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Leveraged Learning: How the Disruption of Education Helps Lifelong Learners, and Experts with Something to Teach

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The roadmap to success as a knowledge worker, professional, and expert has changed. Gone are the days when education was something that only happened at the start of your career. The name of today's game, both personally and professionally, is to be constantly learning: just enough, just in time, and never stopping. But where can knowledge workers, professionals, and lifelo The roadmap to success as a knowledge worker, professional, and expert has changed. Gone are the days when education was something that only happened at the start of your career. The name of today's game, both personally and professionally, is to be constantly learning: just enough, just in time, and never stopping. But where can knowledge workers, professionals, and lifelong learners go to find the training and education they need to stay current and thrive? It's no secret that universities and colleges are struggling to keep pace and stay current. Often out of touch, exorbitantly overpriced, and slowed by unwieldy infrastructures, bureaucracies and tenure, these institutions are fundamentally designed to deliver a mode of education that still serves an important purpose, but leaves many of our individual and collective needs for learning and growth sorely unmet. This crisis is an opportunity for the experts and professionals who possess the knowledge and skills that are so sorely needed by so many. The solution is to package their expertise into leveraged learning programs that create transformation for the lifelong learners who need them, and profit for the experts who create them. Danny Iny, a successful educator entrepreneur, has been leading the charge on this growing movement. And in Leveraged Learning he lays out the guidebook for navigating and thriving in this new world – both as a lifelong learner, and as an expert with something to teach. As a lifelong learner, you'll gain the skills and acquire the tools that you need to grow and thrive: * How education has changed, and the implications for knowledge workers and professionals. * Why the education system is failing you, and what alternatives to consider. * How to hack your patterns of behavior to support and accelerate your learning. * The two layers of learning that you must stack together to achieve mastery. * Which mental habits are critical to achieving ongoing, sustained success. * How to tell which online courses are worth taking, and which to avoid. * Why most online courses have single-digit completion rates, and how to transcend the statistics. And as an expert with something to teach, you'll learn how to package your expertise for others' benefit, and your profit: * What it really takes to develop a lucrative revenue stream from your expertise. * The piloting methodology that has worked for thousands of successful online course creators. * How to design a curriculum that engages students and leads to mastery. * What to test, measure, and iterate as your course grows and evolves. * Research-based techniques to help every student perform at the 98th percentile of success. * Methodologies for peer-based feedback that cost-effectively support student learning. * How to engineer student success with accountability, gamification, and artificial intelligence. All this and much, much more is yours for the taking. Leveraged Learning is your indispensable guide to staying current, growing, and thriving in the modern world. From the book: "The current dysfunction of education is so egregious because it hurts so many of us. Most obviously, it hurts the graduates who find themselves with a degree that has practically no market value, forced to make ends meet as Starbucks baristas or Uber drivers. It hurts the bearers of a combined $1.4 trillion of student debt. For those keeping score, that’s more than credit card debt... and unlike credit card debt, you can’t even declare bankruptcy and free yourself of the potentially lifelong consequences of a bad decision you might have made as a teenager. It hurts the employers who are starved for talent. Education hasn’t prepared job seekers with the skills to fill more than six million open jobs in the United States alone, even as almost seven million Americans are unemployed and looking for work. It hurts the learners who seek alternatives. They waste enormous amounts of time and money bouncing between a host of imperfect options like MOOC programs with completion rates that max out at 15 percent, overpriced continuing education programs offered by universities, and courses provided by private instructors of varying quality. And it hurts educators and learning professionals. They labor heroically to brighten their students’ futures, but often that their best efforts can’t overcome the inertia and challenge of the systems in which they operate. We all hurt from the broken nature of modern education, that no longer prepares us for success. And we all need a solution that is more than just a band-aid. Thankfully, such a solution exists. That’s what this book is about."


