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Shortly after his conversion in 1929, C. S. Lewis wrote to a friend, When all is said (and truly said) about the divisions of Christendom, there remains, by God's mercy, an enormous common ground. From that time on, Lewis thought that the best service he could do for his unbelieving neighbors was to explain and defend the belief that has been common to nearly all Christian Shortly after his conversion in 1929, C. S. Lewis wrote to a friend, When all is said (and truly said) about the divisions of Christendom, there remains, by God's mercy, an enormous common ground. From that time on, Lewis thought that the best service he could do for his unbelieving neighbors was to explain and defend the belief that has been common to nearly all Christians at all times -- that enormous common ground which he usually referred to as mere Christianity.Lewis's defense of Christianity was colorfully varied -- the subjects he covered ranged widely, including Christianity and literature, Christianity and culture, ethics, futility, church music, modern theology and biblical criticism, the Psalms, and petitionary prayer.Presented in chronological order, some of the fourteen papers included in this collection were written specifically for periodicals, while others, published here for the first time, were read to societies in and around Oxford and Cambridge. Common to them all, however, are the uniquely effective style of C. S. Lewis and the basic presuppositions of his theology -- his mere Christianity."


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Shortly after his conversion in 1929, C. S. Lewis wrote to a friend, When all is said (and truly said) about the divisions of Christendom, there remains, by God's mercy, an enormous common ground. From that time on, Lewis thought that the best service he could do for his unbelieving neighbors was to explain and defend the belief that has been common to nearly all Christian Shortly after his conversion in 1929, C. S. Lewis wrote to a friend, When all is said (and truly said) about the divisions of Christendom, there remains, by God's mercy, an enormous common ground. From that time on, Lewis thought that the best service he could do for his unbelieving neighbors was to explain and defend the belief that has been common to nearly all Christians at all times -- that enormous common ground which he usually referred to as mere Christianity.Lewis's defense of Christianity was colorfully varied -- the subjects he covered ranged widely, including Christianity and literature, Christianity and culture, ethics, futility, church music, modern theology and biblical criticism, the Psalms, and petitionary prayer.Presented in chronological order, some of the fourteen papers included in this collection were written specifically for periodicals, while others, published here for the first time, were read to societies in and around Oxford and Cambridge. Common to them all, however, are the uniquely effective style of C. S. Lewis and the basic presuppositions of his theology -- his mere Christianity."

30 review for Christian Reflections

  1. 5 out of 5

    Dean

    On this rainy day sitting in the living room at my vacation lodge located in a beautiful and idyllic little village directly by the sea in Germany, finally I've completed to read this great essays collection by C. S. Lewis.... One of the advantages, I've discovered is that on rainy days you have the perfect excuse to read so much as you like... Friends, a really good collection indeed!!! Refreshing in his originality and like a spring morning full with births twitters and flowers full of aromatic o On this rainy day sitting in the living room at my vacation lodge located in a beautiful and idyllic little village directly by the sea in Germany, finally I've completed to read this great essays collection by C. S. Lewis.... One of the advantages, I've discovered is that on rainy days you have the perfect excuse to read so much as you like... Friends, a really good collection indeed!!! Refreshing in his originality and like a spring morning full with births twitters and flowers full of aromatic odour.... C. S. Lewis is unarguably a great writer with the gift to kidnaped your thoughts to different layers of reality, and to open the truth in ways never before expected.... In his essay of the Psalms, he takes you by the hand and expounds beautifully some of the questions you may have had about it.... Then, "The seeing eye" spontaneously beam you into the space, the galaxy!!! And of course he invites you as a Christian writer to consider in " Petitionary prayer: A problem without an answer" and also in "Modern theology and biblical criticism " Christians themes. C. S. Lewis " Christian reflections" guides you all the way to a dialogue, deep involved in the spirit of faith ... "The poison of subjectivism" is one of my favourites in this collection. On the other hand definitely this essay collection would I also recommend not for Christians alone!!! Because he has "Religion: Reality or substitute?" and "The funeral of a great myth" this aims to everybody who is open and searching for the truth... I've enjoyed to the uttermost this collection, it has empowered, refresh, new motivated and has given me anew a clear blue sky above my head and mind!!! So, yes!!!! Please, please, please, do yourselves a favour and invest your time and read this book!!! I won't leave you without a word to say about the paperback edition. A very good and handsome elaborated paperback edition.... Top, and qualitative valuable, with this edition it is a pleasure to dive deep in Lewis exquisite and wonderful thoughts!!! I'll give 5 stars, and would give even more if I could.... Folks, thanks so much for reading my review!!! To you all: Have fun, and be happy.... Dean:)

