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Gregor and the Curse of the Warmbloods

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The third installment of New York Times bestselling Underland Chronicles, in which Gregor must stop a plague from spreading through the Underland, will feature fresh new cover art, coming July 1st! Gregor's adventures continue in Book 3 of the New York Times bestselling series by author Suzanne Collins. With two prophecies fulfilled, Gregor is now focused on the Prophecy of The third installment of New York Times bestselling Underland Chronicles, in which Gregor must stop a plague from spreading through the Underland, will feature fresh new cover art, coming July 1st! Gregor's adventures continue in Book 3 of the New York Times bestselling series by author Suzanne Collins. With two prophecies fulfilled, Gregor is now focused on the Prophecy of Blood, which calls for Gregor and Boots to return to the Underland to help ward off a plague. But this time, his mother refuses to let him go . . . unless she is allowed to travel with them. When they arrive in the subterranean city, the plague is spreading -- and it claims one of Gregor's closest companions. Only then does Gregor start to understand how the illness plays with the fate of all warm-blooded creatures. But how can he help combat it?


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The third installment of New York Times bestselling Underland Chronicles, in which Gregor must stop a plague from spreading through the Underland, will feature fresh new cover art, coming July 1st! Gregor's adventures continue in Book 3 of the New York Times bestselling series by author Suzanne Collins. With two prophecies fulfilled, Gregor is now focused on the Prophecy of The third installment of New York Times bestselling Underland Chronicles, in which Gregor must stop a plague from spreading through the Underland, will feature fresh new cover art, coming July 1st! Gregor's adventures continue in Book 3 of the New York Times bestselling series by author Suzanne Collins. With two prophecies fulfilled, Gregor is now focused on the Prophecy of Blood, which calls for Gregor and Boots to return to the Underland to help ward off a plague. But this time, his mother refuses to let him go . . . unless she is allowed to travel with them. When they arrive in the subterranean city, the plague is spreading -- and it claims one of Gregor's closest companions. Only then does Gregor start to understand how the illness plays with the fate of all warm-blooded creatures. But how can he help combat it?

30 review for Gregor and the Curse of the Warmbloods

  1. 5 out of 5

    Ahmad Sharabiani

    Gregor and the Curse of the Warmbloods (Underland Chronicles, #3), Suzanne Collins Gregor and the Curse of the Warmbloods is an epic fantasy children's novel by Suzanne Collins. It is the third book in The Underland Chronicles, and was first published by Scholastic in 2005. The novel takes place a few months after the events of the preceding book, in the same subterranean world known as the Underland. In this installment, the young protagonist Gregor is once again recruited by the Underland's inh Gregor and the Curse of the Warmbloods (Underland Chronicles, #3), Suzanne Collins Gregor and the Curse of the Warmbloods is an epic fantasy children's novel by Suzanne Collins. It is the third book in The Underland Chronicles, and was first published by Scholastic in 2005. The novel takes place a few months after the events of the preceding book, in the same subterranean world known as the Underland. In this installment, the young protagonist Gregor is once again recruited by the Underland's inhabitants, this time to help cure a rapidly-spreading plague. تاریخ نخستین خوانش: روز شانزدهم ماه جولای سال 2014 میلادی عنوان: تاریخ اعماق زمین - کتاب سوم - گریگور و نفرین خونگرمها؛ نویسنده سوزان کالینز؛ مترجم عاطفه احمدی؛ تهران، ویدا، چاپ اول و دوم 1392؛ در 293ص؛ شابک 9786002910363؛ موضوع: داستانهای علمی تخیلی از نویسندگان انگلیسی - سده 20م داستان پسری یازده ساله، به نام «گریگور»، و خواهر دو ساله‌ ی ایشان، در سفری ماجراجویانه، در دنیایی فانتزی، زیر شهر نیویورک را باز میگوید؛ در کتاب «تاریخ اعماق زمین - جلد سوم - گریگور و نفرین خونگرم‌ها» نوبت پیشگویی خون فرارسیده؛ همان پیشگویی که «گریگور» او را از سفر پیشین خویش به دنیای عجیب و غریب زیرزمینی، همراه خود آورده بود؛ حالا او و «بوتز»، باید برای پیدا کردن درمان طاعونی که، جان موجودات خونگرم را، به خطر انداخته، به دنیای زیرزمینی بازگردند، اما مادرشان اجازه اینکار را به آن‌ها نمی‌دهد؛ تا اینکه گروهی از موش‌های صحرایی کوچک، برای تهدید کردن آن‌ها به خانه‌ شان حمله می‌کنند؛ مجموعه ی «تاریخ اعماق زمین» پنج کتاب است؛ عنوانها: کتاب نخست «سفر شگفت‌انگیز گریگور»؛ کتاب دوم «گریگور و پیش‌گویی بین»؛ کتاب سوم «گریگور و نفرین خونگرم‌ها»؛ کتاب چهارم «گریگور و نشانگان رمزی»؛ کتاب پنجم «گریگور و رمز سرپنجه»؛ ا. شربیانی

