance floor with so many delectable partners. Nothing except death, that is. The dance competition is trailing into its last hours when suddenly, in the middle of "Bye Bye Blackbird" a figure slumps to the ground. No shot was heard. Phryne, conscious of how narrowly the missile missed her own bare shoulder, back, and dress, investigates. This leads her into the dark smoky jazz clubs of Fitzroy, into the arms of eloquent strangers, and finally into the the sky, as she follows a complicated family tragedy of the great War and the damaged men who came back from ANZAC cove. Phryne flies her Gypsy Moth Rigel into the Autralian Alps, where she meets a hermit with a dog called Lucky and a wombat living under his bunk....and risks her life on the love between brothers.


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Phryne Fisher is doing one of her favorite things --dancing at the Green Mill (Melbourne's premier dance hall) to the music of Tintagel Stone's Jazzmakers, the band who taught St Vitus how to dance. And she's wearing a sparkling lobelia-coloured georgette dress. Nothing can flap the unflappable Phryne--especially on a dance floor with so many delectable partners. Nothing e Phryne Fisher is doing one of her favorite things --dancing at the Green Mill (Melbourne's premier dance hall) to the music of Tintagel Stone's Jazzmakers, the band who taught St Vitus how to dance. And she's wearing a sparkling lobelia-coloured georgette dress. Nothing can flap the unflappable Phryne--especially on a dance floor with so many delectable partners. Nothing except death, that is. The dance competition is trailing into its last hours when suddenly, in the middle of "Bye Bye Blackbird" a figure slumps to the ground. No shot was heard. Phryne, conscious of how narrowly the missile missed her own bare shoulder, back, and dress, investigates. This leads her into the dark smoky jazz clubs of Fitzroy, into the arms of eloquent strangers, and finally into the the sky, as she follows a complicated family tragedy of the great War and the damaged men who came back from ANZAC cove. Phryne flies her Gypsy Moth Rigel into the Autralian Alps, where she meets a hermit with a dog called Lucky and a wombat living under his bunk....and risks her life on the love between brothers.

30 review for The Green Mill Murder

  1. 4 out of 5

    Brenda

    The Green Mill was hosting a dance-a-thon, with the grand prize of a brand new car for the winning couple. Miss Phryne Fisher was there, dressed to kill and enjoying the company – although the torturous dance-a-thon wasn’t making her happy. When one of the male contestants suddenly collapsed, his partner fell to the floor in angst – the young couple who were left standing after over 42 hours of non-stop dancing were the winners. They also collapsed in sheer exhaustion. But the first man to hit t The Green Mill was hosting a dance-a-thon, with the grand prize of a brand new car for the winning couple. Miss Phryne Fisher was there, dressed to kill and enjoying the company – although the torturous dance-a-thon wasn’t making her happy. When one of the male contestants suddenly collapsed, his partner fell to the floor in angst – the young couple who were left standing after over 42 hours of non-stop dancing were the winners. They also collapsed in sheer exhaustion. But the first man to hit the floor was dead, right in front of Phryne. Shock reigned… 1920s Melbourne, where jazz was rife – and so it seemed was murder – Phryne was determined to discover the killer. Assisting her favourite Detective as he and his men struggled for leads, Phryne learned not all was as it seemed. And when one of the men who had been with her on the night disappeared, she wasn’t sure what to think. But it was meeting the missing person’s mother that gave Phryne her suspicions. She would get results – she always did. And if flying in her trusty Moth across the mountains of the Australian Alps was needed, she would do that too. The Green Mill Murder by Aussie author Kerry Greenwood is another entertaining historical mystery in the Phryne Fisher series. I love Ms. Greenwood’s work – the lighthearted fun of the mystery; Miss Phryne Fisher’s indomitable spirit and her love of everything “posh”; her kind heart and of course her sense of justice and always solving her mysteries. Highly recommended.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Magdalena aka A Bookaholic Swede