  2. 4 out of 5

    Douglas Wilson

    Great. Also read in October of 1983. Also read in March of 1980. Finished yet again in January of 2017.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Orange

    The magnificent collection of works by C. S. Lewis. First of all, I would like to highlight his essay "The Funeral of a Great Myth". Unfortunately, it is little known. This essay MUST be studied in schools and universities!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Curby Graham

    Amazing how well his material stands up even today.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Phil

    I came across this little volume in my church library. I had not seen it before so I borrowed it. It was first published in 1967 (Lewis died in 1963) and contains essays and talks that range from the late 30's to the early 60's. There is no unifying theme and I found the quality of the chapters to vary quite a bit, but unsurprisingly there are some real gems in here that are more than worth the effort. There are 14 chapters, but the ones that stood out to me the most were: 2. Christianity and Cult I came across this little volume in my church library. I had not seen it before so I borrowed it. It was first published in 1967 (Lewis died in 1963) and contains essays and talks that range from the late 30's to the early 60's. There is no unifying theme and I found the quality of the chapters to vary quite a bit, but unsurprisingly there are some real gems in here that are more than worth the effort. There are 14 chapters, but the ones that stood out to me the most were: 2. Christianity and Culture 3. Religion: Reality or Substitute? 6. The Poison of Subjectivism 7. The Funeral of a Great Myth 9. Historicism 13. Fern-seed and Elephants Christianity and Culture is part of some debate Lewis was having with other believers. There is one portion of the chapter that was a revelation for me. Forgive the long quote, but here it is: It was noticed above that the values assumed in literature were seldom those of Christianity. Some of the principal values actually implicit in European literature were described as (a) honour, (b) sexual love, (c) material prosperity, (d) pantheistic contemplation of nature, (e) Sehnsucht awakened by the past, the remote, or the (imagined) supernatural, (f) liberation of impulses. These were called "sub-Christian." This is a term of disapproval if we are comparing them with Christian values: but if we take" sub-Christian" to mean "immediately sub-Christian" (i.e., the highest level of merely natural value lying immediately below the lowest level of spiritual value) it may be a term of relative approval. Some of the six values I have enumerated may be sub-Christian in this (relatively) good sense. For (c) and (f) I can make no defence; whenever they are accepted by the reader with anything more than a " willing suspension of disbelief" they must make him worse. But the other four are all two-edged. I may symbolize what I think of them all by the aphorism " Any road out of Jerusalem must also be a road into Jerusalem." Thus: (a) To the perfected Christian the ideal of honour is simply a temptation. His courage has a better root, and, being learned in Gethsemane, may have no honour about it. But to the man coming up from below, the ideal of knighthood may prove a schoolmaster to the ideal of martyrdom. Galahad is the son of Launcelot. (b) The road described by Dante and Patmore is a dangerous one. But mere animalism, however disguised as "honesty," "frankness," or the like, is not dangerous, but fatal. And not all are qualified to be, even in sentiment, eunuchs for the Kingdom's sake. For some souls romantic love also has proved a schoolmaster. (d) There is an easy transition from Theism to Pantheism; but there is also a blessed transition in the other direction. For some souls I believe, for my own I remember, Wordsworthian contemplation can be the first and lowest form of recognition that there is something outside ourselves which demands reverence. To return to Pantheistic errors about the nature of this something would, for a Christian, be very bad. But once again, for "the man coming up from below" the Wordsworthian experience is an advance. Even if he goes no further he has escaped the worst arrogance of materialism: if he goes on he will be converted. (e) The dangers of romantic Sehnsucht are very great. Eroticism and even occultism lie in wait for it. On this subject I can only give my own experience for what it is worth. When we are first converted I suppose we think mostly of our recent sins; but as we go on, more and more of the terrible past comes under review. In this process I have not (or not yet) reached a point at which I can honestly repent of my early experience of romantic Sehnsucht. That they were occasions to much that I do repent, is clear; but I still cannot help thinking that this was my abuse of them, and that the experiences themselves contained, from the very first, a wholly good element. Without them my conversion would have been more difficult. I have dwelt chiefly on certain kinds of literature, not because I think them the only elements in culture that have this value as schoolmasters, but because I know them best; and on literature rather