  2. 4 out of 5

    Alexa

    Might be my favorite book in the series so far. I love the characters. Gregor, Luxa, Boots, Temp, Ripred, and Ares are all great. And I can totally understand why Ripred is Suzanne Collins's favorite character. Since this series is for a younger audience, it's a bit more lighter and funnier than The Hunger Games. But really, it's not that much different. Sad things happen. There's war and hunger and death. And there's creepy stuff too. (Like with what happened to a bat in the previous book or the Might be my favorite book in the series so far. I love the characters. Gregor, Luxa, Boots, Temp, Ripred, and Ares are all great. And I can totally understand why Ripred is Suzanne Collins's favorite character. Since this series is for a younger audience, it's a bit more lighter and funnier than The Hunger Games. But really, it's not that much different. Sad things happen. There's war and hunger and death. And there's creepy stuff too. (Like with what happened to a bat in the previous book or the plague in this book. Really grossed me out.) There was a quote I wrote down from the first book that really made me think of THG, but I misplaced the paper I wrote it down on. Don't want to give spoilers, so I would say it was something like....life would never be the same but at least they had each other. Suzanne Collins is definitely one of my favorite authors. Can't wait to finish reading this series. :)

  3. 5 out of 5

    Steve Clark

    These books are supposed to be aimed at grades 4-6. I am therefore so very glad I have an 11-year old daughter, because otherwise I wouldn't have a good excuse to read this series--except that they're wildly entertaining and read as easily as putting down the tastiest junk food. As it is, we're having a blast tearing through them as part of our summer. She likes me to read first, because I'm a little better at holding back spoilers, but she's right behind me. The only problem: I'm now into book These books are supposed to be aimed at grades 4-6. I am therefore so very glad I have an 11-year old daughter, because otherwise I wouldn't have a good excuse to read this series--except that they're wildly entertaining and read as easily as putting down the tastiest junk food. As it is, we're having a blast tearing through them as part of our summer. She likes me to read first, because I'm a little better at holding back spoilers, but she's right behind me. The only problem: I'm now into book four and will finish it in a day or two, and there's only one more in the series. She'll likely be ready to take on the Hunger Games then, but I've already read them all. Thank you, Ms. Collins, thank you so very much. I myself feel eleven or twelve again; a wonderful way to pass the summer. If you want to have a fun read and don't HAVE an 11-year old offspring, borrow one from someone else and share it with them. And you'll never look at cockroaches, rats, and all sorts of other creepy-crawlies the same way again.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Darren Hagan