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The roadmap to success as a knowledge worker, professional, and expert has changed. Gone are the days when education was something that only happened at the start of your career. The name of today's game, both personally and professionally, is to be constantly learning: just enough, just in time, and never stopping. But where can knowledge workers, professionals, and lifelo The roadmap to success as a knowledge worker, professional, and expert has changed. Gone are the days when education was something that only happened at the start of your career. The name of today's game, both personally and professionally, is to be constantly learning: just enough, just in time, and never stopping. But where can knowledge workers, professionals, and lifelong learners go to find the training and education they need to stay current and thrive? It's no secret that universities and colleges are struggling to keep pace and stay current. Often out of touch, exorbitantly overpriced, and slowed by unwieldy infrastructures, bureaucracies and tenure, these institutions are fundamentally designed to deliver a mode of education that still serves an important purpose, but leaves many of our individual and collective needs for learning and growth sorely unmet. This crisis is an opportunity for the experts and professionals who possess the knowledge and skills that are so sorely needed by so many. The solution is to package their expertise into leveraged learning programs that create transformation for the lifelong learners who need them, and profit for the experts who create them. Danny Iny, a successful educator entrepreneur, has been leading the charge on this growing movement. And in Leveraged Learning he lays out the guidebook for navigating and thriving in this new world – both as a lifelong learner, and as an expert with something to teach. As a lifelong learner, you'll gain the skills and acquire the tools that you need to grow and thrive: * How education has changed, and the implications for knowledge workers and professionals. * Why the education system is failing you, and what alternatives to consider. * How to hack your patterns of behavior to support and accelerate your learning. * The two layers of learning that you must stack together to achieve mastery. * Which mental habits are critical to achieving ongoing, sustained success. * How to tell which online courses are worth taking, and which to avoid. * Why most online courses have single-digit completion rates, and how to transcend the statistics. And as an expert with something to teach, you'll learn how to package your expertise for others' benefit, and your profit: * What it really takes to develop a lucrative revenue stream from your expertise. * The piloting methodology that has worked for thousands of successful online course creators. * How to design a curriculum that engages students and leads to mastery. * What to test, measure, and iterate as your course grows and evolves. * Research-based techniques to help every student perform at the 98th percentile of success. * Methodologies for peer-based feedback that cost-effectively support student learning. * How to engineer student success with accountability, gamification, and artificial intelligence. All this and much, much more is yours for the taking. Leveraged Learning is your indispensable guide to staying current, growing, and thriving in the modern world. From the book: "The current dysfunction of education is so egregious because it hurts so many of us. Most obviously, it hurts the graduates who find themselves with a degree that has practically no market value, forced to make ends meet as Starbucks baristas or Uber drivers. It hurts the bearers of a combined $1.4 trillion of student debt. For those keeping score, that’s more than credit card debt... and unlike credit card debt, you can’t even declare bankruptcy and free yourself of the potentially lifelong consequences of a bad decision you might have made as a teenager. It hurts the employers who are starved for talent. Education hasn’t prepared job seekers with the skills to fill more than six million open jobs in the United States alone, even as almost seven million Americans are unemployed and looking for work. It hurts the learners who seek alternatives. They waste enormous amounts of time and money bouncing between a host of imperfect options like MOOC programs with completion rates that max out at 15 percent, overpriced continuing education programs offered by universities, and courses provided by private instructors of varying quality. And it hurts educators and learning professionals. They labor heroically to brighten their students’ futures, but often that their best efforts can’t overcome the inertia and challenge of the systems in which they operate. We all hurt from the broken nature of modern education, that no longer prepares us for success. And we all need a solution that is more than just a band-aid. Thankfully, such a solution exists. That’s what this book is about."

30 review for Leveraged Learning: How the Disruption of Education Helps Lifelong Learners, and Experts with Something to Teach

  1. 4 out of 5

    Shira

    While I enjoyed some of his quotes, I found that really nothing in the book was new. We are using most of the suggestions already via Khan academy, and also lesson planning that I'm finally allowed to do now that I've got my own classroom and academic freedom to use the teaching methods that have been being taught more recently. scaffolding is among them and context as well as various techniques for teaching critical thinking. I will admit to finally understanding thanks to his explanations, why While I enjoyed some of his quotes, I found that really nothing in the book was new. We are using most of the suggestions already via Khan academy, and also lesson planning that I'm finally allowed to do now that I've got my own classroom and academic freedom to use the teaching methods that have been being taught more recently. scaffolding is among them and context as well as various techniques for teaching critical thinking. I will admit to finally understanding thanks to his explanations, why all those smiley faces and happy rewards on Khan academy are so important to my students. but from the writing style I can now see much more clearly why many people criticized the younger generation.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Matt Hutson