than art and knowledge for the same reason. My general case may be stated in Ricardian terms-that culture is a storehouse of the best (sub-Christian) values. These values are in themselves of the soul, not the spirit. But God created the soul. Its values may be expected, therefore, to contain some reflection or antepast of the spiritual values. They will save no man. They resemble the regenerate life only as affection resembles charity, or honour resembles virtue, or the moon the sun. But though "like is not the same," it is better than unlike. Imitation may pass into initiation. For some it is a good beginning. For others it is not; culture is not everyone's road into Jerusalem, and for some it is a road out. There is another way in which it may predispose to conversion. The difficulty of converting an uneducated man nowadays lies in his complacency. Popularized science, the conventions or "unconventions" of his immediate circle, party programmes, etc., enclose him in a tiny windowless universe which he mistakes for the only possible universe. There are no distant horizons, no mysteries. He thinks everything has been settled. A cultured person, on the other hand, is almost compelled to be aware that reality is very odd and that the ultimate truth, whatever it may be, must have the characteristics of strangeness-must be something that would seem remote and fantastic to the uncultured. Thus some obstacles to faith have been removed already. On these grounds I conclude that culture has a distinct part to play in bringing certain souls to Christ. Not all souls - there is a shorter, and safer, way which has always been followed by thousands of simple affectional natures who begin, where we hope to end, with devotion to the person of Christ. That is just brilliant. The other chapter I'll comment on is the one called Fern-seed and Elephants, where he is apparently speaking to a class of Anglican priests in seminary. He spends the whole time dismantling the entire apparatus of higher criticism on which was based all of liberal Christianity. Having just read Machen's Christianity and Liberalism, it was interesting to see the contrasts and similarities. Ultimately, I think they are complimentary arguments. Machen is far more suited for those already leery of and opposed to liberalism. He will clarify and arm the believer for combat. Lewis' chapter is addressed to those already in that world and so is a bit more winsome, but I think he sees the issue almost as clearly as Machen does. Consider these quotes: "What you [the liberal] offer him [the ordinary Christian] he will not recognize as Christianity. If he holds to what he calls Christianity he will leave a Church in which it is no longer taught and look for one where it is. If he agrees with your version he will no longer call himself a Christian and no longer come to church. In his crude, coarse way, he would respect you much more if you did the same." Speaking of Bultmann (a very influential liberal German theologian): "Through what strange process has this learned German gone in order to make himself blind to what all men except him see?" "These men ask me to believe they can read between the lines of the old texts; the evidence is their obvious inability to read (in any sense worth discussing) the lines themselves. They claim to see fern-seed and can’t see an elephant ten yards way in broad daylight." "The idea that any man [Christ] or writer should be opaque [misunderstood] to those who lived in the same culture, spoke the same language, shared the same habitual imagery and unconscious assumptions, and yet be transparent to those [modern liberal theologians] who have none of these advantages, is in my opinion preposterous. There is an a priori improbability in it which almost no argument and no evidence could counterbalance" "The canon ‘If miraculous, then unhistorical’ is one they [modern liberal theologians] bring to their study of the texts, not one they have learned from it. If one is speaking of authority, the united authority of all the biblical critics in the world counts here for nothing. On this they speak simply as men; men obviously influenced by, and perhaps insufficiently critical of, the spirit of the age they grew up in." "For agnosticism is, in a sense, what I am preaching. I do not wish to reduce the sceptical elements in your minds. I am only suggesting that it need not be reserved exclusively for the New Testament and the Creeds. Try doubting something else. Such scepticism might, I think, begin at the very beginning with the thought which underlies the whole demythology of our time." And then lastly, if not prophetically, this closing paragraph: "Such are the reactions of one bleating layman to Modern Theology. It is right that you should hear them. You will not perhaps hear them very often again. Your parishioners will not often speak to you quite frankly. Once the layman was anxious to hide the fact that he believed so much less than the vicar; now he tends to hide the fact that he believes so much more. Missionary to the priests of one’s own church is an embarrassing role; though I have a horrid feeling that if such mission work is not soon undertaken the future history of the Church of England is likely to be short."