    Why is life so hard for poor Gregor?! :(

  5. 5 out of 5

    Mike

    A quick recap if you haven't been paying attention up until now: this is the third book in a five-book cycle, the first two books were good (but not great), it's by the author of The Hunger Games, and if you haven't read The Hunger Games, you're making remarkably terrible use of your time on this Earth. All caught up? Good. This book is probably my least favorite that Collins has written. That's not to say it's bad, but it's just not as entertaining as her other books have been, for a number of re A quick recap if you haven't been paying attention up until now: this is the third book in a five-book cycle, the first two books were good (but not great), it's by the author of The Hunger Games, and if you haven't read The Hunger Games, you're making remarkably terrible use of your time on this Earth. All caught up? Good. This book is probably my least favorite that Collins has written. That's not to say it's bad, but it's just not as entertaining as her other books have been, for a number of reasons. First off, I feel like Collins is beginning to resort to formula. THG got some accusations of this, and I didn't agree, but I'm starting to see what those people are talking about. In this series, every book so far has had the same basic plot: -> Gregor is taken to the Underland against his will. -> He receives a cryptic prophecy and has to go on a quest to save the Underland. -> Much bickering ensues. -> The prophecy turns out to have been saying something completely different than what they thought it had said. -> Gregor gets home fine, but half the secondary cast dies. It's getting just a bit repetitive. The plot here would've been fine in its own right, but because it's basically the same thing that Collins did in the first two books, it falls flat. This one in particular fell flat due to a pacing problem towards the beginning - I can tell that Collins wanted to flesh out Gregor's life in the Overland, but it's not nearly as interesting as the Underland, and it just feels like very slow rising action. Collins normally handles pace expertly, but this is very sub-par for her. Once we get to the plot, though, it's thematically interesting, and in that regard, this book is much better than the two that came before it. This is no Hunger Games thematically, but it's an honest attempt to expose kids to complex ideas, and for the most part, it works. There have always been themes of racism and nationalism in the series, but this is the first time that Collins really explores it, fleshing out exactly how the species see each other. It's typically more complex than just, "I hate everyone but me," and although the 'racism is bad' message is a little too constant, it's a little more groundbreaking than what you normally see in these fantastical explorations. It's also got some commentary on the nature of violence - Gregor has always accepted it as necessary until now (and he has no reason not to), but for the first time, we see Gregor questioning that. These themes foreshadow the themes that we got in The Hunger Games, and while the message here isn't quite as fleshed-out, it feels just as complex and rings just as true. The characters are also just as interesting as before. Ripred continues to be awesome (Yay!), and Gregor is as interesting of a protagonist as ever. I am beginning to have a little trouble keeping up with the side cast (it helps that half of them die in each book, so I only have to remember a few characters going in). Other than that, though, the characterization was solid. The writing, however, was the other area where this book fell a little flat for me. In the first two books of the series, Collins used a little of the slang that Gregor would use, all of it painful. There, though, it was tolerable, because it happened so occasionally. Here, it's a lot more constant, and it's just as painful as ever. I had to return the book to the library, so I can't offer examples, but I really wish Collins hadn't chosen to use any slang, especially considering the book is written in third person - it was just distracting and unnecessary. Overall, while I found this to be a weaker entry into the series, I still enjoyed it, and if you've enjoyed the series up until now, there's no reason not to read it. I've been told that the next book isn't very good, so... that sucks. But until then, you can enjoy this one.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Mari

    While I was considering what I would say about this review, I thought, "I'll give it four stars," and I thought of some very good reasons why I deducted that one star. But, shucks, who am I kidding? I don't exactly know where this love of middle grade fiction has come from, but I'm such a sucker for it. Yes, there are things that I can say weren't as great as previous entries into this series. It seems like we spent less time with the main characters in this one. The entire story zooms right by While I was considering what I would say about this review, I thought, "I'll give it four stars," and I thought of some very good reasons why I deducted that one star. But, shucks, who am I kidding? I don't exactly know where this love of middle grade fiction has come from, but I'm such a sucker for it. Yes, there are things that I can say weren't as great as previous entries into this series. It seems like we spent less time with the main characters in this one. The entire story zooms right by you from crippling plague to resolution, which is good for young readers, but makes you pause if you are an adult reading this series... And yes, you can call into question the very idea that all of these events in Regalia have a prophecy. You either buy into it or don't read the series. It isn't a fault of the plot, in my opinion; it's the premise. I just love these characters so much, especially Gregor and Boots. Whenever I spend a few hours reading about their adventures, I'm happy enough. I loved meeting Hamnet and Hazard and they both broke my heart, of course. There are a lot of many good questions that this book brings up, as always. My favorite of these moments is when Gregor briefly thinks on how things cannot be better if humans and rats keep teaching their young to fear each other. It's what makes such a simply written, middle grade book just the kind of thing an older reader can find entertainment it. Another great, short and easy read.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Chris

    There's a bit of a formula with the Gregor books. 1. Gregor has a dull home life and the beginning has to remind you of this. His family has real-life problems with money, food, and everything else. 2. For some stupid reason, Gregor finds himself in the Underland again along with his useless 2-year-old sister. 3. Some kind of issue goes down with the humans in the Underland. 4. Gregor, the chosen one, must go on a quest in order to resolve the issue. He battles random creatures and his sister must g There's a bit of a formula with the Gregor books. 1. Gregor has a dull home life and the beginning has to remind you of this. His family has real-life problems with money, food, and everything else. 2. For some stupid reason, Gregor finds himself in the Underland again along with his useless 2-year-old sister. 3. Some kind of issue goes down with the humans in the Underland. 4. Gregor, the chosen one, must go on a quest in order to resolve the issue. He battles random creatures and his sister must go along for some dopey reason as well. Book 3 does this, obviously, although compared to book 2, it appeared to take Gregor a bit longer to actually get on his quest. More time was spent on his dull home life, more arguing amongst the Underlanders took place in regards to the meaning of the prophesies, and oddly enough, the more controversial characters seemed to get less "screen time" this time around. The Gregor series keeps teasing at an eventual storyline where the humans are the bad guys with the rats having been misunderstood but even with some of the twists in this book, we're still not quite there yet. Book 3 felt rather formulaic and added the least to the chronicles so far, overall.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Becky

