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It's four in the morning and the lights are on. There's no way we're going to sleep, not after the film we just saw. Fear is one of the most primal human emotions, and one of the hardest to reason with and dispel. So why do we scare ourselves? It seems almost mad that we would frighten ourselves for fun, and yet there are thousands of books, films, and games designed to do It's four in the morning and the lights are on. There's no way we're going to sleep, not after the film we just saw. Fear is one of the most primal human emotions, and one of the hardest to reason with and dispel. So why do we scare ourselves? It seems almost mad that we would frighten ourselves for fun, and yet there are thousands of books, films, and games designed to do exactly that. As Darryl Jones shows in Sleeping with the Lights On, the horror genre is vast, ranging from vampires, ghosts, and werewolves to mad scientists, Satanists, and deranged serial killers. The cathartic release of scaring ourselves has made its appearance everywhere from Shakespearean tragedies to Internet memes. Exploring the key tropes of the genre, including its monsters, its psychological chills, and its love affair with the macabre, Jones explains why horror stories disturb us, and how society responds to literary and film representations of the gruesome and taboo. Should the enjoyment of horror be regarded with suspicion? What kind of a distinction should we make between the commonly reviled carnage of the contemporary horror genre and the culturally acceptable bloodbaths of ancient Greek tragedies? Analyzing how horror has been used throughout history to articulate the fears and taboos of the current generation, Jones considers the continuing evolution of the genre today. As horror is marketed to mainstream society in the form of romantic vampires and blockbuster hits, it maintains its shadowy presence on the edges of respectability, as banned films and violent Internet phenomena push us to question both our own preconceptions and the terrifying capacity of human nature.


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It's four in the morning and the lights are on. There's no way we're going to sleep, not after the film we just saw. Fear is one of the most primal human emotions, and one of the hardest to reason with and dispel. So why do we scare ourselves? It seems almost mad that we would frighten ourselves for fun, and yet there are thousands of books, films, and games designed to do It's four in the morning and the lights are on. There's no way we're going to sleep, not after the film we just saw. Fear is one of the most primal human emotions, and one of the hardest to reason with and dispel. So why do we scare ourselves? It seems almost mad that we would frighten ourselves for fun, and yet there are thousands of books, films, and games designed to do exactly that. As Darryl Jones shows in Sleeping with the Lights On, the horror genre is vast, ranging from vampires, ghosts, and werewolves to mad scientists, Satanists, and deranged serial killers. The cathartic release of scaring ourselves has made its appearance everywhere from Shakespearean tragedies to Internet memes. Exploring the key tropes of the genre, including its monsters, its psychological chills, and its love affair with the macabre, Jones explains why horror stories disturb us, and how society responds to literary and film representations of the gruesome and taboo. Should the enjoyment of horror be regarded with suspicion? What kind of a distinction should we make between the commonly reviled carnage of the contemporary horror genre and the culturally acceptable bloodbaths of ancient Greek tragedies? Analyzing how horror has been used throughout history to articulate the fears and taboos of the current generation, Jones considers the continuing evolution of the genre today. As horror is marketed to mainstream society in the form of romantic vampires and blockbuster hits, it maintains its shadowy presence on the edges of respectability, as banned films and violent Internet phenomena push us to question both our own preconceptions and the terrifying capacity of human nature.