    The Green Mill Murder is book five in the Phryne Fisher series and you can read them as stand-alone's, although you probably will get a better insight into the characters by reading from the beginning. I have so far read all but one prior to this book, but I have also seen the TV-series. And, have you seen the TV-series will you definitely both have a familiar feeling reading these books, but also feel that so much is different. And, the one thing I miss most of all is the flirtatious relationsh The Green Mill Murder is book five in the Phryne Fisher series and you can read them as stand-alone's, although you probably will get a better insight into the characters by reading from the beginning. I have so far read all but one prior to this book, but I have also seen the TV-series. And, have you seen the TV-series will you definitely both have a familiar feeling reading these books, but also feel that so much is different. And, the one thing I miss most of all is the flirtatious relationship between Phryne and Detective Jack Robinson. In this book, at least he was present for a little while, although I would have loved for him to have had a larger part. As for the murder case at the Green Mill was it pretty easy to figure out how the man was murdered and I had an inkling to whom the murderer was. But, I was still a bit surprised when it all came together at the end. I may have guessed the murder weapon and the murderer, but I did have the whole picture. But, the part that I found myself liking the best was the later part of the book when Phryne flies into the Australian Alps looking for a man who wandered off years ago, left his family and civilization and become a hermit. The milieu that was described made me yearn to travel to Australia. As for the hermit, I did wonder how long it would take for Phryne to seduce him since well, she has a knack for that. Did she seduce him? Well, I guess you have to read the book since I'm not giving the answer away! The Green Mill Murder was an easygoing cozy mystery book, and I felt it was perfect for the moment. Sometimes I need something light between heavier books. And this worked like a charm! I want to thank the publisher for providing me with a free copy through NetGalley for an honest review!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Nicky

    This is what, by now, counts as a fairly typical story for Phryne, featuring two different lovers, some acts of derring-do, and little glimpses of the found-family going on with Ruth, Jane, Bert, Cec, the Butlers, Dot, and Phryne. Oh, and some very unpleasant people in society. Actually, I would quite like to see Phryne getting on with some people that she doesn’t want to sleep with and doesn’t despise, in her own social class… not that social class matters much to her; it just feels like a gap. This is what, by now, counts as a fairly typical story for Phryne, featuring two different lovers, some acts of derring-do, and little glimpses of the found-family going on with Ruth, Jane, Bert, Cec, the Butlers, Dot, and Phryne. Oh, and some very unpleasant people in society. Actually, I would quite like to see Phryne getting on with some people that she doesn’t want to sleep with and doesn’t despise, in her own social class… not that social class matters much to her; it just feels like a gap. The mystery itself is a bit odd, in this one: it’s not really about finding the murderer, just about proving someone innocent. Even though, in this instance, there was a murderer. I dislike the attitude in some detective novels where the person who dies is an awful person, so the detective doesn’t really want to find out who did it. You can’t run a business by deciding who you like and who you don’t — and murder isn’t any more acceptable when the dead person is not likeable. This book does include a few queer characters, very openly; it’s mostly dealt with casually, with pity for the situation they’re in and acceptance on Phryne’s part. But. Do they have to be stereotypes? Sigh. It also contains a wombat character, who is epic, and some really gorgeous descriptions of flying and the Australian outback. So… swings and roundabouts. I gather the TV show handles this one quite differently, and it’s the next one I have to watch, so that should be interesting. Originally posted here

  4. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    I've got to confess...I was very disappointed with this book. Usually Kerry Greenwood has a tight, clean, writing style, but this one was vague and all over the place. It seemed to be more of a showcase on the research that Ms. Greenwood did on 1920s jazz. In most mystery stories, it is common practice at the end of the book to actually solve the murder. But the murder is never solved! Instead, we are detoured to endure a sounding board for gay rights and a look into emotional abuse. That's fine I've got to confess...I was very disappointed with this book. Usually Kerry Greenwood has a tight, clean, writing style, but this one was vague and all over the place. It seemed to be more of a showcase on the research that Ms. Greenwood did on 1920s jazz. In most mystery stories, it is common practice at the end of the book to actually solve the murder. But the murder is never solved! Instead, we are detoured to endure a sounding board for gay rights and a look into emotional abuse. That's fine and dandy, but I believe the entire Green Mill Murder (which the book is named for) could have been left out. The entire storyline of Nerine also adds nothing to the plot but fluff and filler. I love the Phryne books and will read them all, but it saddens me to have to be so critical of one of the books. If you're going to skip one, this is the one to pass over. Poorly written, political agendas and no resolution to the story. Sigh.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Heidi

    Nothing like a charming Phryne Fisher mystery to improve the day. This one was one of my favorites so far. Over the course of her investigation into a Jazz club murder, Phryne ends up out of her element which just shows how likable she is under all that sophistication.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Alice Lippart