    This series was made to be used as a literary tool for helping kids understand war. I’m just convinced of that. They are amazing, I am so stressed for the characters while reading these, apprehensive of what I see looming in their futures, and that’s a pretty big reaction for books created for twelve year olds. Specifically this book deals with reparations, racism, the effects of long-endured wars and hatreds in shaping culture, the dangers of pacificism, and biological warfare. The environment i This series was made to be used as a literary tool for helping kids understand war. I’m just convinced of that. They are amazing, I am so stressed for the characters while reading these, apprehensive of what I see looming in their futures, and that’s a pretty big reaction for books created for twelve year olds. Specifically this book deals with reparations, racism, the effects of long-endured wars and hatreds in shaping culture, the dangers of pacificism, and biological warfare. The environment is very much like Alice in Wonderland in the sense that there is a secret and semi-magic world that you can literally fall into, after that, however, the comparison ends. These books or urban and much darker, in fact, some of the darkest and most shockingly heart wrenching books I’ve read for the age group. Its violent, but always so hopeful that there are better ways to solve our problems, it would be such a great tool to introducing the World War II to middle schoolers. Collins continues to write actual literature for her young readers, and I very much feel that these books will stand the test of time.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Mira

    I really enjoyed this 3rd installment of the Underland Chronicles. It might even be my favorite in the series so far. I liked the plot and the major twist in the end and I loved how fast-paced the whole thing was. This managed to break my heart a bit which didn't surprise me at all because, you know, Suzanne Collins. Weirdly(?) Ripread has became my favorite character. I see him as Haymitch Abernathy of this series. :D I really enjoyed this 3rd installment of the Underland Chronicles. It might even be my favorite in the series so far. I liked the plot and the major twist in the end and I loved how fast-paced the whole thing was. This managed to break my heart a bit which didn't surprise me at all because, you know, Suzanne Collins. Weirdly(?) Ripread has became my favorite character. I see him as Haymitch Abernathy of this series. :D

  10. 5 out of 5

    Sakina (aforestofbooks)

    THIS. BOOK. IS. INCREDIBLE. Definitely my favourite so far of the series. I'm still in shock and I can't believe what happened (even though I sort of knew it was heading there). The ending...I am so sad. And mad. But mostly sad. And worried. Honestly, poor Gregor never gets break. He has to struggle just to get by in the real world, and then he's constantly being dragged into the Underland. Everyone is suffering. His poor dad, his sister Lizzie, and his mom. Only Boots is happy and oblivious and s THIS. BOOK. IS. INCREDIBLE. Definitely my favourite so far of the series. I'm still in shock and I can't believe what happened (even though I sort of knew it was heading there). The ending...I am so sad. And mad. But mostly sad. And worried. Honestly, poor Gregor never gets break. He has to struggle just to get by in the real world, and then he's constantly being dragged into the Underland. Everyone is suffering. His poor dad, his sister Lizzie, and his mom. Only Boots is happy and oblivious and saying hi to cockroaches in her spare time and playing with poisonous frogs. She's so precious and innocent and I want to protect her. She is also three years old now and like my child has grown so much, she's not a baby anymore 😭 This book. This series. I just...I'm so glad I decided to pick the first book up on a whim.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Mie

    Cute series and perfekt to listen to on a sunny day sitting outside a cafe drinking coffee - and that is just what I did :-)

  12. 5 out of 5

    Erica

    Have these Underlanders ever, since Mr. Sandwich took them below, had a non-prophecy day? It seems to me that Gregor is always hopping down the air shaft to go fufill some underground prophecy and no one bats an eye (or eyes a bat, ha ha ha), like prophecy-fulfilling is a daily thing, something everyone knows about and engages in from birth. Like breathing and eating. It makes me think that Sandwich and others scheduled every day from now until the series ends with prophecy-doing. Getting Gregor Have these Underlanders ever, since Mr. Sandwich took them below, had a non-prophecy day? It seems to me that Gregor is always hopping down the air shaft to go fufill some underground prophecy and no one bats an eye (or eyes a bat, ha ha ha), like prophecy-fulfilling is a daily thing, something everyone knows about and engages in from birth. Like breathing and eating. It makes me think that Sandwich and others scheduled every day from now until the series ends with prophecy-doing. Getting Gregor to the Underland is beginning to feel contrived, the prophecies even more so. I think it would have been easier to just lump all the cryptic rhymes together to form one quest that could take place over the course of the many books. These are beginning to take on the Harry Potter rhythm I often find so frustrating: Start at home where things are rough (in Gregor's case, it's near-poverty and a missing parent, rather than living in a closet in the home of gluttonous relatives), go to a magical place, do something great, then return home. Next book, start again. I will keep listening to the series; I like the idea. I like the cockroaches. And, amazingly enough, Gregor is growing and maturing. There's enough there that makes me want to continue the story, but the individual books are becoming harder and harder for me to follow without a lot of heavy sighing.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jenben8426

