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What Is the Women's Rights Movement?

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The story of Girl Power! Learn about the remarkable women who changed US history. From Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton to Gloria Steinem and Hillary Clinton, women throughout US history have fought for equality. In the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, women were demanding the right to vote. During the 1960s, equal rights and opportunities for women- The story of Girl Power! Learn about the remarkable women who changed US history. From Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton to Gloria Steinem and Hillary Clinton, women throughout US history have fought for equality. In the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, women were demanding the right to vote. During the 1960s, equal rights and opportunities for women--both at home and in the workplace--were pushed even further. And in the more recent past, Women's Marches have taken place across the world. Celebrate how far women have come with this inspiring read!


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The story of Girl Power! Learn about the remarkable women who changed US history. From Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton to Gloria Steinem and Hillary Clinton, women throughout US history have fought for equality. In the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, women were demanding the right to vote. During the 1960s, equal rights and opportunities for women- The story of Girl Power! Learn about the remarkable women who changed US history. From Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton to Gloria Steinem and Hillary Clinton, women throughout US history have fought for equality. In the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, women were demanding the right to vote. During the 1960s, equal rights and opportunities for women--both at home and in the workplace--were pushed even further. And in the more recent past, Women's Marches have taken place across the world. Celebrate how far women have come with this inspiring read!

30 review for What Is the Women's Rights Movement?

  1. 4 out of 5

    David

    5.0 I learned so much! It made me so proud of the efforts of some of these brave women leaders of the past and so thankful for their commitment. It made me want to start marching. This is one of my favorite of the series because it was filled with some fantastic statistics and loads of important female leaders. It also helped me quantify an issue I already knew and that is that women's rights, although improved, still needs to go further to correct a historical wrong that has exists around the wo 5.0 I learned so much! It made me so proud of the efforts of some of these brave women leaders of the past and so thankful for their commitment. It made me want to start marching. This is one of my favorite of the series because it was filled with some fantastic statistics and loads of important female leaders. It also helped me quantify an issue I already knew and that is that women's rights, although improved, still needs to go further to correct a historical wrong that has exists around the world and still exists in the United States today. The only negative is that I wish it had included the metoo movement, but that might have been a product of it being focused toward a young audience.

  2. 4 out of 5

    ConfusedKyra

    Even though these types of books are for younger audiences, I love them. I think that this book was very empowering. I enjoyed learning about the past and how we achieved civil rights. I think it will teach the younger generation how to respect people no matter their gender.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    So, I didn't plan on reading this all in one sitting. It's been on my radar since it showed up at the library, and I thought I'd scan it to see how it managed to cover such a long period of history. This book does an excellent job of covering the movement as it unfolded in the United States of America, starting at the founding of our country and finishing with the 2016 election response. There are a few gaps in this coverage I think are worth mentioning. First, even though the text mentions a co So, I didn't plan on reading this all in one sitting. It's been on my radar since it showed up at the library, and I thought I'd scan it to see how it managed to cover such a long period of history. This book does an excellent job of covering the movement as it unfolded in the United States of America, starting at the founding of our country and finishing with the 2016 election response. There are a few gaps in this coverage I think are worth mentioning. First, even though the text mentions a couple global feminist issues, like voting rights and representation, it only recognizes thinkers and leaders in the United States. Starting in the early 1800's and continuing today, U.S. feminist leaders have been greatly influenced by the ideas coming from other parts of the world. Without even a passing mention to this influence, students might wrongly conclude feminism started in the U.S. and spread to other places. Second, while recognizing the importance of women of color, this book acknowledges the fact of their marginalization without mentioning how the primacy of white middle and upper class issues have weakened the movement. Students might interpret this to mean women of color were left out because their issues are less important, not because someone decided their issues were less important. As an educator, the fact the text mentions the issue means it can be brought up and clarified in discussion, but it's still a gap that could lead to incorrect conclusions. This brings us to our third gap. The text completely overlooks LGBTQ contributions to the women's movement. Considering the age group in question, this is kind of a major omission. Students in late elementary school are at the very least familiar with those letters, and even a passing reference to how the two movements intersect is important.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Ping Jun