  6. 4 out of 5

    Philip

    Though by his own admission, Lewis is no theologian, his essays and speeches on the Christian views of various topics will be valuable to any Christian reader. Is this work as cohesive as "Mere Christianity" or as witty as "Screwtape"? Certainly not. This work does two things: (1) It broadens our understanding of Lewis' thought. (2) It provides us with deep probing thoughts on the matters addressed. In this work, Lewis deals with a Christian approach to literature and aesthetics, an apologetic fo Though by his own admission, Lewis is no theologian, his essays and speeches on the Christian views of various topics will be valuable to any Christian reader. Is this work as cohesive as "Mere Christianity" or as witty as "Screwtape"? Certainly not. This work does two things: (1) It broadens our understanding of Lewis' thought. (2) It provides us with deep probing thoughts on the matters addressed. In this work, Lewis deals with a Christian approach to literature and aesthetics, an apologetic for the spiritual nature of Christian worship, a discussion of the topic of ethics and whether a "Christian" ethic should be taught to the world, an apologetic response to those who claim that the purpose of nature is merely futile, an attack on post-modern subjectivity, an attack on the theory of evolution and a suggestion on how others should do the same, a discussion on Church Music, a debate on how Christians should view history, an analysis of some imprecatory Psalms, a discussion of the connection between emotions and thought in language, a difficult question on how Christians should pray (left unresolved), a blistering attack on higher criticism, and an apologetic reply to the Russian cosmonaut who stated that he had been in space and did not see God.

  7. 4 out of 5

    John Martindale

    Oh how good it was to read Lewis again! Christian Reflections is a collection of the following essays and speeches: "Christianity and Literature" "Christianity and Culture" "Religion: Reality or Substitute" "On Ethics" "De Futilitate" "The Poison of Subjectivism" "The Funeral of a Great Myth" "On Church Music" "Historicism" "The Psalms" "The Language of Religion" "Petitionary Prayer: A Problem Without an Answer" "Modern Theology and Biblical Criticism" "The Seeing Eye" When I am in the mood, i hop Oh how good it was to read Lewis again! Christian Reflections is a collection of the following essays and speeches: "Christianity and Literature" "Christianity and Culture" "Religion: Reality or Substitute" "On Ethics" "De Futilitate" "The Poison of Subjectivism" "The Funeral of a Great Myth" "On Church Music" "Historicism" "The Psalms" "The Language of Religion" "Petitionary Prayer: A Problem Without an Answer" "Modern Theology and Biblical Criticism" "The Seeing Eye" When I am in the mood, i hope to come back and write a little summery of each chapter. I loved everyone

  8. 4 out of 5

    Steve

    Some really helpful pieces here, with one or two weaker pieces. Even where Lewis is weak on the doctrine of Scripture, there is still something to glean.

  9. 4 out of 5

    AnnaG

    CS Lewis always writes thought-provoking pieces and this collection of essays is no exceptions. While there were other points that I'll reflect on over time, there are two take-aways that immediately stuck out to me: 1) Evolution does not mean improvement. In a biological sense, evolution means change and more often than not even in that context that means degeneration and decay rather than progress.Yet, partly based on an idea of biological evolution as improvement, our whole society has created CS Lewis always writes thought-provoking pieces and this collection of essays is no exceptions. While there were other points that I'll reflect on over time, there are two take-aways that immediately stuck out to me: 1) Evolution does not mean improvement. In a biological sense, evolution means change and more often than not even in that context that means degeneration and decay rather than progress.Yet, partly based on an idea of biological evolution as improvement, our whole society has created a Myth that our achievements far exceed our ancestors because we are cleverer and better than they were. As Lewis points out - nothing is further than the truth. For example - superficially "modern art" may be technically more accomplished than prehistoric cave paintings, but it took a blinding flash of genius for that first cave dweller to realise that he could make two dimensional marks on the wall to represent the real world around him - an achievement that far exceeds any artist who appropriated his concept in the generations that followed. 2) Faith is a virtue - it is the act of continuing to believe something you think is true until presented with evidence to suggest it isn't. It's holding onto your opinions continuously and stead-fastly and not allowing peer pressure to push you into giving up on something you believe without a valid argument.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Rob