    The book is 195 pages long, half of it talks about what the education Revolution is, including some, what I thought to be, irrelevant factors such as self-driving cars, whereas the second half was much more practical and precisely talking about how experts can create their own online education system. In my opinion, if the book had focused more on the 'how' rather than the what, it would have been more valuable to me. Nonetheless, I still gave the book a solid four stars out of five. There is val The book is 195 pages long, half of it talks about what the education Revolution is, including some, what I thought to be, irrelevant factors such as self-driving cars, whereas the second half was much more practical and precisely talking about how experts can create their own online education system. In my opinion, if the book had focused more on the 'how' rather than the what, it would have been more valuable to me. Nonetheless, I still gave the book a solid four stars out of five. There is value to be had, if you're business owner, educator, or both, you can apply the tips from this book to create your own online system. Its strengths are based on helping you to create the objective you want your clients to succeed. Danny, the author, goes into depth about how to create an objective which will work. It goes deeply into the psychology of an online course client, and how you can leverage that psychology. Another great thing is all the acronyms which make the concepts easy to understand, the diagrams are really helpful as well. There are some references to many other books which I was able to add to my Goodreads list as well as my Amazon Wish List. These are the big positives about this book. Danny suggests books I had not even heard of before. If you are looking for a way to create your own online business based on what you are an expert at, I highly recommend reading through this book if you have not already built your online business. As our technology improves, and more of the world starts shifting to online education, this field will increase in credibility and opportunity to make a huge difference. If you are able to get your online business legitimized sooner than later, and maybe some partnerships with existing businesses or schools in your field of expertise as well, you will be ahead of the game.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Carma Spence

    Since the Industrial Revolution, society has been changing more and more rapidly. Every industry and aspect of life has gone through at least one paradigm shift due to the disruption of a sometimes seemingly small change. According to author Danny Iny, it is now education’s turn. In this book, he explains a variety of concepts, from "The Story of Progress" to "Why Modern Education Is Ineffective, Overpriced, and Ubiquitous." He talks about how education evolved over time and his predictions for w Since the Industrial Revolution, society has been changing more and more rapidly. Every industry and aspect of life has gone through at least one paradigm shift due to the disruption of a sometimes seemingly small change. According to author Danny Iny, it is now education’s turn. In this book, he explains a variety of concepts, from "The Story of Progress" to "Why Modern Education Is Ineffective, Overpriced, and Ubiquitous." He talks about how education evolved over time and his predictions for where it will go in the future. I believe this book discusses an idea whose time has come. While I was reading it, the University where I work started talking about many of the same topics I was reading. I will admit that I have a crush on this book. As I read it my intellect was stimulated, my imagination was engaged and I spoke to anyone who would listen to me about the concepts I was learning. Iny’s writing style is both conversational and authoritative. I not only felt like I was at a table discussing the topic with him, but also that he really knew what he was talking about. He had done his research and didn’t completely rely on his personal experience. At the end of each chapter, the author provides a series of questions to help the reader fully integrate with the information provided in that chapter. These would make great conversation starters if a book club read this book. I also liked the list of further reading provided at the end of each chapter. I definitely added some of his suggestions to my Amazon Wish List! If there is a fault in this book, it is that throughout the book, I felt there was an underlying promise that the book would provide advice to course creators on how to use the ideas it shared and practically apply them in the real world. In fact, one chapter is called "Designing Great Courses." However, I don’t think that promise was fully realized. I finished the book still wondering how I could help my students gain more value from courses I create. I think this book is a must-read for anyone involved in or interested in education. How we learn is changing with the advance in technology. What we need to learn is changing with the evolution of business. Although this book may not answer all the questions it raises, I feel that it is import to raise them so that we can start exploring possible solutions together. I received a copy of this book in return for an honest review.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jaime K

