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Taste and See: Discovering God among Butchers, Bakers, and Fresh Food Makers

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Embark on a global adventure to descend into a salt mine, knead bread, harvest olives, and pluck fresh figs. What you discover will forever change the way you read the Bible--and approach every meal. Also includes delicious recipes. One of America's most beloved teachers and writers, Margaret Feinberg, goes on a remarkable journey to unearth God's perspective on food. She wr Embark on a global adventure to descend into a salt mine, knead bread, harvest olives, and pluck fresh figs. What you discover will forever change the way you read the Bible--and approach every meal. Also includes delicious recipes. One of America's most beloved teachers and writers, Margaret Feinberg, goes on a remarkable journey to unearth God's perspective on food. She writes that since the opening of creation, God, the Master Chef, seeds the world with pomegranates and passionfruit, beans and greens and tangerines. When the Israelites wander in the desert for forty years, God, the Pastry Chef, delivers the sweet bread of heaven. After arriving in the Promised Land, God reveals himself as Barbecue Master, delighting in meat sacrifices. Like his Foodie Father, Jesus throws the disciples an unforgettable two-course farewell supper to be repeated until his return. This groundbreaking book provides a culinary exploration of Scripture. You'll descend 400 feet below ground into the frosty white caverns of a salt mine, fish on the Sea of Galilee, bake fresh matzo at Yale University, ferry to a remote island in Croatia to harvest olives, spend time with a Texas butcher known as "the meat apostle," and wander a California farm with one of the world's premier fig farmers. With each visit, Margaret asks, "How do you read these Scriptures, not as theologians, but in light of what you do every day?" Their answers will forever change the way you read the Bible--and approach every meal. Taste and See is a delicious read that includes dozens of recipes for those who, like Margaret, believe some of life's richest moments are spent savoring a meal with those you love. Perhaps God's foodie focus is meant to do more than satisfy our bellies. It's meant to heal our souls, as we learn to taste and see the goodness of God together. After all, food is God's love made edible. See you around the table!


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Embark on a global adventure to descend into a salt mine, knead bread, harvest olives, and pluck fresh figs. What you discover will forever change the way you read the Bible--and approach every meal. Also includes delicious recipes. One of America's most beloved teachers and writers, Margaret Feinberg, goes on a remarkable journey to unearth God's perspective on food. She wr Embark on a global adventure to descend into a salt mine, knead bread, harvest olives, and pluck fresh figs. What you discover will forever change the way you read the Bible--and approach every meal. Also includes delicious recipes. One of America's most beloved teachers and writers, Margaret Feinberg, goes on a remarkable journey to unearth God's perspective on food. She writes that since the opening of creation, God, the Master Chef, seeds the world with pomegranates and passionfruit, beans and greens and tangerines. When the Israelites wander in the desert for forty years, God, the Pastry Chef, delivers the sweet bread of heaven. After arriving in the Promised Land, God reveals himself as Barbecue Master, delighting in meat sacrifices. Like his Foodie Father, Jesus throws the disciples an unforgettable two-course farewell supper to be repeated until his return. This groundbreaking book provides a culinary exploration of Scripture. You'll descend 400 feet below ground into the frosty white caverns of a salt mine, fish on the Sea of Galilee, bake fresh matzo at Yale University, ferry to a remote island in Croatia to harvest olives, spend time with a Texas butcher known as "the meat apostle," and wander a California farm with one of the world's premier fig farmers. With each visit, Margaret asks, "How do you read these Scriptures, not as theologians, but in light of what you do every day?" Their answers will forever change the way you read the Bible--and approach every meal. Taste and See is a delicious read that includes dozens of recipes for those who, like Margaret, believe some of life's richest moments are spent savoring a meal with those you love. Perhaps God's foodie focus is meant to do more than satisfy our bellies. It's meant to heal our souls, as we learn to taste and see the goodness of God together. After all, food is God's love made edible. See you around the table!