    A good collection of Lewis' essays. A few of the essays were very good. Specifically I found 'De Futilitate' and 'The Poison of Subjectivism' to be more than worth some of the less exciting 2 and 3 star essays. A worthy read, but maybe not the first works of Lewis to pick up.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Sean Southard

    As always, Lewis is great. I suggest should be read closely before or after reading The Abolition of Man and his Space Trilogy: Out of the Silent Planet / Perelandra / That Hideous Strength. My favorites from this collection were "Religion: Reality of Substitute," "On Ethics," "The Poison of Subjectivism," "Historicism," "The Language of Religion," and "The Seeing Eye." The last essay would make for a great discussion with the Space Trilogy, given the considerable length Lewis spends discussing As always, Lewis is great. I suggest should be read closely before or after reading The Abolition of Man and his Space Trilogy: Out of the Silent Planet / Perelandra / That Hideous Strength. My favorites from this collection were "Religion: Reality of Substitute," "On Ethics," "The Poison of Subjectivism," "Historicism," "The Language of Religion," and "The Seeing Eye." The last essay would make for a great discussion with the Space Trilogy, given the considerable length Lewis spends discussing his thoughts on the U.S.-Russian space race.

  12. 5 out of 5

    John

    Of the many collections of C.S. Lewis that are collected together after his death, this one is for me one of the more medicore. The latter essays are the better, and why that is is probably because of the topics they assess and their more accessible style. Lewis can be very complicated to read, with so many literary references to writers one usually don't have much of a relation to(both historical and contemporary) - so much of those kinds of debate are very probable misses for an audience of to Of the many collections of C.S. Lewis that are collected together after his death, this one is for me one of the more medicore. The latter essays are the better, and why that is is probably because of the topics they assess and their more accessible style. Lewis can be very complicated to read, with so many literary references to writers one usually don't have much of a relation to(both historical and contemporary) - so much of those kinds of debate are very probable misses for an audience of today. The subtitle of "Defending the Faith" is not really defendable by the content, although the title "Christian Reflections" is a good enough title for the collection. There are a few rememberable sections here that I will take with me, but most is stuff that did not stick.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Mwansa

    An enjoyable series of essays by Lewis. The man seems to always have page turners because of the wide range of his thinking and his clear communication. He addresses topics that may seem stale at first glance but then shows nuance that opens up the subject for further thought. He also shows a critical mind that ask questions concerning the things we believe and hold dear to that have us asking what we really believe and whether it can stand up to criticism. All round lewis remains one of my most An enjoyable series of essays by Lewis. The man seems to always have page turners because of the wide range of his thinking and his clear communication. He addresses topics that may seem stale at first glance but then shows nuance that opens up the subject for further thought. He also shows a critical mind that ask questions concerning the things we believe and hold dear to that have us asking what we really believe and whether it can stand up to criticism. All round lewis remains one of my most recommended authors because studying his work is like taking a crash course in critical thinking. A skill that is required more and more as we go through life.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jeff Rader

    I highly recommend the essays here. If you’ve made it through Mere Christianity, these essays will be very encouraging and give solid reasoning along with wit. I especially enjoyed one of the last essays on biblical criticism: it’s hard to accept historical criticism once your own work has been misunderstood by critics.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Rick

    Lewis is simply brilliant. Although these essays are a bit disconnected, and he frequently quotes contemporaries --who I am not familiar with -- and often throws in a phrase from [take your pick] Latin, Greek, or German, still, he shines.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Nderitu Pius