    This book WINS AT LIFE. I’m listening to the audiobook and I’m 8 minutes in when I think “I must own this.” By the end, I fully realize why there is a FREE online version that’s being updated--because in about 5 years, this book will be outdated. With a great variety of supplemental and researched sources, Iny presents a fairly detailed book, despite the fact that he simply brushes the surface. He does a great job of describing that what WORKS is what is readily accessible to people and things tha This book WINS AT LIFE. I’m listening to the audiobook and I’m 8 minutes in when I think “I must own this.” By the end, I fully realize why there is a FREE online version that’s being updated--because in about 5 years, this book will be outdated. With a great variety of supplemental and researched sources, Iny presents a fairly detailed book, despite the fact that he simply brushes the surface. He does a great job of describing that what WORKS is what is readily accessible to people and things that the majority succeed from. While the chapters are broad and pragmatic, Iny’s words are steeped in research and he constantly reminds us that it’s “as of this writing,” which I haven’t seen recently in some other non-fiction books I’ve read, so it’s refreshing. “There’s always some way to learn, but you can only learn if you commit to your own education.” – (Foreword by Mitch Joel) So how do *I* seek out education and knowledge? We don’t marvel at certain things anymore...until they break. And it’s time to bring back the wonder. The formula that used to work (High school → college → get a job!) is no longer accurate. It’s stale and so very outdated. The availability of different learning programs and materials needs to be considered. Granted, there is a plethora of them, so what is good? What works? “Fundamentally, we no longer have a place that we can reliably go to become valuable to (and valued by) the rest of society. That hurts so many of us, in so many different ways.” – (Introduction) Letters after a person’s name no longer signal as impressive a status like they used to. There is a misalignment with the needs of graduates, especially because most jobs require higher-order cognitive skills over an impressive course load (even for jobs that DO require a degree/certificate). This particularly relates to skills and qualities that a computer can’t do. We need to learn--and teach--how to be legitimate lifelong learners. Learn to learn. And I love how Iny goes through both good and bad reasons to go to college. He explains the reality why colleges aren’t likely to change. We NEED to provide choices that don’t exclude anyone. We need a robot-proof education. I LOVE his words on creativity We must teach fortitude!! And Iny provides some great strategies and examples for both learners and teachers about how to succeed, even in failure. Digital: NOT solely computer anymore but phones, and we HAVE to take that into consideration.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jim

    This was easy to understand and should be helpful, I think, to many teachers. The author asserts that the four year college degree is not as helpful as it once was. Prospective employers have learned they can't assume a current college graduate has the skills needed for the job. This author suggests instead, two years of basic education, a year of something very specific to a profession/vocation, and then continuing education to stay current. This seems as if it might have some advantages! Emplo This was easy to understand and should be helpful, I think, to many teachers. The author asserts that the four year college degree is not as helpful as it once was. Prospective employers have learned they can't assume a current college graduate has the skills needed for the job. This author suggests instead, two years of basic education, a year of something very specific to a profession/vocation, and then continuing education to stay current. This seems as if it might have some advantages! Employers can provide up to date recommendations for skills needed, and can then count on the student possessing appropriate training. The student can count on landing a job that needs the skills he or she possesses. The cost for this training would be lower than most students are currently paying, and they won't start work with a lot of student loans. This training is also my chief complaint. What the student receives looks more like training than education. It turns out good workers, but not leaders. It teaches how to do, rather than how to think. Reconsider including the Trivium and Liberal Arts education.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Miguel Panão

    Disruptive I found Danny’s book inspiring with interesting references, pointing to possible directions for the future of education. As a Professor in technology, there is a culture in students who find difficulties in accepting the empowerment we’re giving to them. It takes a minute to update an App, but a lifetime to change a culture. There more to do than meets the eye, and online education might be a solution, but also the primary source of distraction.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Damon Lembi

    Excellent book! A Great book anyone who is interested in the future of education and instructional design. I also think the self assessment questions at the end of each chapter are a clever idea!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    This book presents some sobering statistics about our educational systems. More students are graduating with more debt, yet unable to fill the most crucial positions that require creativity and innovation. Great for those who want to create new ways of teaching and learning.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Becky L Long

    Great book with great resources. Added lots of books to my must read list. Also introduced me to several learning platforms out there i had not yet identified. If you're frustrated at the current education system, this book is a great place to start LEARNING how you can make a difference.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Scott Schluter

    Covered many of the ways I feel myself about education.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Adrienne

    Quick read I picked up at the ATD ICE conference. Most concepts were not novel.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Marcus Harden

    Insightful and useful as an educator! This book was less aha and more amen/confirmation of how I’ve wanted to guide my students and staff as a K-12 educator. Thank you!

  13. 5 out of 5

    David

    A must read for any educator whether with the title or charged with the responsibility to help others learn.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Mariana

    Excellent reflexions and further reading recommendations at the end of each chapter.

