counter create hit How Ronald Reagan Changed My Life - Download Free eBook
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

How Ronald Reagan Changed My Life

Availability: Ready to download

As a young speechwriter in the Reagan White House, Peter Robinson was responsible for the celebrated "Mr. Gorbachev, tear down this wall" speech. He was also one of a core group of writers who became informal experts on Reagan -- watching his every move, absorbing not just his political positions, but his personality, manner, and the way he carried himself. In How Ronald As a young speechwriter in the Reagan White House, Peter Robinson was responsible for the celebrated "Mr. Gorbachev, tear down this wall" speech. He was also one of a core group of writers who became informal experts on Reagan -- watching his every move, absorbing not just his political positions, but his personality, manner, and the way he carried himself. In How Ronald Reagan Changed My Life, Robinson draws on journal entries from his days at the White House, as well as interviews with those who knew the president best, to reveal ten life lessons he learned from the fortieth president -- a great yet ordinary man who touched the individuals around him as surely as he did his millions of admirers around the world.


Compare
Ads Banner

As a young speechwriter in the Reagan White House, Peter Robinson was responsible for the celebrated "Mr. Gorbachev, tear down this wall" speech. He was also one of a core group of writers who became informal experts on Reagan -- watching his every move, absorbing not just his political positions, but his personality, manner, and the way he carried himself. In How Ronald As a young speechwriter in the Reagan White House, Peter Robinson was responsible for the celebrated "Mr. Gorbachev, tear down this wall" speech. He was also one of a core group of writers who became informal experts on Reagan -- watching his every move, absorbing not just his political positions, but his personality, manner, and the way he carried himself. In How Ronald Reagan Changed My Life, Robinson draws on journal entries from his days at the White House, as well as interviews with those who knew the president best, to reveal ten life lessons he learned from the fortieth president -- a great yet ordinary man who touched the individuals around him as surely as he did his millions of admirers around the world.

30 review for How Ronald Reagan Changed My Life

  1. 5 out of 5

    Siera

    I was six years old when Ronald Reagan died, and I didn't understand why my family cared about a man we didn't know and who wasn't even the current President. This book gave me a little more insight into why Ronald Reagan mattered to my family and to America. I came upon this little treasure in a thrift store. Because it was about Ronald Reagan, I picked it up, not knowing anything else about it. I loved it. The book is basically a collection of lessons that Peter Robinson learned as one of I was six years old when Ronald Reagan died, and I didn't understand why my family cared about a man we didn't know and who wasn't even the current President. This book gave me a little more insight into why Ronald Reagan mattered to my family and to America. I came upon this little treasure in a thrift store. Because it was about Ronald Reagan, I picked it up, not knowing anything else about it. I loved it. The book is basically a collection of lessons that Peter Robinson learned as one of President Reagan's speechwriters. I expected a little bit more information about Ronald Reagan himself and less about Mr. Robinson, but I enjoyed both aspects of the book, as well as the snippets we see of the interior workings in the White House. If you're looking for a biography of Ronald Reagan's life, this is not the book for you. But if you're looking for information on the principles that Ronald Reagan founded his life on, this is a wonderful source. This book increased my interest in the life of Ronald Reagan, and now I want to read his autobiography. This book was a pleasure to read. I enjoyed all of the anecdotes and examples Mr. Robinson used to show and not just tell us the lessons President Reagan taught him. I also enjoyed Mr. Robinson's descriptions of his own life. His style is fun and comfortable to read, and I would recommend this book to anyone, but especially to those like myself who weren't born until after Reagan's time and who may not realize why he matters. He matters because he was a man who unabashedly believed in God, believed in doing what was right, and believed in America. More important than just believing, he acted on his beliefs. He lived his beliefs, and Mr. Robinson just stated them after the fact.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Martha Ware

    I picked up this book because I didn't know a thing about Ronald Reagan and wondered why people talked about the guy like he was God or something. This author does just that. I guess he is God. Hmmm. Lots to ponder here. No, but seriously, he sounds like a kind man, and actually was a very remarkable (and unlikely) president. Makes me want to read his bio as well as his wife's.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Garry Wilmore