    I really am enjoying this series. In fact I think they are getting a bit better each time. I think Collins was really learning how to grip her readers with the first one, and now is picking up speed. Her ability to grip your emotions is becoming stronger. Great storyline this time. Gregor must return to the Underland this time to fulfull the prophecy of blood. A plague has gripped the Underland nations and it will be up to Gregor to help find the cure. Only this time it hits far more close to ho I really am enjoying this series. In fact I think they are getting a bit better each time. I think Collins was really learning how to grip her readers with the first one, and now is picking up speed. Her ability to grip your emotions is becoming stronger. Great storyline this time. Gregor must return to the Underland this time to fulfull the prophecy of blood. A plague has gripped the Underland nations and it will be up to Gregor to help find the cure. Only this time it hits far more close to home, when his mother, who journeyed with Boots and Gregor to the Underland for the first time has come down with the dreaded plague. Another daring adventure. Old and new friends. Lessons in learning to work with the so-called enemy and finding out what love can truly accomplish. The only complaint that I really have is the talking ability of Gregor's two year old sister Boots. Maybe she has just barely two and that might explain things. I think she is a little too young sounding, or maybe my little girl just has a large and articulate vocabulary for her age. :)

  14. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Stewart

    I've been on the point of swearing off series because they just seem to drag me on and on without giving me the fulfillment of a journey from exposition through a climax to a conclusion that I expect from a book. It was such a relief to be in the hands of an author who knows what they are doing and can create satisfying story that stands on its own two feet even when it is part of a series. I'm getting very attached to Gregor and Co. Each character is distinct and memorable--they feel real becau I've been on the point of swearing off series because they just seem to drag me on and on without giving me the fulfillment of a journey from exposition through a climax to a conclusion that I expect from a book. It was such a relief to be in the hands of an author who knows what they are doing and can create satisfying story that stands on its own two feet even when it is part of a series. I'm getting very attached to Gregor and Co. Each character is distinct and memorable--they feel real because they have deep internal conflicts within themselves that cause surprising reactions to different situations--but are still consistent with their characterization. I am amazed with every book in this series how much I can love a two-year old character. Boots is one of my favorites! The author doesn't shy away from some pretty heavy situations and ethical questions, but she also uses enough humor, wonder and adventure to keep it enjoyable. I did like this better than the second one, but I've enjoyed all of them.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jen

    This is a great installment in this series. I don't think it could stand alone very well, but the moving of the overall plot is fantastic, as is the story within this volume. I loved the new characters, and was sad to lose a few of them, but happy that we will get to continue to read about a few more. The action is consistent and engaging, the characters are relatable and well-developed. Warning, though: my skin was crawling through a large portion of this book. With all that Suzanne Collins has This is a great installment in this series. I don't think it could stand alone very well, but the moving of the overall plot is fantastic, as is the story within this volume. I loved the new characters, and was sad to lose a few of them, but happy that we will get to continue to read about a few more. The action is consistent and engaging, the characters are relatable and well-developed. Warning, though: my skin was crawling through a large portion of this book. With all that Suzanne Collins has thrown at us, I don't know that anything has been quite this...icky. I'm talking rats. Not the large, personified Underland variety, but the New York City skittery icky kind. Swarming. *shudder* Followed by plague-infested fleas. Also swarming. And killer soldier giant red ants. Again, swarming. *shudder* I'm going to need to shower again, just for reliving it all in this review. All that aside, this is a really good book, and the development of the characters and the story is natural and authentic, and very worth reading.