  15. 4 out of 5

    C.M. Subasic

    In Leveraged Learning, Danny Iny argues that universities are dead. That the future of learning is training produced by experts, or any educational facility that focuses on specific, skill-specific learning such as colleges. Mr. Iny covers some interesting ground and brings in some creative connections. I agree with him in many ways that universities need a huge overhaul. They are overpriced, with a small number of lucky ducks (tenured faculty) winning the prize, while sessional instructors are t In Leveraged Learning, Danny Iny argues that universities are dead. That the future of learning is training produced by experts, or any educational facility that focuses on specific, skill-specific learning such as colleges. Mr. Iny covers some interesting ground and brings in some creative connections. I agree with him in many ways that universities need a huge overhaul. They are overpriced, with a small number of lucky ducks (tenured faculty) winning the prize, while sessional instructors are treated like McDonald's cashiers. Administrations are bloated and overly bureaucratic. Students lose the most on this. As much as this book has a few interesting points, as much as he tries to show what a "creative thinker" he is, there is a strained quality to the entire project. Here are my quibbles: For students, a university education isn't just* about the knowledge you can stuff into your brain and the marketable skills you can learn along the way. It's about the social, meeting people, living on your own, broadening your world. About becoming an adult, or re-discovering great ideas as an adult. It is an experiential process, not a checkbox. He points out that, with the advent of technology and online classes and MOOCs (massively open online classes, free for anyone to take through MIT and some other institutions) apparently have a drop-out rate of 87%. Adult continuing education also has a high drop-out rate. Mr. Iny suggests that it a problem of the learner for not having "fortitude" to make it through the class. But that fortitude can be taught. But he doesn't seem to consider that maybe the teacher isn't very good. Or maybe on taking a [painting class, writing class, coding class] the learner decides they don't really want to go there because it's more work than they thought it would be and isn't the right path for them. Or maybe, they drop out because sitting in front of a computer reading pages and watching dry videos with no coaching, no social interaction, and tough content is only for those who are supernaturally motivated or have nothing better to do. For cognitive objectives at application and above, learners need more than facts stuffed in their heads. Meeting learning objectives that involve higher order thinking skills requires considering those ideas from multiple perspectives, in multiple formats. It involves discussion, writing about a topic, seeing videos about it. What keeps you motivated is being on a journey with others you develop relationships with (whether it's online or face-to-face). Teaching is an art. Learners in all types of programs no matter the technology, need support, encouragement, inspiration, coaching. As far as experts being great educational leaders? Well... only if they are humble enough and multi-talented enough to create engaging learning experiences. Why humble? Most experts forget what they didn't know before they knew it. They forget the challenges they went through to get where they are. The steps involved. The struggles. So they are stumped when learners aren't getting it. To do so in writing makes it that much harder (because so few have developed their writing enough to know how to communicate really really clearly). Why multi-talented? The typical way an expert creates a class is they dump knowledge, as if the learners are sponges soaking up information. The classes don't inspire, get learners thinking, or challenge them to try. They need to recognize this need to create an educational experience that gets the juices going. The result of the world Danny is suggesting is currently all around us. If you google "online coaching" you'll find the result of experts teaching. Because for the next week you'll receive ads in all of your social media that go something like this: "FREE ONLINE WEBINARS THAT WILL GET YOU A SIX FIGURE INCOME IN SIX WEEKS!". In other words, lots of hype, hope and people looking to cash in (on you). I know that Danny means well. This book tries really hard to predict education's next steps. But the solution offered don't really connect the dots. I would have preferred if Danny had spent his pages looking more closely at what he knows: developing online businesses and business relationships. Education is something we've all experienced and thus, all have an opinion about. Danny has a big stake in education because his company teaches experts how to develop their own online classes. This book claims to show a path to education's "new way." It sheds a few minor interesting lights, but does not meet its ambitions.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Vinayachandran Sadasivan

  17. 4 out of 5

    Manuel (Manny) Vallarino

  18. 5 out of 5

    Vladimir Lugo

  19. 4 out of 5

    Bruce Hunter

  20. 4 out of 5

    Katie Cannon

  21. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Forster

  22. 4 out of 5

    Amelia

  23. 5 out of 5

    Brett Rachel

  24. 5 out of 5

    Becky

  25. 4 out of 5

    Bradley

  26. 4 out of 5

    Fred

  27. 4 out of 5

    Adrian Bannera

  28. 5 out of 5

    Ron Rogers

  29. 5 out of 5

    Joseph Lion

  30. 5 out of 5

    oliver connolly

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