30 review for Sleeping with the Lights on: The Unsettling Story of Horror

  1. 4 out of 5

    Mariana

    He estado en una racha de leer libros relacionados con el horror, pero más tirando hacia la no ficción. "Sleeping with the Lights on" entra precisamente en esa categoría: un libro de ensayos que reflexionan sobre el horror en sus diferentes vertientes. La introducción es GENIAL. Nunca me había topado con un autor que desglosara con tal claridad la diferencia entre horror y terror, pero también entre gótico, weird y "uncanny". Los capítulos se dividen entre varias de las manifestaciones en las qu He estado en una racha de leer libros relacionados con el horror, pero más tirando hacia la no ficción. "Sleeping with the Lights on" entra precisamente en esa categoría: un libro de ensayos que reflexionan sobre el horror en sus diferentes vertientes. La introducción es GENIAL. Nunca me había topado con un autor que desglosara con tal claridad la diferencia entre horror y terror, pero también entre gótico, weird y "uncanny". Los capítulos se dividen entre varias de las manifestaciones en las que consumimos el horror hoy en día, el horror y los monstruos, el horror del cuerpo (body horror), el horror y lo sobrenatural, el horror y la ciencia, etc. En cada uno de ellos hay reflexiones muy pertinentes sobre cómo ha ido evolucionando el género. Del mismo modo, el autor reflexiona sobre cómo nos encontramos en una era en la que se produce mucho "unhorror", es decir, historias que tienen los elementos formulaicos del horror pero que no consiguen provocarnos el más mínimo sobresalto. De acuerdo a Jones, esto no tiene tanto que ver con que se repitan las fórmulas sino con que el horror ha dejado de politizarse, de transgredir, romper paradigmas y -en los mejores casos- hacer que te cuestiones tu lugar en el universo. Ahora lo único que importa es el marketing y vaya que se ha demostrado que el horror vende... el éxito comercial de IT (2017) lo dejó en claro. A pesar de que el autor es un académico, el libro está escrito para que cualquier público pueda leerlo y darse una empapada de muchos temas interesantes e hitos que han marcado al horror. Le doy 4 estrellas porque el capítulo que habla de lo sobrentaural me paració un poco flojo, así como la reflexión sobre el folk horror que fue algo escueta y la cual me hubiera gustado que se profundizara más. Sin embargo esta es una lectura excelente para cualquier amante del género.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Leah

    Just when you thought it was safe... Since I started reading more classic horror and revisiting some classic science fiction, I’ve come across Darryl Jones many times, as the editor of various anthologies and as the writer of entertaining and informative introductions for some of the Oxford World’s Classics series. So when I discovered he had written a book on the history of horror, I felt there could be no better guide to a genre in which I’ve dabbled but still don’t know well. Jones is Professo Just when you thought it was safe... Since I started reading more classic horror and revisiting some classic science fiction, I’ve come across Darryl Jones many times, as the editor of various anthologies and as the writer of entertaining and informative introductions for some of the Oxford World’s Classics series. So when I discovered he had written a book on the history of horror, I felt there could be no better guide to a genre in which I’ve dabbled but still don’t know well. Jones is Professor of English Literature and Dean of the Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences at Trinity College Dublin. The book is deceptively small but it’s packed full of concentrated juicy goodness and, as I always find with Jones, written in an engaging and accessible style that avoids the tendency towards lit-crit jargonese so beloved of so many academic authors (and so hated by me). It begins with a great introductory chapter that discusses how horror has been around since at least the beginning of written records. Jones then gives manageable definitions for all the terms used in describing horror literature – horror, terror, Gothic, uncanny, weird, etc., (a true boon for the struggling amateur reviewer!). He talks about how horror in popular culture reflects the anxieties of its time: fear of invasion, nuclear armageddon, climate change, etc. Along the way he cites zillions of examples from both books and film, and what I really loved about it is that the ones he cites are the popular and familiar ones, rather than obscure ones known only to specialists and hardcore fans. This meant that I had the pleasure of knowing enough of them to enhance my understanding of what he was saying, while at the same time adding loads more to my must-read/watch list. He gives a clear idea of where they fall on the spectrum, so that I found it easy to decide which ones would be too gruesome or graphic for my moderate tastes. The following chapters are themed, again each packed full of examples. Starting with monsters, he discusses the origins of vampires and how they changed over time from aggrieved peasants into the aristocratic version of today, narcissistic, sexualised and romantic. Zombies originated as a response to plague fears, were later used as a commentary on slavery, and now, Jones suggests, as a response to extreme capitalism, especially after the crash. Next up, he discusses the supernatural – ghosts and the Devil. I found this chapter particularly interesting as he discusses the modern (i.e. 19th century and on) rise of the ghost story as a response to the shock to the Victorian psyche brought about by Darwin’s evolutionary theories – a theme I’ve become aware of in so much writing of that era. Likewise, the modern surge in stories starring the Devil and his worshippers, he suggests, may have risen out of Catholic attempts to redefine evil for a modern age and of Protestant beliefs in impending apocalypse. The next chapter looks at the use of the human body in horror, from werewolves and other forms of metamorphoses, through to pain, sadism and torture porn. Although this is the aspect of horror that appeals least to me – not at all, in fact – I still found the discussion interesting and was happy not to add too many new items to my to-be-read list. Horror and the mind is much more my kind of thing again, and Jones takes us into a world of madness and asylums, with Poe’s succession of insane narrators leading the way. He discusses perceptions of madness and how they have changed over time – is madness a symptom of evil, or is it a social and political construct? He mentions the prevalence of highly-qualified fictional madmen and muses as to whether madness is seen as a symptom of intelligence or over-education. He talks about the double – for example, Jekyll and Hyde – and how this has been used to portray a fracturing of the individual. And he leads us on to the serial killer, perhaps a response to the terrors of the anonymity of suburbia and of fractured communities, leaving people vulnerable to victimhood. No history of horror could be complete without the mad scientist. Jones takes us on a jaunt through the impact of Darwinism – Frankenstein, Dr Moreau, etc – and onto more modern iterations – the fear of nuclear holocaust, then evil machines, out-of-control androids and, most recently, the perils of artificial intelligence and the online age. In his afterword, Jones looks at how horror is faring in the new millennium. Though he is critical of the tendency towards remakes of old classics, he gives many examples in both book and film of original horror arising from today’s concerns – the economic crash, the environment, the continuing racial divide in America, etc. He discusses the rise in popularity in the West of horror from Asia, particularly Japan and Korea, and hints that this is perhaps an indication of the beginning of the decline of American cultural domination. He finishes with a brief look at horror moving online, into podcasts and memes and creepypasta*– a word I had never before heard but am now determined to use at every opportunity. (*Urbandictionary.com tells me that creepypasta are “essentially internet horror stories or a myth passed around other sites, to frighten readers and viewers”. Overall, an excellent read – short enough to be approachable but with plenty of breadth and depth in the discussions. And with five million (approximately) titles for me to follow up on... isn’t that a truly horrifying thought? NB This book was provided for review by the publisher, Oxford University Press. www.fictionfanblog.wordpress.com