    For many years women weren’t seen as a separate person after they got married. Many of the married women stayed home cleaning the house, cooking, and sewing and much more of the house chores, while their husbands was at work. Then the women’s rights movement started in a little city in upstate New York. Elizabeth Cady Stanton wrote speeches for Susan B. Anthony to give because Elizabeth was a mother and a wife. Women also didn’t have the same job opportunities and equal pay as men did, even thou For many years women weren’t seen as a separate person after they got married. Many of the married women stayed home cleaning the house, cooking, and sewing and much more of the house chores, while their husbands was at work. Then the women’s rights movement started in a little city in upstate New York. Elizabeth Cady Stanton wrote speeches for Susan B. Anthony to give because Elizabeth was a mother and a wife. Women also didn’t have the same job opportunities and equal pay as men did, even though they hold the same job position or title. In 1920 women finally had the rights to vote after Alice Paul and some of the other protesters were put into jail for several days. Another strong opportunity came for another woman named Hillary Clinton, she made history. She was the first woman to be a nominee of a major political party.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Natalie

    I always love reading about badass women who changed history. I just love those ladies. I think about them often. We have a long way to go, as the book points out, especially in politics and business, but we've come a long way and it's thanks to these awesome women who never accepted defeat. We should all read their story. They did the hard work, the least we can do is appreciate them. This book is perfect for kids. It covers the basics in a simple way. It tells of the most famous women and what I always love reading about badass women who changed history. I just love those ladies. I think about them often. We have a long way to go, as the book points out, especially in politics and business, but we've come a long way and it's thanks to these awesome women who never accepted defeat. We should all read their story. They did the hard work, the least we can do is appreciate them. This book is perfect for kids. It covers the basics in a simple way. It tells of the most famous women and what they did. This is an excellent addition to the series.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Sophia

    What Is the Women's Rights Movement? by Deborah Hopkinson Published October 16, 2018 <3 The story of Girl Power! Learn about the remarkable women who changed US history. From Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton to Gloria Steinem and Hillary Clinton, women throughout US history have fought for equality. In the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, women were demanding the right to vote. During the 1960s, equal rights and opportunities for women—both at home and in the workplace—were pus What Is the Women's Rights Movement? by Deborah Hopkinson Published October 16, 2018 <3 The story of Girl Power! Learn about the remarkable women who changed US history. From Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton to Gloria Steinem and Hillary Clinton, women throughout US history have fought for equality. In the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, women were demanding the right to vote. During the 1960s, equal rights and opportunities for women—both at home and in the workplace—were pushed even further. And in the more recent past, Women's Marches have taken place across the world. Celebrate how far women have come with this inspiring read!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Tyna

    Well written, especially for a younger group. It included people of color and pointed out that many women’s rights organizations were not perfect. They had shortcomings and excluded certain people from their ranks. Happily, this book now also has to be updated because right away on page three it says, “No woman has ever been elected president or vice president of the United States...at least not yet.”

  8. 5 out of 5

    Yvonne

    Wonderful book of the movement and the brave and dedicated women who fought for equal rights for all. I liked that it covered the big names but also the lesser known names. It was also good that it went as far as current wins (2015 woman in Saudi Arabia voted for the first time). It's important to remember and to say their names. Lucy Stone Elizabeth Cady Stanton Susan B. Anthony Alice Paul Frederick Douglas Eleanor Roosevelt Ida B. Wells Lucretia Mott Sojourner Truth Wonderful book of the movement and the brave and dedicated women who fought for equal rights for all. I liked that it covered the big names but also the lesser known names. It was also good that it went as far as current wins (2015 woman in Saudi Arabia voted for the first time). It's important to remember and to say their names. Lucy Stone Elizabeth Cady Stanton Susan B. Anthony Alice Paul Frederick Douglas Eleanor Roosevelt Ida B. Wells Lucretia Mott Sojourner Truth