30 review for Taste and See: Discovering God among Butchers, Bakers, and Fresh Food Makers

  1. 5 out of 5

    Sherri

    Feinberg selects certain foods from the Bible and goes around the globe in research and searching the Biblical significance. Wow! Makes me think of food in the Bible differently. Fun writing and recipes included. Looking forward to doing this study.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Melissajoy

    You might want to grab a snack before you start this book, because it’s going to make you hungry - physically and spiritually. Margaret Feinberg shows us that God really does want us to TASTE and See that the Lord is good. She points out examples from God’s Word that food and fellowship can and should be used to draw us closer to Him. Each chapter takes the reader of an adventure that leads you deeper into God’s Word and finishes with multiple recipes to try at home. Whether you read this book on y You might want to grab a snack before you start this book, because it’s going to make you hungry - physically and spiritually. Margaret Feinberg shows us that God really does want us to TASTE and See that the Lord is good. She points out examples from God’s Word that food and fellowship can and should be used to draw us closer to Him. Each chapter takes the reader of an adventure that leads you deeper into God’s Word and finishes with multiple recipes to try at home. Whether you read this book on your own or with a group of fellow foodies, you are sure to delighted. And hungry.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Courtney

    My soul craved this book and I didn’t even know it! It has brought me closer to God and the people around my table. I have a feeling it will be one I keep coming back to and reflecting on. Now, I can’t wait to try out all the recipes!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Kelsey Hinton

    I loved this book so much! It was a fascinating read and I learned so much I didn’t know about the historical context and culture of the Bible from a food perspective. It challenged me in my faith and made me want to cook everything in the book at the same time! I’d love to try out another book by Margaret Feinberg because I enjoyed her style of writing.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    This was a really interesting bible study. It made me look at and appreciate food in a different, more spiritual, way.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Brantly

    Read Supper of the Lamb (Robert Farrar Capon) instead. 2.5 stars. Rounded up... Might be some good recipes

  7. 5 out of 5

    Greta Schrock

    I was invited to join the Launch Team for this book. I have loved everything Margaret Feinberg has written and her new book is more of her wonderful writing. Taste and See is a look at how the God's gift of food speaks to His love for us. Some make food a evil thing to be avoided so they can wear skinny jeans, or the drug of comfort or use it as a tool of control against something we struggle against. Food is, always has been, and in God's economy always will be, a gift. It is God's creative mea I was invited to join the Launch Team for this book. I have loved everything Margaret Feinberg has written and her new book is more of her wonderful writing. Taste and See is a look at how the God's gift of food speaks to His love for us. Some make food a evil thing to be avoided so they can wear skinny jeans, or the drug of comfort or use it as a tool of control against something we struggle against. Food is, always has been, and in God's economy always will be, a gift. It is God's creative means to help us stay alive, is an outlet for hospitality to others and a tool for the celebration of life's greatest moments with others. I highly recommend this book for your reading pleasure. I could not put it down.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Peggy

    I wanted it to be meatier (pun intended) than it was but it was still extremely helpful in a few chapters in connecting foods and their meaning. I felt like the chapters on olives, dates, and bread were the most helpful and well done. The light give here was worth it. Not a deep dive but definitely a good exposure to these ideas.

  9. 5 out of 5

    JennanneJ

    1. Go to store. 2. Buy olives, figs, bread, fish, meat. 3. Read this book. This is a quick and easy read. It is fun to read more about the food of the Bible. The food used for feasts and the food used in stories, parables and illustrations of the Bible. I wouldn't say this is a meaty book (Whoops! LOL), or theologically heavy, but it is a fun, lighter read.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Erin Laramore