    Delightful, as always.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Nicky

    This book wins for the wombat ex machina alone. Other than that, on a reread this felt a bit all over the place. There are two overlapping mysteries: one a murder, and one a disappearance. There’s two romances, one of which actually makes me feel kind of squicky inside now I think about it — it’s not often Phryne makes a judgement about who to sleep with that I really disagree with (heck, that’s the point of Phryne; she makes her own decisions)… but one of the two is certainly twisted in his mora This book wins for the wombat ex machina alone. Other than that, on a reread this felt a bit all over the place. There are two overlapping mysteries: one a murder, and one a disappearance. There’s two romances, one of which actually makes me feel kind of squicky inside now I think about it — it’s not often Phryne makes a judgement about who to sleep with that I really disagree with (heck, that’s the point of Phryne; she makes her own decisions)… but one of the two is certainly twisted in his morality, and Phryne does suspect that from the start. I don’t really get the appeal of him, either. All the same, the book features Phryne being the delight she always is. She protects a queer friend-of-a-friend from the attentions of the vice squad, flies a plane solo to find someone, makes her own decisions and puts her foot down when she has to. The found family are more in the background in this one, given that the high point (ha) of the book is Phryne’s solo flight and her time with a man who has made himself almost a hermit — but of course, they do feature. I’m left a bit befuddled by the way that the nastiness of people and their squiggly morality seems to be somewhat justified by the fact that it gives Nerine, a blues singer, some real blues to sing about. But I would like to hear her singing, from the descriptions… Originally posted on my blog.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Tracey

    Let's see, what was my history with Miss Fisher before this book … I adore the Corinna Chapman series, and was surprised and impressed by Out of the Black Land, set in ancient Egypt. I did not, however, much enjoy the first Phryne Fisher novel, Cocaine Blues, for some reason. I think it was just discomfiture with the utterly unique and I-don't-careness of Miss Fisher, and her way of breezing in, solving things, sleeping with any attractive man, and breezing out. Still, loving the author, I stock Let's see, what was my history with Miss Fisher before this book … I adore the Corinna Chapman series, and was surprised and impressed by Out of the Black Land, set in ancient Egypt. I did not, however, much enjoy the first Phryne Fisher novel, Cocaine Blues, for some reason. I think it was just discomfiture with the utterly unique and I-don't-careness of Miss Fisher, and her way of breezing in, solving things, sleeping with any attractive man, and breezing out. Still, loving the author, I stocked up on all the books, and have been nabbing them as often as possible on Netgalley. Oh, and I have been loving the Australian TV series, which is QUITE different in some ways. Looking for something reliable and quick, I landed on The Green Mill Murder, and – sure enough. I'm a convert. Phryne Fisher is marvellous. Kerry Greenwood, too. I have to get this out of the way first: I've not read the three books in between Cocaine and Green Mill, so I don't know how the novels treat the relationship between Miss Fisher and Robinson ("Call me Jack"), but in the TV series Jack doesn't say "ain't" and doesn't use double negatives. This is not that Jack. That took some getting used to. I missed him. (I was also a bit startled by the appearance of a Mrs. Butler, but not in a bad way.) And much as I enjoyed the episode based on this book, I’m kind of happy to say I enjoyed the book more. Characters' motivations were clearer, and the extra time I got to spend with them was appreciated. And there was no wombat in the episode. The adventure into the Australian Alps and Phryne's time there (note the tap-dancing to avoid spoilers) were wonderful. "I've got a dog and a horse and all the silence in the world." I want that … I really want that, "Lovely and high and far away". Oh well. I always seem to learn something from these books; the origins of the words "jazz" and "ragtime" here are nice little bonus tidbits. And I'd never heard of a baby car before – by heck, they were smaller than Mini Coopers, and much as I want one of those I've never been sure I'd feel safe in one. It's wonderful to have all those Phryne Fishers waiting for me. The usual disclaimer: I received this book via Netgalley for review.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Richard Derus

    Rating: 2.5* of five Okay, no adolescent girls in jeopardy this time, so I will continue reading the books. Phryne does, however, interact with two more stereotypes: The neurasthenic, crying gay interior decorator and the outdoorsy, rough lesbian couple. Try something a little less cardboard, Miss Greenwood. I am losing heart. The structure of the book isn't great. The eponymous murder takes place, is investigated, and left unresolved. I think I know who did it, but I have no idea why...or at least Rating: 2.5* of five Okay, no adolescent girls in jeopardy this time, so I will continue reading the books. Phryne does, however, interact with two more stereotypes: The neurasthenic, crying gay interior decorator and the outdoorsy, rough lesbian couple. Try something a little less cardboard, Miss Greenwood. I am losing heart. The structure of the book isn't great. The eponymous murder takes place, is investigated, and left unresolved. I think I know who did it, but I have no idea why...or at least none I can use as evidence in a court of law. Phryne's journey into the Australian Alps is memorably described. It's made to sound quite lyrical. I still want to read more of these, and I will until I figure out why, given all the complaints I have, I still want to read the books. Not particularly heartily recommended.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Anastasia