    The author was one of President Reagan's speechwriters, and I read this book sometime around April of 2004, which proved to be timely because the former President passed away in June of that year, shortly after I finished the book. Reagan had what we might call a charmed life; it was long, well and completely lived, and spectacularly successful, too. The keys to his success were, to a very large degree, his character and temperament, which the author studied carefully and summarized in the The author was one of President Reagan's speechwriters, and I read this book sometime around April of 2004, which proved to be timely because the former President passed away in June of that year, shortly after I finished the book. Reagan had what we might call a charmed life; it was long, well and completely lived, and spectacularly successful, too. The keys to his success were, to a very large degree, his character and temperament, which the author studied carefully and summarized in the chapters of this book. (Parenthetically, he even notes that Reagan had a natural golf swing that was nearly perfect.) Robinson devotes an entire chapter to one pivotal moment in Reagan's Presidency, which seemed far more important and prescient in retrospect than it did at the time: his challenge to Mikhail Gorbachev, issued in the shadow of the Brandenburg Gate, to "tear down this wall." From my own perspective, I vividly recall that speech, which was given in June, 1987; what a powerful sentiment, I thought, but too bad there was no chance of seeing it fulfilled, at least in my lifetime. But down came the Berlin Wall, a short 2-1/2 years after Reagan gave the speech, and near the end of the year he left office. His advisers almost unanimously insisted that he omit the line from his prepared speech, but Reagan, a man of conviction and principle, insisted that it be left in. Peter Robinson wrote the speech, complete with the controversial line; and even now, whenever I listen to it on YouTube, it continues to thrill and amaze me. This one is on my short list of books worth rereading, although I haven't gotten around to doing so yet. But I have encouraged my children to read it. My son did so about four years ago, when he was about 16; my daughter, who is 15 when I write this review in the summer of 2009, hasn't done so yet, but I hope she will.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Stephen

    I remember hearing about this book when it first came out and thinking "Great. Another book saying how great Reagan was that people will write off as hero worship by Republicans." On a recent Ricochet podcast, the hosts mentioned how to get a free audiobook from audible.com and that Robinson's book was read by him, with audio excerpts of Reagan where he is quoted. Since I've become an admirer of Robinson's through Uncommon Knowledge, I decided I'd use my freebie to download this book. Robinson I remember hearing about this book when it first came out and thinking "Great. Another book saying how great Reagan was that people will write off as hero worship by Republicans." On a recent Ricochet podcast, the hosts mentioned how to get a free audiobook from audible.com and that Robinson's book was read by him, with audio excerpts of Reagan where he is quoted. Since I've become an admirer of Robinson's through Uncommon Knowledge, I decided I'd use my freebie to download this book. Robinson himself says the book is kind of a "love letter" to Reagan, but it's not an outright hagiography of the president. He shares ten important lessons he learned from Reagan and it reads as a warm portrait of a mentor - who just happened to be the leader of the free world. Each chapter of the book focuses on a life lesson Robinson took from his time in the White House. Some of these include finding the good in the bad, do the work you are intended to do, act now, what you say matters, and take things in stride. Each one of these items is backed up by anecdotes from Robinson or from other former Reagan staffers who he interviewed. Those interested in the "Tear Down This Wall" speech should pay close attention to chapter 4, it is a detailed behind-the-scenes look at how that speech came to be. The book is written in an easy, conversational style. Since Robinson reads the book himself, it has the effect of a witty, urbane friend over for a dinner party, regaling you with interesting stories for hours on end. I can't tell you how many times he had me laughing out loud. Recommended and so is the audio version.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Peter

    This was actually a very good book! Like many, I dismissed Reagan as an amiable dunce, but after reading Robinson's book, I've changed my mind, at least somewhat. Robinson was hired right our of university to be speech writer for the VP, but somehow he went to work for Reagan in the White House. It is more of a look back by a much more mature man, telling the story of his earlier self. In laying out the various ways that Reagan changed his life, he sheds light on Reagan, his personality, work This was actually a very good book! Like many, I dismissed Reagan as an amiable dunce, but after reading Robinson's book, I've changed my mind, at least somewhat. Robinson was hired right our of university to be speech writer for the VP, but somehow he went to work for Reagan in the White House. It is more of a look back by a much more mature man, telling the story of his earlier self. In laying out the various ways that Reagan changed his life, he sheds light on Reagan, his personality, work ethic, foreign policy etc and left me with a lot of respect for Reagan's view (and his respect for) the common people, a respect that is certainly missing from the Washington (and Ottawa) crowd today. He is not afraid to tackle the thorny questions about Reagan and whether or not he was an architect of the collapse of USSR, and this is where I disagree with him the most. He paints a very sympathetic picture of Reagan after he leaves the White House and starts to show signs of Alzheimers, the disease that killed him. Even if you dismissed Reagan as the amiable dunce, mere tool of those around him, and perhaps especially if that is your view, you should read this book for an entirely different and very thoughtful view.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Brian Albrecht