    4.5 Stars for this look at how food in the Bible can help us better understand Bilblical culture. We need food to live. God starts the Bible in a garden full of fruit trees and food that man cultivated and ends in the Wedding feast of the Lamb. I first heard of Margaret Feinberg at a Women of Joy conference last summer. She spoke on this subject matter as this book had recently released at the time. Hearing her speak of the importance of Olives (did you know that Gethsemane was an olive press? D 4.5 Stars for this look at how food in the Bible can help us better understand Bilblical culture. We need food to live. God starts the Bible in a garden full of fruit trees and food that man cultivated and ends in the Wedding feast of the Lamb. I first heard of Margaret Feinberg at a Women of Joy conference last summer. She spoke on this subject matter as this book had recently released at the time. Hearing her speak of the importance of Olives (did you know that Gethsemane was an olive press? Did you know that olive oil was what was used to anoint priests and kings?), salt (as in, you are the salt of the earth....), and other food items, I knew I wanted to read this book. The research Ms. Feinberg did was pretty amazing - from exporing salt mines in Utah, a bread kitchen at Yale and a fig farm in California, to fishing in the Sea of Galilee, picking Olives in Croatia, and meeting the Meat Apostle in Texas. She also celebrated Passover while in Israel and shared all of those experiences as well as how they brought the food related scriptures to life. Though I'm not a "foodie" by any stretch, for those who are, there are also several recipes at the end of each chapter as well. I would recommend to those who want to get a unique "taste" of the Bible as well as people who enjoy food in general.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Kathy Bailey

    I am reviewing the first three chapters of Margaret Feinberg's new book, Taste and See. After reading Margaret's book, Scouting the Divine: My Search for God in Wine, Wool and Wild Honey, I started to realize the significance of so many details in the scriptures that had been insignificant to me before. The Bible can be compared to the layers of an onion: there are so many layers that every time you read it you uncover more tasty morsels. Speaking of tasty morsels, the first three chapters of Ta I am reviewing the first three chapters of Margaret Feinberg's new book, Taste and See. After reading Margaret's book, Scouting the Divine: My Search for God in Wine, Wool and Wild Honey, I started to realize the significance of so many details in the scriptures that had been insignificant to me before. The Bible can be compared to the layers of an onion: there are so many layers that every time you read it you uncover more tasty morsels. Speaking of tasty morsels, the first three chapters of Taste and See burst with flavor and richness as Margaret writes about gathering at the table with others in fellowship to taste God's goodness, fishing in the Sea of Galilee, and harvesting figs in California. God is "good"! Food is "good"! Have you ever noticed how similar the spelling of these two words is? I love this quote from Taste and See: "Food was not created just to satiate our bellies, but create a place where God can meet us and fill our hearts." Margaret's new book gives us a recipe for a richer relationship with God by exploring the metaphorical richness of food in the Bible. I invite you to come to the table and read this amazing book. You will never look at the mention of food in the Bible the same way again.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Misty Johnston

    I am so excited because, I was chosen to be a part of the book launch team and have received the first three chapters. If you have read and love Scooting the Divine, The Scared Echo, Fight Back with Joy, Wonder Struck, The Organic God, and Hungry for God as much as I do this book will not disappoint. Margaret Feinberg again teaches us a new and exciting way to see God in everyday things. In this book she introduces us to new people and new places. Her writing paints a picture in your mind and yo I am so excited because, I was chosen to be a part of the book launch team and have received the first three chapters. If you have read and love Scooting the Divine, The Scared Echo, Fight Back with Joy, Wonder Struck, The Organic God, and Hungry for God as much as I do this book will not disappoint. Margaret Feinberg again teaches us a new and exciting way to see God in everyday things. In this book she introduces us to new people and new places. Her writing paints a picture in your mind and you feel like you are there. If you are looking for a book to help you get back in touch with the one who created you and the wonderful food He created for you this is the book. Taste and See is a wonderful journey through scripture using food to bring you closer to God.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Styf