  3. 5 out of 5

    Steve Wiggins

    Darryl Jones has written on horror before, and it is always a (guilty) pleasure to read his work on the subject. I mention on my blog (Sects and Violence in the Ancient World) that he approached the subject in a way that I have also been developing. It's always validating to see that another approves of your method while, at the same time, embarrassing not to be the first to publication. In any case in this book Jones traces the history of both literary and cinematic horror. He does so by dividin Darryl Jones has written on horror before, and it is always a (guilty) pleasure to read his work on the subject. I mention on my blog (Sects and Violence in the Ancient World) that he approached the subject in a way that I have also been developing. It's always validating to see that another approves of your method while, at the same time, embarrassing not to be the first to publication. In any case in this book Jones traces the history of both literary and cinematic horror. He does so by dividing chapters into types of monster—vampires, zombies, psychopaths, mad scientists, and potential future developments. Every chapter contains some insight and is a combination of description and analysis. It is clear Jones knows the subject very well and has read widely in the literature and watched intensely at the theater. Accessibly written, this is a fun book. The novelty cover (cutout of a light bulb) is clever, but makes for awkward handling. My fingers kept slipping through the cutout (it is a small format book) and I was afraid I'd tear the flyleaf. Otherwise it's a great book. I'm sure I'll come back to it as I read more on the topic.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Ginger Nuts

    Sleeping With the Lights on by Darryl Jones is one of those books that after reading the first couple of pages you end up feeling somewhat daunted by the prospect of reading the whole book, and yet you cannot stop yourself from gorging on it. There are a multitude of books on the market that take a scholarly approach to horror criticism and history of horror, most of the ones I have read have either been somewhat dry or lacking an in-depth analysis of the subject matter. Sleeping With the Lights Sleeping With the Lights on by Darryl Jones is one of those books that after reading the first couple of pages you end up feeling somewhat daunted by the prospect of reading the whole book, and yet you cannot stop yourself from gorging on it. There are a multitude of books on the market that take a scholarly approach to horror criticism and history of horror, most of the ones I have read have either been somewhat dry or lacking an in-depth analysis of the subject matter. Sleeping With the Lights On, bucks this trend to deliver one of the most fascinating and erudite discussions on our most beloved of genres. Darryl Jones is an English Literature Professor and Dean of the faculty of Arts, Humanity and Social Sciences at Trinity College Dublin, (which is just what a dyslexic semi-literate book reviewer needs when writing a review) and it shows throughout the book. It is clear that Jones is a gifted educator with his ability to disseminate his thoughts and theories on the history of horror and its place in the socio-political landscapes of horror existence is a joy to read. The complex notions that he puts forward can be challenging, however, he presents them in a way that it encourages you to think on what you have read, and then deliberate, cogitate and digest, and reach your own conclusions. Some sections required a few rereadings followed by many periods of faux intellectual chin rubbing before I fully understood some of the passages of this book, but at no point was I made to feel lacking at my comprehension of the text. READ THE FULL REVIEW HERE https://gingernutsofhorror.com/fictio...