    A collection of various essays, some very dense for me to not go back to for a thorough read, others are amazingly straightforward. I love this book. It's nothing less of the Lewis standard for avid Lewis readers

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jenny

    *3.5 Stars*

  18. 5 out of 5

    Norman Styers

    A couple of good pieces, but some of it is too topical and is showing its age.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Danielle

    Here I was thinking that CS Lewis' essays couldn't get any better.... I was wrong. What. A. Masterpiece.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Myra Benedict

    Christian Reflections book is really helpful to grow in your knowledge and understanding in what u believe in.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Joel

    Exceptional read. Bite-size essays on many topics.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Shane Hill

    The parts I understood were most enjoyable.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Landree Rennpage

    CS Lewis is, hands down, one of my favorite authors, ever since I was a little girl. I could not have read these essays as a little girl, that's for sure, mostly because I wouldn't have had any idea what he was saying. I'm almost 30 now, and I know some of it went over my head, but certainly not all of it. These essays are generally replies to criticisms of Lewis' letters or his works, with a few speeches for like minded audiences. I particularly enjoyed his essay On Church Music, and found myse CS Lewis is, hands down, one of my favorite authors, ever since I was a little girl. I could not have read these essays as a little girl, that's for sure, mostly because I wouldn't have had any idea what he was saying. I'm almost 30 now, and I know some of it went over my head, but certainly not all of it. These essays are generally replies to criticisms of Lewis' letters or his works, with a few speeches for like minded audiences. I particularly enjoyed his essay On Church Music, and found myself agreeing with many of his major points, since I've been part of church choirs and singing groups, and they still function in much the same way even today. Most especially poignant, even today, were his essays on postmodernism and biblical criticism. I think quite a few scholars today, and many historians, could use a dose of the sage warnings he offers. FYI: Be prepared to skip over a phrase or two, especially if you haven't been boning up on your Greek and Latin. These works are very scholarly, but the average person can still get a great deal out of the essays, with a little time and effort. It is CS Lewis after all; what work of his isn't worth a little extra effort?

  24. 5 out of 5

    Marianna

    This is not Lewis at his best - perhaps too technical, too elaborated, sometimes one feels that he is going a long way round to say something he could have said (and did say, elsewhere) in a shorter and more elegant way. But for Lewis' fans it is still a very interesting reading, for it shows the fabric, the machinery of Lewis' thought, always precise and incisive, honest and humble. His personality, his temperament show very well in these papers. The themes are familiar - Christianity and Liter This is not Lewis at his best - perhaps too technical, too elaborated, sometimes one feels that he is going a long way round to say something he could have said (and did say, elsewhere) in a shorter and more elegant way. But for Lewis' fans it is still a very interesting reading, for it shows the fabric, the machinery of Lewis' thought, always precise and incisive, honest and humble. His personality, his temperament show very well in these papers. The themes are familiar - Christianity and Literature, petitionary prayer, psalms. In short, very much worth reading, but please do not start Lewis with this book - go to Mere Christianity, or The Screwtype Letters, or The Great Divorce. There you'll have Lewis as he is - a powerful and fascinating mind capable of conveying complex ideas in a simple and captivating prose.

  25. 5 out of 5

    John

    This was the first I had read through this collection of essays by Lewis. There are some real gems: "Christianity and Literature" is wonderfully insightful; "Christianity and Culture" is a solid essay, but dated and absent of much of the Christ and Culture discussions even of his day; "Religion: Reality or Substitute" is very quotable, quite substantial in parts; "Historicism" is great, almost a bit like Carl Trueman; "Moden Theology and Biblical Criticism" undermines much of modern theology as This was the first I had read through this collection of essays by Lewis. There are some real gems: "Christianity and Literature" is wonderfully insightful; "Christianity and Culture" is a solid essay, but dated and absent of much of the Christ and Culture discussions even of his day; "Religion: Reality or Substitute" is very quotable, quite substantial in parts; "Historicism" is great, almost a bit like Carl Trueman; "Moden Theology and Biblical Criticism" undermines much of modern theology as bunk; and "The Seeing Eye" is a classically usual Lewis essay. The best essay I thought is the one on petitionary prayer. Great collection and only some of the 15 essays included I found to be not very useful, and most all of them to be very useful.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Brian