    I never would have picked up this book if I hadn't been assigned reading before a writing conference partially led by the author, but here we are. Feinberg puts food and faith into a perspective that I have never considered before. For years, I've continually brought up the idea of communion being a literary motif in many works of fiction that my students read, but I had never considered how communion, the act of breaking bread with fellow believers, plays such a significant role throughout scri I never would have picked up this book if I hadn't been assigned reading before a writing conference partially led by the author, but here we are. Feinberg puts food and faith into a perspective that I have never considered before. For years, I've continually brought up the idea of communion being a literary motif in many works of fiction that my students read, but I had never considered how communion, the act of breaking bread with fellow believers, plays such a significant role throughout scripture, long before Jesus performed the Last Supper for his disciples. This book encouraged a new way to look at both the Bible and the world, at my relationships with food and with people. I am so glad that I was required to read it.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Suzanna

    FIVE STARS. Love food? Read this book. Interested in the Bible? Read this book. Want to know more about Jeus? Read this book. Ever wonder if God is intentional with the small details? Read this book. I picked this one up on the recommendation of an author I very much admire and relate to, and I was blown away by how good and impactful it is. I loved how informative it was not only on the fascinating bits about the foods talked about, but also on how much those foods tie so much into who God is and wh FIVE STARS. Love food? Read this book. Interested in the Bible? Read this book. Want to know more about Jeus? Read this book. Ever wonder if God is intentional with the small details? Read this book. I picked this one up on the recommendation of an author I very much admire and relate to, and I was blown away by how good and impactful it is. I loved how informative it was not only on the fascinating bits about the foods talked about, but also on how much those foods tie so much into who God is and who He desires for us to be. I stopped often to savor (wink wink, hahaha) the tidbits she shared from her personal experiences as well as her research and knowing Scripture. This one's a re-read for sure, and often! Friends, do yourself a favor and purchase this book ASAP!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Shelley Connelie

    As part of the Taste and See launch team, I've been given the opportunity to read and review the first three chapters of Margaret Feinberg's latest offering and, from the opening sentences, I am hooked! Margaret has a wonderful way of presenting scripture in a contemporary and meaningful way, drawing the reader in to a personal experience that speaks to the hunger we all have to be in community with God and with each other. I can't WAIT to read this book in it's entirety!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Candice Poindexter

    Honored to be part of a team that received the first three chapters of this book. I've heard Margaret speak at Women of Joy twice and had the pleasure of meeting her last May. I'm a huge fan of hers. Scouting the Divine was awesome, and this new book promises to be another favorite. Reading Margaret's book is like having a conversation with a good friend who never fails to not only make you feel better but helps you see important truths in a new light.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Mira Prater

    I have loved studying this book this summer. It’s all about how food is holy and how that idea is prevalent in The Bible. Feinberg travels across the globe investigating the biblical stories of some of the most prominent foods mentioned in The Bible. Her writing makes you feel like you’re right there, tasting a fig or an olive. It includes recipes and I can’t wait to try some of them.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Mary Reilly

    Four and 1/2 stars. The author is a Jewish roots girl so she pretty much had me when she began with fishing in the Galilee. Biblically sound and an encouragement to eat mindfully, invite others to the table and continually thank the Lord for his gift of food.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Michelle Slomp

    This book blends cooking, foods with deep theology and teachings that takes the reader through a journey.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    A verse that has become a refrain in my life is John 10:10 which reminds me that Jesus came to give us life to the abundance. Taste & See is a book that further emphasizes this for me. I loved learning the importance of food mentioned in the Bible, the historical context, what the original audience would instinctually know to be true and for the ways God uses sustenance to provide, mystify and delight us. This quick read will be one I return to for satisfying insights (and yummy recipes of cours A verse that has become a refrain in my life is John 10:10 which reminds me that Jesus came to give us life to the abundance. Taste & See is a book that further emphasizes this for me. I loved learning the importance of food mentioned in the Bible, the historical context, what the original audience would instinctually know to be true and for the ways God uses sustenance to provide, mystify and delight us. This quick read will be one I return to for satisfying insights (and yummy recipes of course)