    The Green Mill murder by Kerry Greenwood is the 5th book in the Phryne Fisher Murder mystery series. Phryne is attending a dance competition at the Green Mill when one of the competitors is stabbed dead without anyone noticing anything. I enjoyed this book very much. I listened to the Audible versionwhich added to my enjoyment as the narrator did a wonderful job in bringing the different characters to life and also sung the jazz and blues songs. It also included an interview with the author at t The Green Mill murder by Kerry Greenwood is the 5th book in the Phryne Fisher Murder mystery series. Phryne is attending a dance competition at the Green Mill when one of the competitors is stabbed dead without anyone noticing anything. I enjoyed this book very much. I listened to the Audible versionwhich added to my enjoyment as the narrator did a wonderful job in bringing the different characters to life and also sung the jazz and blues songs. It also included an interview with the author at the end which gave us some insight of how the book came about and her inspirations for it. A terrific addition to the series.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Text Addict

    I'm wishing now that I wasn't reading these out of order, because this volume is much improved over the #2 and #3 that I have read. Greenwood slows down a bit in order to describe things more, and allow the characters (and readers) more time to absorb events rather than skip along just taking note of them. The Great War continues to be a background theme - much as it was to Australian life at the time (the 1920s), I'm sure. It's more directly so here, as one of the key characters "had a bad war, I'm wishing now that I wasn't reading these out of order, because this volume is much improved over the #2 and #3 that I have read. Greenwood slows down a bit in order to describe things more, and allow the characters (and readers) more time to absorb events rather than skip along just taking note of them. The Great War continues to be a background theme - much as it was to Australian life at the time (the 1920s), I'm sure. It's more directly so here, as one of the key characters "had a bad war," as was the oblique way of putting it. With this man, the other major characters, and a number of minor characters all given enough time and attention to be a bit more (or a lot more) than ciphers, the book is definitely reaching for a higher level of quality than I found in the earlier volumes. Also, Greenwood finally brought up a topic that I was unsettled by not finding in the earlier books: birth control. Phryne does own a diaphragm, which (I looked it up) was in fact invented in the early 20th century and would have been available to a well-off young woman like Phryne. Unfortunately, one of the mysteries goes unsolved or at least unexplained - I'm still not sure who murdered the guy at the Green Mill club. It was the other mystery, of the disappearing son and brother, that was thoroughly solved. I could wish, though, that the sudden villain at the end had given a few more indications that he was headed that way. But there is a wombat. I could give the book an extra half-star just for the wombat.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Maggie Anton

    The series is getting better with each book. The characters in this one really came to life, and I appreciated how the realities of WW1 came into it. One BIG problem for those reading the hardcover version - THE LAST CHAPTER IS MISSING. Thus I only found out the murderer's identity and motive by reading Goodreads reviews. The publisher will send a pdf of the final chapter if a readers emails them for it, but I didn't know this until later.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jazzy Lemon

    In this book it is 1928 and Phryne is attending a dance marathon when on the second day, one of the dancers collapses - dead! But not from exhaustion. With a murderer afoot, Phryne takes on the case, as well as the case of finding a jazz singer's husband, flying in her Gypsy Moth Rigel, and still finds the time to study the then short history of jazz. Accompanied with many quotes by the great W. C. Handy, who is known as 'The Father of the Blues'.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Anna

    A very clever mystery. The main family Phryne works with here are just so unpleasant that it was not quite as fun a read.

  15. 4 out of 5

    eyes.2c

    Phryne flies high! Phryne is attending a dance marathon at a jazz club with 'a tedious but socially acceptable escort', Charles Freeman. Tintagel Stone the band leader leader and banjo player has a delectable pair of blue eyes. The last two marathon couples are exhausted but still dancing. One stumbles and falls--never to rise again. Phryne is flung headlong into murder, blackmail, missing persons, and a brief liaison--or two, although lamenting from time to time her anarchist lover met in Death Phryne flies high! Phryne is attending a dance marathon at a jazz club with 'a tedious but socially acceptable escort', Charles Freeman. Tintagel Stone the band leader leader and banjo player has a delectable pair of blue eyes. The last two marathon couples are exhausted but still dancing. One stumbles and falls--never to rise again. Phryne is flung headlong into murder, blackmail, missing persons, and a brief liaison--or two, although lamenting from time to time her anarchist lover met in Death at Victoria Dock. The story ranges from St Kilda to the Australian Alps. Flying with Phyrne in her Tiger Moth through that area, up through Mansfield and on to Mount Howitt plains were highlights of the story. Having walked some of this area I was instantly transported back there, to the sights, smells and sounds. Thank you Kerry Greenwood! As Phyrne reflects when walking to a hut, 'this cold wilderness was utterly unfamiliar, but it did not feel hostile, just indifferent to her fate. If she fell off this path and was broken into a hundred pieces nothing up here would be one whit interested.' Here are places where some find solace and others inspiration. The descriptions of this part of the world and the people, priceless! As Phyne says, 'they did not talk much and therefore liked to give every word its proper weight. She reflected that a writer might find this touching. Words were seldom given the respect they deserved.' (I loved this last sentiment) The war references--Gallipoli and Pozières, and the effect of these battles on the veterans as always are stark reminders of the costs paid. Enjoyable as always. A NetGalley ARC