  5. 4 out of 5

    Joelle Egan

    Darryl Jones manages to pack in a lot of information into a short volume in Sleeping with the Lights On: The Unsettling Story of Horror. In his introduction, Jones describes the long tradition of depicting horrific scenes in the works of lore and literature from the earliest civilizations. He discusses the “catharsis” theory that posits that images of violence can vicariously fulfill people’s natural inclinations without requiring overt action. In contrast, current psychologists have hypothesize Darryl Jones manages to pack in a lot of information into a short volume in Sleeping with the Lights On: The Unsettling Story of Horror. In his introduction, Jones describes the long tradition of depicting horrific scenes in the works of lore and literature from the earliest civilizations. He discusses the “catharsis” theory that posits that images of violence can vicariously fulfill people’s natural inclinations without requiring overt action. In contrast, current psychologists have hypothesized the idea that experiencing simulated violence can lead to an increase in equivalent behavior and acceptance. Jones uses the book to elaborate on his own idea that tales of horror are a way of testing limits and a reflection of the level of tolerance within a society. He clarifies the vocabulary of the genre and its subcategories, using examples from books, film, and podcasts. Jones demonstrates how humans may have common innate sources of anxiety and fear that span cultural differences, but that the form that these take varies over time and development. While some of our well-known external “monsters” have become iconic and have endured over time, other new ones have emerged due to advances in technology. Our increased knowledge about mental processes and illnesses has altered our understanding of non-normative behavior, leading to changes in how aberrant examples are perceived. Sleeping with the Lights On is concise and interesting, providing a nice overview to the history of horror and our underlying fascination with it. Jones also includes an appendix with additional resources for readers interested in more in-depth exploration. This is a great basic “primer” for a genre that is increasingly becoming accepted as a true art form.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Peter

    Oh dear! What started as a discourse on horror with the occasional lefty comment, by the end became a bizarre anti trump, anti white bashing exercise. WHY? This began as such a well written treatise on horror. Then you find out his specialist field... social studies, a subject that prepares people to be offended by everything and work in Mcdonalds. This would have been five star review if the author had stuck to his initial idea. ☹☹☹☹☹☹☹☹☹☹☹☹☹☹☹☹☹☹☹☹☹