  21. 4 out of 5

    Trevor Limberg

    Margaret's writing style is almost as delectable as the food she's discovering more about! I loved this book, and learned much from it!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Katie Krombein

    All of the Around the Table activities and discussions were really thoughtful p. 12: As the German author and poet Christian Morgenstern writes, "Home is not the building you live in; home is wherever you are understood." p. 16: Inherent in every human are longings for meaning and purpose. We yearn to know that God still cares and that the details of our lives really matter. We desire friends who will make us laugh and cry and feel again. We long to be recognized by someone who thinks we're specia All of the Around the Table activities and discussions were really thoughtful p. 12: As the German author and poet Christian Morgenstern writes, "Home is not the building you live in; home is wherever you are understood." p. 16: Inherent in every human are longings for meaning and purpose. We yearn to know that God still cares and that the details of our lives really matter. We desire friends who will make us laugh and cry and feel again. We long to be recognized by someone who thinks we're special and smart--and maybe even funny or a little sexy, on our best days. As humans, we hunger for so many things that extend beyond physical appetite. We hunger to know and to be known. We hunger for others to accept, understand, and adore us. We hunger to have someone to love and cherish with our affection. Knowing we were created this way, I began to suspect that food was created not just to satiate our bellies as we gather around the table but to create a place where God could meet us and fill our hearts. p. 22: When we gather to eat, God wants to nourish more than our bodies: He wants to nourish our sols with transcendent joy and supernatural community and divine presence. When we feed our physical appetites in community, we open our hearts for God to feed something deeper as well. He has connected our bodies and bellies to our spirits and souls. That, it seems, is the way God has designed us. God created us to give and receive, not just in our bodies but in our spirits. p. 44: The Sea of Galilee exudes a calmness that stills my soul. My eyes wander along the emerald coast. This is more than a spot where water meets land: it's where heaven intersected earth; where Jesus displayed the power of God to mere mortals. To the north, Jesus once fed five thousand with five bricks of barley and a pair of sardines. A few miles away he repeated the miracle for four thousand. A little further and Peter caught the carp that provided the temple tax. My eyes scan the lake where Jesus calmed wicked storms, not once, but twice. And upon these waters, Jesus strolled with ease. I'm surrounded by grand displays of God's power. This landscape is marked by the miraculous in every direction. This is easy to recognize when you're beside the Galilee, overlooking the waters where Jesus lived. But the experience isn't limited to people with the time and resources to make the trek to Israel. Christ wants us to see these vistas in our daily lives. He wants us to awaken to all the places God unleashes mightiness--in our past and present, so we can look forward to a faith-filled future. The provision supplied. The storms calmed. The relationships restored. p. 47: AROUND THE TABLE: Now imagine that you're sitting on the bank, looking around the coast at the miracles that Jesus has done in your life. People you met. Jobs you landed. Provision you needed. Healing you desired. Grace you experienced. On the map, note places around the lake where Jesus has displayed his power in your life. Then share some of these miracles with one another. p. 78: Wherever a passage refers to leaven or yeast, I interpreted the mention with modern ears. I'd imagine the baker reaching for an outside ingredient like a packet of Fleishmann's rapid-rise to make dough bubble. Alas, commercial yeast wasn't even invented until 1868. Instead the ancient Israelites use the same ingredients people work with today to make sourdough bread: water, flour, and time (and sometimes a starter ball of dough from a previous baking that is comprised of--you guessed it--water, flour, and time). This illuminates Jesus's warning to beware the yeast of the Pharisees and Sadducees. This isn't a cautionary advisement against an outside contaminant. Rather, Jesus says, the same leaven that's in them is already in you. Our real enemy isn't what we see in others but what rises within us. The judgmental nature, the critical eye, the insidious pride we notice in others, wait