  16. 5 out of 5

    Maddie

    This book is the one that differs the MOST from an episode of the TV show (that I've read - and yes I get that it's only No. 5 but still). I purposely re-watched the episode before starting the audiobook (and stellar narration as always). The basic premise starts more or less the same - dancing at a Jazz club and witnessing a murder - and the method of the murder and the murderer are all the same but that's pretty much where the similarities end. There are of course many side plots in the story This book is the one that differs the MOST from an episode of the TV show (that I've read - and yes I get that it's only No. 5 but still). I purposely re-watched the episode before starting the audiobook (and stellar narration as always). The basic premise starts more or less the same - dancing at a Jazz club and witnessing a murder - and the method of the murder and the murderer are all the same but that's pretty much where the similarities end. There are of course many side plots in the story that would not have fit into the show but the the main thing that stood out to me is that Phryne's partner Charles is MUCH more disagreeable in the book (and that does play a role in the plot). My favorite part is WOM <3 <3 <3

  17. 4 out of 5

    Stacie Haden

    I give 5 stars for the series. Standing alone it may not be a 5, but if read in order you become invested in the characters and delight in their successes. I like Phryne. She's clever, accomplished, trampy and she cares deeply for those deserving. She's just the right amount of "flawed" to be real and likeable. In fact, I think I'd like to be her. :) Ps. Don't tell anyone about the "trampy" side of me. :) Australia 1928

  18. 5 out of 5

    Bettie

    bettie's Books bettie's Books

  19. 5 out of 5

    Andree

    Quite liked this one as well. These are nice short, frothy reads. I can see why they changed the plotline of this particular mystery when they adapted it for TV though, (view spoiler)[the entire family was fairly awful. Charlie is weak, easily led, and tormented by his mother and not particularly lamentable after he dies in a self-inflicted accident, and his mother is quite the piece of work. The only one with any real virtue is Vic, the self-imposed hermit. (hide spoiler)] I do like a lot of the Quite liked this one as well. These are nice short, frothy reads. I can see why they changed the plotline of this particular mystery when they adapted it for TV though, (view spoiler)[the entire family was fairly awful. Charlie is weak, easily led, and tormented by his mother and not particularly lamentable after he dies in a self-inflicted accident, and his mother is quite the piece of work. The only one with any real virtue is Vic, the self-imposed hermit. (hide spoiler)] I do like a lot of the minor characters in this though.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Rbucci

    This book was all over the place with plots and story lines. I had the murder figured out early. Worth reading to keep up with all the characters, though.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Alex

    I would like a pet wombat please!! Really liked this one, I thought it explored more of Phryne's psyche which was interesting!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Bryan Higgs

    I discovered this series a while ago, and they are rather a lot of fun. The protagonist, Phryne Fisher is an interesting and definitely risqué character who solves murders which seem to happen quite a bit around her -- rather like many detectives in the literature. The location is interesting -- Melbourne, Australia -- as is the timeframe -- post WW1. The writing is quite entertaining, and the plots interesting -- on the whole, a good, light read. My wife and I have been enjoying the "Miss Fisher I discovered this series a while ago, and they are rather a lot of fun. The protagonist, Phryne Fisher is an interesting and definitely risqué character who solves murders which seem to happen quite a bit around her -- rather like many detectives in the literature. The location is interesting -- Melbourne, Australia -- as is the timeframe -- post WW1. The writing is quite entertaining, and the plots interesting -- on the whole, a good, light read. My wife and I have been enjoying the "Miss Fisher's Murder Mysteries" (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1988386/), from the Australian Broadcasting Network, and this book is one that was represented in the first TV series. (There is apparently already a second series available on Netflix; I don't know whether any of the major TV networks will pick it up, but it's a worthy contender.) The comparison between this book and its TV equivalent is interesting. Of course, the sex scenes are omitted from the TV version. As you might suspect, the two start off with the same murder, in the same location, etc. and both have parallel investigations, but the book (as usual) is much more satisfying for its greater depth -- they diverge at the end. One observation: As far as I can recall, the book never completely explains the details of how the murder was committed, nor the perpetrator (although we think we know), while the TV episode does. I find these books, and the TV series, quite entertaining. The TV series does a great job of capturing the spirit of the period, with jazz music and great costumes and characters. On to the next Phryne Fisher mystery...