    I can't speak highly enough about this book. I first listened to the audiobook for a class project. Peter Robinson's conversational style and insight into so many topics required that I read the whole book. After driving to a library 40 minutes away I had the book. Finished in no time, the book is everything a young man like myself could want in a book. The history of the Reagan years is brief but insightful. It reflects on Reagan's life. A man at the end of his life, Reagan has so much to teach I can't speak highly enough about this book. I first listened to the audiobook for a class project. Peter Robinson's conversational style and insight into so many topics required that I read the whole book. After driving to a library 40 minutes away I had the book. Finished in no time, the book is everything a young man like myself could want in a book. The history of the Reagan years is brief but insightful. It reflects on Reagan's life. A man at the end of his life, Reagan has so much to teach young men. It reflects on Peter Robinson's life, then in his 40's and just starting a family. He talks about the issues he had as a 20 something finding his way in the world while being in the Reagan White House. For a almost college grad, his concerns are my concerns and he taught me a lot. I loved the book so much I already bought a new version of the book. This is almost unheard of for me since I am cheap and prefer used. However, I know I will keep looking back to this book for guidance, history and entertainment for years to come. Truly a near perfect book for this point in my life.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Gil Bradshaw

    This book is fantastic. I read this book to get ideas for my graduation speech, and it didn't work, but it did get me thinking about speeches in general. I really enjoy reading and listening to conservative thinkers who are intellectually impressive. I am totally moderate and it seems some of the most heartening, humanistic, and empathetic writers are on the left. So I really enjoy when a conservative can move me to tears. Robinson did just that. Robinson documents Reagan's tenure through his This book is fantastic. I read this book to get ideas for my graduation speech, and it didn't work, but it did get me thinking about speeches in general. I really enjoy reading and listening to conservative thinkers who are intellectually impressive. I am totally moderate and it seems some of the most heartening, humanistic, and empathetic writers are on the left. So I really enjoy when a conservative can move me to tears. Robinson did just that. Robinson documents Reagan's tenure through his speeches. He also discusses Reagan's life. I am convinced that this book is riddled with historical inaccuracies, and assumptions about what Reagan was thinking and why he did some of the things that he did. In spite of those glaring errors, this book was fantastic. It was great for those of us who can't seem to comprehend the myriad of complex financial, social, and historical issues that occurred during Reagan's tenure.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Dale

    A book about character and Ronald Reagan. If I recommend a self-help book to anyone, this is the book. Peter Robinson was a young speechwriter for the Reagan White House. He lays out his days at he White House and what life lessons he learned from the fortieth president. If you never heard of Ronald Reagan then reading this book will introduce you to an incredible man. If you remember Ronald Reagan then you will learn more and be that much more admired of the man who represented so much more.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Candy

    Endearing portrayal of Reagan the man. Peter Robinson writes in an engaging, rather chatty and conversational style about someone he unabashedly adored. It's a mix of Robinson's life and Reagan's with many memorable stories.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Coleen

    Sometimes I couldn't stop laughing. Robinson is after all, a comedic writer. Superb analysis of what made the Great Communicator great. Plus he shows us how to scrutinize our heroes in order to emulate their best qualities.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Nancy

    Peter Robinson was one of President Reagan's speech writers. He shares life changing principles from President Reagan that he adopted for his own life. President Reagan certainly was a disciplined, decisive man. A great presidetn

  12. 5 out of 5

    Ryan

    A quick and easy read - contains some great "behind the scenes" anecdotes about Reagan. Also is instructive as Robinson re-tells how his young life was shaped by his time working for Reagan and experiencing the twists and turns of life itself.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Courtney Stockstill

    After reading this book you want to try to be more like Ronald Reagan. It also, makes you believe that he was just a normal person like most all of us, and most of the things he did, we can each do as individuals. The book is very inspirational.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Thomas

    From the man who wrote the "Tear Down this Wall" speech Reagan is so famous for. This book gives insight into the man that is quite valuable to anyone who wants to know more about the Reagan Years. Very well written.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Cynthia

    I love this book, and would recommend it to every young person (18+), especially young men.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Todd

    The title originally turned me off, but this is one of the best books I have ever read...

  17. 4 out of 5

    Kasey

    What a wonderful book. This is one that belongs on the shelf of each and every "Ordinary American". Loved it.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jane Wathuta

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Interesting peak into a less familiar world and job...

  19. 4 out of 5

    Teegan

    Given to me as a gift. Haven't known a whole lot about Reagan and appreciated the personal insights from one of his speechwriters.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Lynn

    I have to admit I found this portrayal of Ronald Reagan inspiring and even brought a tear to my eye at its most poignant pages.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Allison

    I listened to this on audio, but who doesn't love a little Ronnie?

  22. 5 out of 5

    Tracie Davis

    Fantastic read!!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Renee

    Loved it. Quick read, unique view of Ronald Reagan through the eyes of a man who wrote many of his speeches.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

  25. 5 out of 5

    Stephen

  26. 5 out of 5

    Tony

  27. 5 out of 5

    Maralyne Ullerich

  28. 5 out of 5

    Eric

  29. 4 out of 5

    Levan Ramishvili

  30. 4 out of 5

    Allen

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.