  16. 4 out of 5

    love, jamie

    This is by far my favorite in the series, you really get to see how HIGH the stakes are. The action builds up there is so so much character development. I love literally everyone (which can only be said about maybe four other series). The writing is fantastic and very easy for little eleven year old me to read for the first time, and now 5 years later to still be able to love this for what it is. Luxa is a badass.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Lorrie

    This is the least favorite in the series for my daughter, but she still liked it. She thought it was a little confusing, and didn't like the end (view spoiler)[the fact that they went on the quest when they didn't really have to (hide spoiler)] , and she wished there would've been more explanation where the plague and the cure were concerned. This is the least favorite in the series for my daughter, but she still liked it. She thought it was a little confusing, and didn't like the end (view spoiler)[the fact that they went on the quest when they didn't really have to (hide spoiler)] , and she wished there would've been more explanation where the plague and the cure were concerned.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Martine

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Hold on one second ... I just need to ... catch my breath *whiew* that book was stressful!! The whole journey through the jungle had me stressed and worried. When they ran out of water, I think I must’ve drunk enough water for the whole lot. Gregor has really grown on me. I love his sense of justice, and his helpful nature. It was so sweet how Gregor groomed Lapblood!!! I also liked that he managed to get Luxa and Hamnet to talk before it was too late, and that he was determined to apologize for Hold on one second ... I just need to ... catch my breath *whiew* that book was stressful!! The whole journey through the jungle had me stressed and worried. When they ran out of water, I think I must’ve drunk enough water for the whole lot. Gregor has really grown on me. I love his sense of justice, and his helpful nature. It was so sweet how Gregor groomed Lapblood!!! I also liked that he managed to get Luxa and Hamnet to talk before it was too late, and that he was determined to apologize for what he said to the rats about them not caring about their pups. I was slightly irritated with Luxa when she showed up in the jungle, but then she kinda slayed at the end of the book, so I guess Luxa and I are on good terms. I felt very sorry for Lapblood, losing almost all her loved ones. I’m sad about Frill (who I also wiiiiiiiiiiiish had been talkiiiiiiiiiing more) and Hamnet ... poor Hazard. Also, I just have an undying love for Temp, and I really want a Temp in my life🥺 I kept hoping that Ares would be okay, and I’m relieved that he was recovering at the end of the book. Oh my god, that whole quest just to learn that the cure was in Regalia all along?? I was also kinda stressed throughout this book by the fact that Gregor’s mom couldn’t go home and provide for their family. Good to know that Gregor is sharing his secret with Mrs. Cormaci. I JUST KNOW IN MY HEART THAT MRS. CORMACI WILL DO EVERYTHING IN HER POWER TO HELP GREGOR AND HIS FAMILY, OK? I enjoyed reading this book, and I’m looking forward to see what happens next!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Claudia {SparrowHawk}