  23. 4 out of 5

    Marlene

    Originally published at Reading Reality When I either run out of time, or get full-up on serious, I turn to one of my go-to authors and series. At the moment, that’s Kerry Greenwood and her Phryne Fisher series. Kerry and Phryne always deliver a great, fun, can’t-put-it-down mystery, and that is certainly the case in The Green Mill Murder. There’s also just a bit more serious in this one than I expected, but in an utterly marvelous way. As always, this episode of Phryne’s story begins with a murder Originally published at Reading Reality When I either run out of time, or get full-up on serious, I turn to one of my go-to authors and series. At the moment, that’s Kerry Greenwood and her Phryne Fisher series. Kerry and Phryne always deliver a great, fun, can’t-put-it-down mystery, and that is certainly the case in The Green Mill Murder. There’s also just a bit more serious in this one than I expected, but in an utterly marvelous way. As always, this episode of Phryne’s story begins with a murder. Detective Inspector Jack Robinson is correct, Phryne should be charged with aiding and abetting, because corpses seem to appear wherever she goes. In this particular case, the corpse is that of a contestant in a dance marathon contest. While the poor man was literally killing his feet, no one expected that particular kind of death to climb up and stick a knife in his chest. Dance marathons were potentially deadly enough without throwing knives into the mix. But as soon as the body drops next to Phryne she is on the case. And as much as she dislikes the cause, all too glad to be shed of her odious date. Even though he does a bunk when the police arrive. She doesn’t mind dealing with the cops herself, far from it, but is does make the bastard look guilty of something, and she’s just sure (correctly) that she’ll be stuck getting him out of it, as well as solving the murder. And so she does. But it is a very, very pretty puzzle, albeit a deadly one. The other dancers were too far away to drive a knife into the poor man’s chest. His dance partner, after 47 hours on her feet, was too far out of it to do it either, even if she had a motive, which she didn’t. The band members were visibly much too far away, as was the somewhat ghoulishly spectating crowd. So who killed the extremely dead dancer? As Phryne dives into the lives of everyone involved, she finds that there were plenty of motives for killing the deceased, and plenty of people in the room who wanted him dead. Which doesn’t solve the crime, because none of them were remotely close enough to do the deed. So who did? And how did they do it? Phryne has to fly far, far out into the silent emptiness of the Australian Bush to find the answers. But no matter how far she travels, or how dark the secrets she uncovers, she can’t manage to escape from the spider who has successfully spun this particular web. Escape Rating A-: I have been reading, reviewing and absolutely enjoying this series in order, beginning with Cocaine Blues, and continuing through Flying Too High, Murder on the Ballarat Train and Death at Victoria Dock. I didn’t get around to reviewing Victoria Dock – like Phryne so often is, I was traveling, And since I purchased the book, I didn’t feel obligated to write a review. But I definitely enjoyed it. But as much as I liked Death at Victoria Dock, it wasn’t particularly special as far as Phryne is concerned. Not that Phryne herself isn’t very special. The Green Mill Murder, on the other hand, was quite special, even for Phryne. Not so much about the murder, or even the actual solution, but the lengths and places that Phryne has to go to solve it. Much of the story is taken up with Phryne’s solo flight from Melbourne to Mount Howitt in the Australian Alps. While today Victoria is the second-most populous state on the Australian mainland, in the 1920s, Gippsland, the rural area that Phryne needs to visit, was far into the Bush. Also airplanes were much more of a curiosity (and a relatively dangerous mode of travel) in the 1920s than they are today. Phryne’s solo flight is so dangerous that she refuses to take a co-pilot in her tiny, flimsy, Moth Rigel. There are no airports where she’s headed. She has to arrange in advance both for fuel drops and for windsocks to be put up so she knows which direction to come in. One of those windsocks turns out to be an actual sock. She’s flying into an area that seldom sees strangers, and may never have seen an airplane, let alone a female aviatrix. There is no such thing as instrument flight, or pressurized cabins. Phryne is exposed to the elements, and must negotiate between flying low enough both to see her landmarks on the ground and maintain her own oxygen, and yet not be so low that she flies into clouds, sudden fog, or even more disastrously, a mountain. Any and all of which are all too possible, and equally deadly. Phryne’s combination of the lyrical joys of her solo flight combined with the practicality of her preparations reminded me more than a bit of Beryl Markham’s West with the Night. But the place that Phryne has to visit, the Bush towns and great emptiness of the Australian Alps, provide a fascinating portrait of a time and place that is still less than a century away, but has vanished into the mists of time. It was a lovely visit. Of course Phryne solves the mystery, as she always does, and in her own rather unique fashion. But it’s the lyricism of her solo flight and her reactions to the great quiet places that will stick with me for a long time to come. That and the wombat ex machina who saves the day.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Diabolika