  9. 4 out of 5

    Kevin Wright

    I found this to be incredibly well-balanced in terms of breadth and depth. Has a clear throughline and lots of interesting fun facts along the way. As an adult who knew most of this stuff, I found it fascinating and well presented. It finds a way to appeal to kids without shying away from historical realities.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Hillary

    I have mixed feelings with this book -- I loved the topic and think it is so important; however, the reading was a bit dry. I read it aloud to my fourth graders -- and some kiddos (in particular my girls) were totally hooked while others were bored. I'm using this as a launching pad for passion projects that are focused on activism. I have mixed feelings with this book -- I loved the topic and think it is so important; however, the reading was a bit dry. I read it aloud to my fourth graders -- and some kiddos (in particular my girls) were totally hooked while others were bored. I'm using this as a launching pad for passion projects that are focused on activism.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Vani Ghanate

    It was great to learn that the history of women in the United States is similar to that of women in India in many ways, the difference being changes happened rapidly here and changes are gradual in India. Was a great read!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Carolyn

    I liked reading the book. I grew up in a different country than the US. It’s very educational for me to read these what is series. Although we really borrowed this book from the library for my 8 year old daughter. She is not quite there yet.

  13. 5 out of 5

    brooke

    A shorter read. I learned a lot from this book and feel more empowered. At times the book was confusing by going back and fourth with dates but overall a good read. I wish schools taught us this instead of me having to find a book on my own to learn.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Emma

    The fight still continues today but we are definitely in a better place than Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony were and for that I am thankful.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Valencia

    This book was very interesting.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Nathaniel

    I liked it

  17. 4 out of 5

    Denise Tan

    These are such great books and so informative.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jaclyn Preciado

    Really great overview of First Wave feminism, but too short on Second and Third Wave. Still, a good book that I’ll share with my kids because in general I like The Who is/What is series.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    Good introductory book on the issue for kids.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Charity Cole

    Another great who was book. Through research. Well written. Positive tone but doesn’t ignore reality.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Vickie

    Great summary of how we got to where we are....

  22. 4 out of 5

    Katherine Barr

    Helpful overview.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Amandallp

    Great book for elementary age children, I would say from 8 to 12 years old.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Majo

    +1

  25. 4 out of 5

    Amelia

    I learned that there were a lot of important women who helped get women rights. It was from Abigail Adams to Hillary Clinton. And still women don't have all of the same/equal rights as men. I learned that there were a lot of important women who helped get women rights. It was from Abigail Adams to Hillary Clinton. And still women don't have all of the same/equal rights as men.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Aliva

    The women's rights movement was a series of protests and conventions led by women to gain rights for women. Rights like voting, equal pay, or a woman for president. Susan B. Anthony, and Elizabeth Cady Stanton both held speeches about slavery and the right to vote. Because Elizabeth had seven kids, she wrote the speeches and Susan gave them. The women's rights movement was a series of protests and conventions led by women to gain rights for women. Rights like voting, equal pay, or a woman for president. Susan B. Anthony, and Elizabeth Cady Stanton both held speeches about slavery and the right to vote. Because Elizabeth had seven kids, she wrote the speeches and Susan gave them.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Karen Holt

    good overview. so wish we had studied topics like this in school instead of every war in western civilization and all the ancient stuff.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Sofie Sieling

    Only chauvinists would give this less than 5 stars despite the fact that it's for children primarily. I am proud of being female, and I too strive to see the shattering of the glass-ceiling for full equality. Only chauvinists would give this less than 5 stars despite the fact that it's for children primarily. I am proud of being female, and I too strive to see the shattering of the glass-ceiling for full equality.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Lily

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jeremy

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