  7. 4 out of 5

    Lauren • Gothic Bookworm

    I have a devilishly good read for you all…
I am reviewing Sleeping with the Lights On: The Unsettling Story of Horror by Darryl Jones (2018, Oxford: Oxford University Press) 
ISBN: 9780198826484 
Darryl Jones’ Sleeping with the Lights On is a comprehensive study of the manifestation of horror within the world today. From budding romances between vampires, to the classic phenomenon of violence and gore, Jones explores the realms of the supernatural through the human psyche – why do we seek to scare I have a devilishly good read for you all…
I am reviewing Sleeping with the Lights On: The Unsettling Story of Horror by Darryl Jones (2018, Oxford: Oxford University Press) 
ISBN: 9780198826484 
Darryl Jones’ Sleeping with the Lights On is a comprehensive study of the manifestation of horror within the world today. From budding romances between vampires, to the classic phenomenon of violence and gore, Jones explores the realms of the supernatural through the human psyche – why do we seek to scare ourselves? he asks, leading the way to understand why. 
The introduction explains how, as a society, we are fascinated by the macabre, death, and horror. Culture persists that we crave the mystery and darkness of the taboo, amounting to numerous medias to supply the demand. Jones gives a chronological summary to the history of horror, giving infamous examples such as Macbeth, Cannibal Holocaust, and Eaten Alive.  Jones then goes on to define and differentiate between Gothic, Horror, and Terror, and looks at the aesthetics and sensibilities that we as a society obsess over. The Uncanny and The Weird are also noted, along with popular anxieties, giving the text an inclusive timeline and overview of terms, specific texts, and themes of the genre. 
Chapter one titled ‘Monsters’, investigates the classic monsters typical of Gothic horror. Jones looks at the concept of a vampire, yet focuses on how the vampire went from a frightening creature of the night in Dracula (1897) to a love-struck teenager in Twilight (2005). As Jones begins, “[w]ith Romantic writers such as Byron and Polidori, the vampire became, importantly, both sexualised and aristocratic, a demon lover, running riot across poetry, fiction, and the theatre of the nineteenth century right up to the single most important text in the history of horror, Bram Stoker’s Dracula” (p.39). Jones looks at how the vampire went from an upper-class sexualised being which haunted our nightmares into a teenage fiction marvel that created a new kind of young adult fiction. Zombies are also the other horror monster featured in this chapter. Again, mapping out the background to the monster and then bringing it into a contemporary view, Jones creates a detailed overview of the Zombie and its impact on horror fiction. 
In chapter two titled ‘The Occult and the Supernatural’, Jones explains our obsession with everything dark and mysterious. From the spiritualist movement to believers in dark spells, this chapter focuses specifically on ‘The Devil’ and ‘Ghosts and Spirits.’ Jones says, “[m]any of our religions, our arts, our sciences, as well as our medicine, mathematics, and law, have their deep origins in magic. Sorcerers were the first professional class” (p.62). 
Chapters three and four explore the concept of ‘Horror and the Body’ and ‘Horror and the Mind’. Jones looks at the hybrid body, including that of the werewolf, its origins, and its role in horror media in the nineteenth, twentieth, and twenty-first century. He explains, “[s]ometimes lycanthropy is [a] straight forward curse, a misfortune brought upon an innocent through sheer bad luck, or as a result of a family history over which they have no control. This remains a significant impetus for modern cinematic lycanthropy” (p.84). Following on from the concept of the body, Jones then studies the horror inside the mind, citing his arguments for those who are ‘madmen’, such as the many protagonists of Edgar Allan Poe. Jones also looks as the ‘psycho’ and ‘slashers’ AKA, the serial killer, and our attraction we have to all things murderous, such as the killer in Se7en (1995) to Michael Myers in Halloween (1978).
In Jones’ final chapter, ‘Science and Horror’, we come to the formation of science fiction intertwined with the horror genre. From the figure of the Mad Scientist (think Dr Moreau in The Island of Dr Moreau, H. G. Wells, 1896) to the cinematic Frankenstein franchise (Bride of Frankenstein 1935, Son of Frankenstein 1939, Ghost of Frankenstein 1942 etc), one cannot underestimate the power of science within the horror genre, to which Jones focuses his argument on. 
The afterword examines contemporary Horror, and the millennial concept of the genre, bringing Jones’ argument into the twenty-first century. From monsters to curses, taboo themes and murderous serial killers, the horror genre is incredibly popular today, perhaps even more so than when the blood thirsty beasts first entered our nightmares.
Jones acknowledges that his text cannot amount to the ever-increasing power of the internet, yet his research not only acts as a map of horror, but ambitiously covers most of the notorious aspects of the genre, in both media and culture. His broad book covers all the areas one would expect a horror critique to contain, but also delves deeper into the macabre, something which is significant in today’s society. This text should not only be on every literature academic, but for anyone who is fascinated by the genre, either in book or film. 
Thank you to Anna Gell from the Oxford University Press for my review copy of Sleeping with the Lights On.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Josh Long

    The author successfully surveys the history of horror tastefully and categorically. There were more references to movies than I could count. However there was more personal commentary than a history account warrants. Good for horror fans!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Upen

    Darryl jones is a very intellectual writer and has covered the horror genre to the T. From monsters to zombies this book covers it all and actually explains the reality of horror in current and oat climates. Very enjoyable book for anyone needing a deeper understanding of the horror genre

  10. 4 out of 5

    K.

    The continuing popularity and success of the Gothic is in part an acknowledgement that there are whole areas of human existence about which realism has little or nothing to say: extreme psychological states and the limits of consciousness, for example; or profound existential, metaphysical, or spiritual questions; the paranormal and the supernatural.Interesting surface analysis of horror viewed through overarching themes: monsters, occult & supernatural, the body, the mind and science. Its faili The continuing popularity and success of the Gothic is in part an acknowledgement that there are whole areas of human existence about which realism has little or nothing to say: extreme psychological states and the limits of consciousness, for example; or profound existential, metaphysical, or spiritual questions; the paranormal and the supernatural.Interesting surface analysis of horror viewed through overarching themes: monsters, occult & supernatural, the body, the mind and science. Its failing, in my opinion, is how very Western-minded it is. Asian and Hispanic horror cinema/literature merit a bare mention in "Afterword: Horror Since the Millennium" and nothing at all said about other regions of the world, not even a excuse of brevity.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jim