    I liked the story. I met again my usual Phryne: sparkling, witty and shameless! "Bear up, man, it is not the dead you have to be afraid of. The living are much more dangerous." "That being so, I shall put myself to bed. Pity there's no one in it but me, but there it is." I was glad Inspector Robinson (dear Jack) was a bit more present. I enjoyed their funny conversations. A little shame about the end, too fast and without a clear explanation of the murder. I liked the story. I met again my usual Phryne: sparkling, witty and shameless! "Bear up, man, it is not the dead you have to be afraid of. The living are much more dangerous." "That being so, I shall put myself to bed. Pity there's no one in it but me, but there it is." I was glad Inspector Robinson (dear Jack) was a bit more present. I enjoyed their funny conversations. A little shame about the end, too fast and without a clear explanation of the murder.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Ken Fredette

    This was the best book so far for Phryne Fisher. It was changed drastically from the book for the TV story. I love to watch the TV version anyway 6 or 7 times.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Noora

    For a murder mystery, it was both boring and predictable. Weakest installment in the series so far.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Elaine White

    Book – The Green Mill Murder (Miss Phryne Fisher #5) Author – Kerry Greenwood Star rating - ★★☆☆☆ No. of Pages – 173 Cover – Cute POV – 3rd person, multi-POV, omni-present Would I read it again – No Genre – Historical, Crime, Australian, Murder Mystery Content Warning – shell-shock, gay relationships, PTSD, graphic details of war ** COPY RECEIVED THROUGH NETGALLEY ** For a while, I thought this was going to be my favourite of the series so far, then it flipped on its head and became my least favourite of Book – The Green Mill Murder (Miss Phryne Fisher #5) Author – Kerry Greenwood Star rating - ★★☆☆☆ No. of Pages – 173 Cover – Cute POV – 3rd person, multi-POV, omni-present Would I read it again – No Genre – Historical, Crime, Australian, Murder Mystery Content Warning – shell-shock, gay relationships, PTSD, graphic details of war ** COPY RECEIVED THROUGH NETGALLEY ** For a while, I thought this was going to be my favourite of the series so far, then it flipped on its head and became my least favourite of the series so far. It started by getting straight to the murder on page one, but at the same time, it also immediately started with formatting issues and page numbers, the author's name, and random numbers appearing halfway through paragraphs, scenes, and pages. Instead of the usual page break, there was a repeated appearance of '999', which I assume was a badly/miss-formatted scene break. The first half of the book was great; it felt fresh, well written, with an intriguing murder case to solve, and plenty of interesting characters. Then, for no reason I can see, halfway through it became something completely different. It began to change the moment Phryne admitted that she knew who the killer was at 50% and wasn't going to tell anyone. She flew off for a week, to search for a missing PTSD-riddled soldier, who she admitted should have been left alone. In the end, all her visit resulted in was the signing of legal papers that could have been sent to him in another way, and yet another love affair that wasn't necessary. It really frustrated me that Phryne views every man she sees as either “yes, I'll sleep with him” or “No, I'm not interested” – even going to visit this self-isolated person, this self-exiled man, who is riddled with PTSD from the war and wants nothing but to be alone and surrounded by silence, yet when Phryne goes to visit him, we get this little gold-mine of self-importance: “One of the goodies she had brought along was her diaphragm. One never knew.” I literally rolled my eyes at this. The more I read about Phryne, the more I see that she's only ever interested in sex, that she's self-absorbed, self-obsessed, and obsessed with sex. She's all ego, very little actual investigative skill, and buys most of her clues through Cec and Burt, or gets them through pillow talk. There were long, laborious pages and chapters about flying and scenery that weren't necessary and that I ended up skimming after a while. It ruined the good points of the first half of the book, drifting into endless and often pointless mass dumps of description about the mountains, the weather, flying, and sexcapades that weren't needed to show that Phyrne was a modern woman. And, while I appreciate a semi-positive showing of gay men, I did find that they were stereotyped. Honestly, at this point, I feel like I've given the series a good run, a decent attempt, and an opportunity to improve. For me, it's only gotten worse with each book. If I wasn't bound to complete the series for review, I doubt I would have even bothered to get this far, but I certainly wouldn't go further. The fact that the book ends with Phryne willing to let a killer and an accomplice go free, just because she didn't like the victim, really rubbed me up the wrong way. She was willing to let an accomplice go free because she slept with him. She let a killer remain free for an entire week, while she went off to fly to see Vic, with no idea and no care if anyone else got hurt in her absence, because she didn't speak up. She knew who the killer was at 45%, yet did nothing until 90%. ~