    Gregor and the Curse of the Warmbloods is comprised of what most refer to the second book syndrome in that the story served more as a stable foot for the developing plotline. Even so, the story sufficed, the characters were unique in their own right, and the overall tone was adventurous to some extent. What this book offered more of, in retrospect, was a fiery explosion of tension and shock-inducing moments where I found myself asking what the contents of the book are actually trying Gregor and the Curse of the Warmbloods is comprised of what most refer to the second book syndrome in that the story served more as a stable foot for the developing plotline. Even so, the story sufficed, the characters were unique in their own right, and the overall tone was adventurous to some extent. What this book offered more of, in retrospect, was a fiery explosion of tension and shock-inducing moments where I found myself asking what the contents of the book are actually trying to convey. ___________________________________ WHAT I LIKED + What Gregor and the Curse of the Warmbloods lacks in entertainment, it makes up for in moral value. I came to reason with this conclusion as I mulled all the niggling details of the plot over and over again until I finally grasped where this series is headed. Let me take a few moments to elaborate: So there I was, aimlessly turning the pages all while trying to harness my nuanced emotions of boredom which eventually turned to emotional frustrations. (view spoiler)[Oh boy, mom is headed to the Underland! Wonder how this is going to play out. What’s up with Luxa’s erratic behavior? Who is this Hamnet character and how is he relevant to the storyline? Where are Gregor’s rager powers? Is Suzanne Collins really going to kill off Ares? Where’s Twitchtip? Who cares about your lousy parents! Can we move along? Please? (hide spoiler)] . So on and so on. It wasn’t until I arrived at the last quarter of the book ―where Ripred began to shed light on the political entanglements of the Underland― that it finally dawned on me. All the petty bickering, the tedious quarrels, the acts of discrimination, the conflicts, and frustrations against social injustice and the political structure, all these underlying elements were Suzanne Collins’ medium to address the reader directly about the very people in power today and their abuse of that power! And that, my friends, is where the plot thickened. You begin to see the corruption gradually unfold as Suzanne Collins begins to peel back the plotline’s layers and you’re left sitting in complete shock thinking, “This is some disturbing stuff.” All that to say, the plotline progressed in the end and it seems to be developing into something completely unexpected. + While I was frustrated with Suzanne Collins’ decision to introduce (yet again) a new cast of characters, I have to admit that the character development in this book was well-executed; primarily Luxa who despite my quibbles, (view spoiler)[I couldn’t grasp Luxa’s offense towards Gregor. I couldn’t comprehend why she didn’t return to Regalia. What is she running away from? Her calling? Her fears? This wasn’t made clear. (hide spoiler)] showed great potential and left a strong impression in the end. The other characters showed great growth too and you can only imagine my great pleasure when I learned that Ripred was going to join Gregor on his quest :D + As awful as this may sound, much of the book’s redeeming factor comes from Ripred’s half-heartedness towards Gregor, the humans, and the Underland. He kept things interesting and his snide remarks echoed a lot of what I was feeling. To boot, I appreciated his candor as he elucidated the political entanglements of the Underland. Yet at the same time, he had me doubting and perusing his motives (he’s such a mesmerizing character); still and all, behind that façade of indifference I know that there is a beating heart, and this is what makes him so utterly inscrutable WHAT I DIDN'T LIKE - Gregor and the Curse of the Warmbloods did not surpass its predecessor, Gregor and the Prophecy of Bane . The story line started off slow, a new array of characters (that served more as plot devices) were introduced, and the book reeked with growing tension and endless bickering. Granted, the companions raised reasonable concerns and their altercations were oddly entertaining, but it's already draining enough having to mediate my children's monotonous squabble, so to have to stumble upon petty indifferences in a book I’m expecting to grant lull from the mundane things in life was aggravating. This was my main issue with the story, to say the least. - Gregor and the Prophecy of Bane's gripping cliffhanger left me begging for more; thus, you can imagine my frustration as I jumped into book three and was immediately introduced to a new cast of characters and received subtle implications of previous events. Still, while initially wary and irked with the new cast of characters, taking their personalities and brief backstories into consideration, I’d say they were likable and helped to get a better grip on the plot line. AFTERTHOUGHTS The last quarter of the book easily rates 5/5 for me. It didn’t shy away from depicting the horrors of war and corruption and certainly raised a few interesting points, but ultimately, I thought the story was too simplistic and that the idea of a third book in the series was unnecessary. Despite these quibbles and the wearisome and unsettling moments, my appreciation for the story did prevail, so that’s a plus right? Blog || Facebook || Twitter || Instagram || Google+ || Bloglovin'

  20. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    Last read of 2019, and my continuing Underland Chronicles buddy read with Stephanie! This series continues to be alright. I can't help but keep mentally comparing it to Animorphs, my absolute fave in terms of a middle-grade series handling children in war, and thus the Underland Chronicles just aren't as good -- but the further Collins gets into the series, the better the content becomes, slowly introducing additional complexities and shades of grey. The revelation/resolution in this one was my f Last read of 2019, and my continuing Underland Chronicles buddy read with Stephanie! This series continues to be alright. I can't help but keep mentally comparing it to Animorphs, my absolute fave in terms of a middle-grade series handling children in war, and thus the Underland Chronicles just aren't as good -- but the further Collins gets into the series, the better the content becomes, slowly introducing additional complexities and shades of grey. The revelation/resolution in this one was my favourite so far, I think: finally incorporating the idea that the good guys are not uniformly good, in addition to the message all along that enemies like the rats are not uniformly bad, either. It's a great ending. I think my main issue rn is that the books are very formulaic: Gregor and his family are struggling along in the overland, there's a brewing prophecy that requires his involvement, he goes below, Boots is cute to underland creatures, and the final interpretation of the prophecy is not what they expected. There's some slight changes of the status quo, but not a lot. My greatest desire for the next/fourth book is for Lizzie to join them below (she's like the only family member who hasn't yet!), and for Gregor to actually stay in the Underland between the 4th and 5th books, to shake up the formula. Considering how things have been slowly escalating in each book, though, I'm intrigued to see what'll happen in the last two.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Anne Maddox

    This book was so similar to circumstances today it was eerie. The contagion, being scanned before entering, the threat of spreading illness. Excuse me while I go hunt for the cradle..... Another great Gregor tale!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Toria

    Not quite a four star read but the series is starting to grow on me. It's reads very young as expected from a middle grade but it's entertaining nevertheless Not quite a four star read but the series is starting to grow on me. It's reads very young as expected from a middle grade but it's entertaining nevertheless

  23. 4 out of 5

    Leah

    Hauntingly familiar to today’s pandemic.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Hunger Games Bookclub (HGBC)