    I'm not one to pick up academic texts for pleasure reading but the subject matter (and styling of this beautiful book!) piqued my interest. Not so much an in-depth analysis as a great primer on the sociological, psychological, and cultural impact and significance of horror in literature and film. Jones choses to focus his examination of the genre around monsters, the occult/supernatural, science and horror, body horror, horror of the mind, and horror in the new millennium. All in all, I think th I'm not one to pick up academic texts for pleasure reading but the subject matter (and styling of this beautiful book!) piqued my interest. Not so much an in-depth analysis as a great primer on the sociological, psychological, and cultural impact and significance of horror in literature and film. Jones choses to focus his examination of the genre around monsters, the occult/supernatural, science and horror, body horror, horror of the mind, and horror in the new millennium. All in all, I think this book gave me a greater appreciation and understanding of why horror matters and why it appeals to me so much.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Johnny

    This was an impressive overview of the history of horror, from Euripides to Jordan Peele. Jones defines "horror" more loosely than most critics, which effectively allows him to draw from a wider range of references to support his analysis. Most of his insights I found valuable, but his concept of "unhorror," which he introduces late in the book, with little to no support, contradicts much of the rest of his analysis and distracts from his otherwise valuable musings on the post-millennial strains This was an impressive overview of the history of horror, from Euripides to Jordan Peele. Jones defines "horror" more loosely than most critics, which effectively allows him to draw from a wider range of references to support his analysis. Most of his insights I found valuable, but his concept of "unhorror," which he introduces late in the book, with little to no support, contradicts much of the rest of his analysis and distracts from his otherwise valuable musings on the post-millennial strains of economic and ecological horror.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Annarella

    A very good book that analyze what the different type of "horror" are, how they changed and what changed in this last years. It's very detailed, well researched, wonderfully written and you're hooked since the beginning as it's such an interesting book. Highly recommended! Many thanks to Oxford University Press and Edelweiss for this ARC

  14. 5 out of 5

    Phil On The Hill

    An academic study of horror. The main focus is on large themes: Monsters; Body; Mind etc. Enjoyable, but ultimately a bit disappointing, skimming some areas (e.g. fiction of the 1970s, splatterpunk of the 1990s and c osmic horror of the 2010s). The overall coverage is good, but I was hoping for more new references. Worth a read if you enjoy horror.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Alexandra Pearson

    Jones gets a lot of information into this slim book without ever feeling as though he's rushing or missing things out. Given the depth and width of the contents, I'm surprised OUP didn't release this as a Very Short Introduction to Horror, but then we wouldn't have got the beautiful cover. A must read for any fan of horror or popular culture in general.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Katia M. Davis

    A relatively brief but good overview of the history of horror in its many forms. Each chapter could easily have been a book I its own right if the author had had enough space...or time. I enjoyed the inclusion of psychology, physiology, and sociology to not only suggest why we create horror, but why some of us are seemingly drawn to it. A good little read.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Gloria

    An intriguing and comprehensive insight into horror and it's impact on the world at large - and it's pocket sized. Dealing with myth, movies, books, history, and anxieties if the times, this is a great gateway book to anyone interested in the long, rich history of horror.

  18. 5 out of 5

    despina

    I hated this book.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Chris Hagen

    More academic than I was expecting and then not thorough enough to be worth it as an academic work

  20. 5 out of 5

    Chad Brock

    3.5

  21. 5 out of 5

    JP Conroy

    This is horror in a nutshell!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Rae

    A concise but satisfying whirlwind tour of different aspects of horror, pulling in cultural and psychological points of view and an impressive range of sources.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Karen

    A slim overview of the elements of horror in film and literature (mostly film). A nice read with some interesting thoughts.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Christopher

    Must-read for horror fans. Whip-smart, comprehensive (and yet short).

  25. 5 out of 5

    Em

    Very nice insight into horror in both literature and cinema. Well researched with interesting perspectives

  26. 4 out of 5

    Kirsten

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jenna

  28. 4 out of 5

    Derek Johnston

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jesse

  30. 5 out of 5

    Julia Verbanic

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