  28. 5 out of 5

    Avid Series Reader

    The Green Mill Murder by Kerry Greenwood is the 5th book of the Phryne Fisher mystery series set in 1920s Australia. Phryne is a quite modern-thinking, independent woman. Her attitude is facilitated a great deal by her amazing wealth. She can have or do anything she wants. She's dancing to jazz music at the Green Mill during a dance marathon, when one of the contestants drops dead at her feet. Charles, her dance partner, is extremely upset and flees. Phryne observes the corpse was stabbed with a The Green Mill Murder by Kerry Greenwood is the 5th book of the Phryne Fisher mystery series set in 1920s Australia. Phryne is a quite modern-thinking, independent woman. Her attitude is facilitated a great deal by her amazing wealth. She can have or do anything she wants. She's dancing to jazz music at the Green Mill during a dance marathon, when one of the contestants drops dead at her feet. Charles, her dance partner, is extremely upset and flees. Phryne observes the corpse was stabbed with a stiletto. Without Charles around, Phryne is free to flirt with (eventually seduce) the band leader. Charles not only fled the dance floor, he cannot be found - by police or his mother. Phryne somewhat reluctantly agrees to find Charles for his mother. She's more intrigued by learning that Charles has an older brother Victor, who served in WWI, returned home shell-shocked, and fled to the mountains for "the great silence". From his photo, Phryne (and her faithful sidekick Dot) agree that Vic has a very dependable face (if not handsome). Phryne and Dot check records to determine Vic's whereabouts. Meanwhile Phryne investigates Charles' friends, to locate him. Charles gets arrested; Phryne knows he isn't a killer, but she doesn't care if the murderer is caught, because the victim was a blackmailer. Phryne thinks Vic was treated unfairly by his mother., so she takes off flying her Gipsy Moth 2-seater into the mountains to find him, shrugging off all warnings of danger. She succeeds in her quest, seduces Victor, then becomes bored within 3 days. Phryne plays benefactress, bestowing whatever she thinks the less-privileged need (whether or not they want it). She genuinely does good deeds, while having the time of her life, wearing stunning clothes, seducing any man who attracts her, and racing around in her Hispano-Suiza roadster. Phryne is so egotistical, she asks Vic if he is sure he wants to make love to her, because it might break his heart when she leaves.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Catherine

    I really loved whole sections of this, so let's go with 3.5 as a rating. This is one mystery series where I think the television version is better than the books, in part because the books are pretty short and attempt to pack in a ridiculous amount of plot for their length. That said, this one isn't particularly interesting as a mystery and there's a fair number of loose threads at the end, but the bits where Phryne is flying her plane and spending time out in the bush are lush and glorious. And I really loved whole sections of this, so let's go with 3.5 as a rating. This is one mystery series where I think the television version is better than the books, in part because the books are pretty short and attempt to pack in a ridiculous amount of plot for their length. That said, this one isn't particularly interesting as a mystery and there's a fair number of loose threads at the end, but the bits where Phryne is flying her plane and spending time out in the bush are lush and glorious. And I love the historical details in the series. Recommended for a nice light read, with a bonus wombat and some lovely scenery.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Sadie Slater

    Book series often improve as they go on. In this, the fifth of Kerry Greenwood's Phryne Fisher books, the change feels more like a step-change than an incremental change. It's still an enjoyable murder mystery, but it felt less fluffy to me than the earlier books; Phryne's emotions have more depth to them, the characters she encounters have more depth, and the descriptions of the Australian Alps convey a sense of place that was completely lacking from Phryne's previous adventures. My favourite o Book series often improve as they go on. In this, the fifth of Kerry Greenwood's Phryne Fisher books, the change feels more like a step-change than an incremental change. It's still an enjoyable murder mystery, but it felt less fluffy to me than the earlier books; Phryne's emotions have more depth to them, the characters she encounters have more depth, and the descriptions of the Australian Alps convey a sense of place that was completely lacking from Phryne's previous adventures. My favourite of the series so far.

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