    A brilliant man and a brilliant book. The first chapter on Christianity and Literature is brilliant and should be read by everyone attempting 'creativity'; there is very real Trinitarian theology behind it. His discussion of culture is really well balanced and should be model for us and I am always surprised when I read his opinions on Church music. Lewis, the layman champion, does not like mere joyful noise. Language of Religion is another brilliant work that I think inspired several things I lea A brilliant man and a brilliant book. The first chapter on Christianity and Literature is brilliant and should be read by everyone attempting 'creativity'; there is very real Trinitarian theology behind it. His discussion of culture is really well balanced and should be model for us and I am always surprised when I read his opinions on Church music. Lewis, the layman champion, does not like mere joyful noise. Language of Religion is another brilliant work that I think inspired several things I learned in rhetoric class. Some of the essays on The Psalms and Petitionary Prayer repeat much in larger Lewis books.

  27. 4 out of 5

    E Stanton

    I'm a huge fan of C.S. Lewis, so I enjoy everything I've ever read of his. This work was part of a one volume collection of three of his books (A Pilgrim's Regress, and God In The Dock) that I started some time ago. Although I enjoyed the book, I found the writings were very complex, or related to a specific issue or writing. For example several entries were a series of letters he wrote in response to criticisms of a column he submitted to a theological journal. For those reasons I found some of I'm a huge fan of C.S. Lewis, so I enjoy everything I've ever read of his. This work was part of a one volume collection of three of his books (A Pilgrim's Regress, and God In The Dock) that I started some time ago. Although I enjoyed the book, I found the writings were very complex, or related to a specific issue or writing. For example several entries were a series of letters he wrote in response to criticisms of a column he submitted to a theological journal. For those reasons I found some of the essays difficult to follow. I would recommend this to only the most avid fans of Lewis, and let the casual reader get some of the betterknown works.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Geoff

    typical C.S. Lewis, which is good. Makes you think; and his different background offers some great perspectives into Christianity and God. It is also interesting in that C.S. Lewis by no means wanted to be a Christian at all, and came to acknowledge God reluctantly, "kicking and screaming"; this is a counter argument to the claim that only people who want to believe in God, can believe in God. Here we have someone who by no means wanted to believe, yet, was drawn to God. He says he was hunted by typical C.S. Lewis, which is good. Makes you think; and his different background offers some great perspectives into Christianity and God. It is also interesting in that C.S. Lewis by no means wanted to be a Christian at all, and came to acknowledge God reluctantly, "kicking and screaming"; this is a counter argument to the claim that only people who want to believe in God, can believe in God. Here we have someone who by no means wanted to believe, yet, was drawn to God. He says he was hunted by God. So, God can certainly draw the atheist to himself, and atheist can follow their conscience as well to God.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Steve Coombs

    These essays give us some insight into Lewis' thoughts on issues not essential to "Mere Christianity", such as his opinions on styles of worship, the ordination of women, Christianity & Culture, and tendencies within academia. Some of the essays are only a few pages long and have all of the simplicity and wit you'd expect from Lewis, while others are lengthier and full of Greek and Latin quotations his Oxford peers would have understood, but not the average reader. Great for Lewis fans, and it s These essays give us some insight into Lewis' thoughts on issues not essential to "Mere Christianity", such as his opinions on styles of worship, the ordination of women, Christianity & Culture, and tendencies within academia. Some of the essays are only a few pages long and have all of the simplicity and wit you'd expect from Lewis, while others are lengthier and full of Greek and Latin quotations his Oxford peers would have understood, but not the average reader. Great for Lewis fans, and it shows how relevant his ideas still are 60 years later.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Tommy Grooms

    A good collection of essays representative of much of Lewis' thoughts on Christianity. Most are scholarly criticisms or responses and I found I had to Google a number of Greek and Latin phrases, but for the most part each essay consists of Lewis' usual readability, along with his usual geniality and thoroughness. Some of the contents he expresses elsewhere more succinctly or at greater length, but this is still well worth the time. I particularly enjoyed the essays on culture and literature.

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