    For any Hunger Games fan, the earlier Suzanne Collins series is a worthwhile read. While it doesn't have the depth of THG, and is written for a younger age group (11-12 year olds), it carries many of the same themes as THG: the conflict between different groups, poverty vs wealth, violence and war. In fact, I would consider this series to be more violent and have more death, but the majority of it happens between animal species such as bats, rats, and spiders, and then humans. Various warfare is For any Hunger Games fan, the earlier Suzanne Collins series is a worthwhile read. While it doesn't have the depth of THG, and is written for a younger age group (11-12 year olds), it carries many of the same themes as THG: the conflict between different groups, poverty vs wealth, violence and war. In fact, I would consider this series to be more violent and have more death, but the majority of it happens between animal species such as bats, rats, and spiders, and then humans. Various warfare is discussed through different books in the series: biological warfare, genocide, stealing land, starving another people group, etc. Though animals, some of these characters are quite memorable, including the unforgettable Ripred - an uber intelligent and deadly rat. There is another similarity to THG in that the main character is not a violent person by choice, but is forced into circumstances in order to defend his younger sister, Boots... and later the rest of his family. Gregor is a very different hero than Katniss - he is more in touch with his feelings and is not shut down emotionally until the end - but he is responsible for his family in ways that children "should not be", forced out of childhood by the world surrounding him.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Amber

    It has been a while since Gregor and Boots have been in the underland. When he is summoned by the rats to overtake a new quest to find the cure of the curse of the warmbloods which came from when they returned from their last quest that has infected his bonded bat companion, Gregor and Boots with his mother return only to endanger his mother with the disease. Will Gregor be able to save his mother and the others from this deadly virus? Read on and Find out for yourself. I enjoyed this installment It has been a while since Gregor and Boots have been in the underland. When he is summoned by the rats to overtake a new quest to find the cure of the curse of the warmbloods which came from when they returned from their last quest that has infected his bonded bat companion, Gregor and Boots with his mother return only to endanger his mother with the disease. Will Gregor be able to save his mother and the others from this deadly virus? Read on and Find out for yourself. I enjoyed this installment of the Gregor series. It was pretty good and had tons of action and adventure in it. I look forward to finishing this series in the future. If you would like to check this series out, look for these books at your local library and wherever books are sold.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Kristy Orr

    Enjoyed! A bit slow at the beginning but picked up and got quite interesting. Still surprised by the amount of violence. I wish Solovet had been executed with Neveeve. I do not care for Solovet. And Hazard is without his daddy :C Still waiting for Twitchtip to return and thankful that they found Luxa & Aurora. I am shocked that they left Gregor's mom in the underland and is he gonna tell his neighbor?! Can't wait to find out. Enjoyed! A bit slow at the beginning but picked up and got quite interesting. Still surprised by the amount of violence. I wish Solovet had been executed with Neveeve. I do not care for Solovet. And Hazard is without his daddy :C Still waiting for Twitchtip to return and thankful that they found Luxa & Aurora. I am shocked that they left Gregor's mom in the underland and is he gonna tell his neighbor?! Can't wait to find out.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Adi

    These books are an amazing middle grades, so unique and beautifully written. I love how these books show up how messed the society is. You can transform any of the societies in the underworld to those in our owns, how the "pure" people cannot accept those with different skin color or a different religion. feels like a "must-read" for country leaders. telling them how they should be, act and think. Suzanne Collins sounds like an amazing person These books are an amazing middle grades, so unique and beautifully written. I love how these books show up how messed the society is. You can transform any of the societies in the underworld to those in our owns, how the "pure" people cannot accept those with different skin color or a different religion. feels like a "must-read" for country leaders. telling them how they should be, act and think. Suzanne Collins sounds like an amazing person

  28. 5 out of 5

    Catherine

    Back in the Underland to fulfill yet another prophecy, but this time with even more at stake. I can't tell you more than that without ruining any surprises. There are some great new characters, in addition to the old favorites. Gregor continues to grow as a character and Boots is great as always. By this third book, I've really started to like Ripred, the crazy renegade rat. Back in the Underland to fulfill yet another prophecy, but this time with even more at stake. I can't tell you more than that without ruining any surprises. There are some great new characters, in addition to the old favorites. Gregor continues to grow as a character and Boots is great as always. By this third book, I've really started to like Ripred, the crazy renegade rat.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Sonja Arlow

    Firstly I know that I have never been the target audience for this series but did enjoy the first two books, using them as fluff reads, between books with more substance. However this will be the last book I will read of the series. The writing is too formulated and after the first book nothing new was ever really brought into the story.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Lori

    I am really loving this series.

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