to rise up in us too. Maybe you've felt the leaven bubbling in your heart. ...Of course, Jesus tells us to beware of the hametz. The only antidote to the leaven of sin is Christ's work in us. We must invite Christ to pull us away from our judgments, tear open our intentions, and scour our hearts. When we do this, we are able to live in a closer relationship with God and others. p. 88: From the beginning, bread was shared around a table--a table of working together, a table of living together, a table of vulnerability, a table of sacrifice, a table of thanksgiving. God set this table for the Israelites in the wilderness so they remember their deliverance. Christ set this table for the disciples in the upper room so we remember his sacrifice. With every morsel of manna, God whispers that we are never meant to go it alone. With every morsel of communion, God whispers that we are never meant to go it alone. p. 111+: Biblical source was always sourced and harvested with its surrounding minerals. That becomes highly significant when Jesus declares, "You are the salt of the earth." With these words, Jesus awakens each of us to our divine purpose. We are agents of preserving. ...In essence, Jesus tells his disciples and us today: We are agents of preserving. God has placed us in this culture, in this time, in this moment, in this slice of history, to preserve the ways, the teachings, the life, the power, the presence of Christ. But salt does more than preserve; it also seasons, unlocking delicious flavor...as the salt of the earth, we are agents of flavoring. Our purpose is to bring the taste of heaven to earth wherever we go. p.113: Luke clarifies that when Jesus warns of losing our saltiness, he's not describing table salt; he's describing fertilizer salt. Yes, as the salt of the earth, we are agents of human flourishing. Jesus is calling us to be fertilizer in his kingdom. We are the salt poured on the which is foul in order to foster fresh, new life. We are created to help others blossom and bud as they pursue the life God intends. Flourishing lives demonstrate evidence of the kingdom of God. p. 149: Both Abraham and Job's immense amounts of livestock illustrate their wealth. The psalmist even boasts of the riches of God in terms of animal husbandry as the Lord owns the cattle on a thousand hills. ...Those living in an agrarian context understand the declaration in a deeper way. Possessing cattle implies owning the land where the livestock roams. A measure of one thousand hills suggests God's property extends an immeasurable distance, and cattle in the Bible refer to a variety of livestock including sheep and goats. Their grazing habits complement each other in ideal situations. Cattle go first on the hills and graze the best grasses. Sheep follow behind and clean up the remains. Goats eat what none of the others will. Together they'll graze on a piece of land until it's stripped clean of green. When the land is allowed to rest for a month, the vegetation springs back. God's majesty appears in the creatures, the creation, and the created order. The vaults of God's wealth run deeper. Unlike our modern culture today, ancient Israelites knew the real value of the animal is found in the length of its life, not its brevity. Cows, goats, and sheep provide an ongoing high protein source of milk, which can be turned into cheese. Newborns help the flock to multiply. Meanwhile, sheep provide wool for clothing and blankets. In describing God as owning cattle on a thousand hills, the psalmist paints a powerful image of God as Creator and Sustainer and Owner. God has the best and most abundant resources for all generations. Feeling discouraged? Remember your God owns the cattle on a thousand hills. Trapped in a scarcity mindset? Be reminded that your God owns the cattle on a thousand hills. Worried about the future? Rest in knowing your God owns the cattle on a thousand hills. p. 173: May your table be set, not just with food but vulnerability and delight. May your mouth be filled, not just with morsels of meat but with reminders of God's lovingkindness. And may every meal at which you find yourself be a foretaste of the feast to come.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Gabrielle Stoller

    I am doing this for the "Book with Food in it" Category in Extreme Book Nerd. I would also give this 3.5 stars. This book immediately intrigued me when I saw it at Barnes and Noble. It's a universally known fact that I am a foodie. So to find a Spiritual text with the byline of "Discovering God Among Butchers, Bakers, and Fresh Food Makers," I was hooked. There are so many instances in the Bible where food is the center. Indeed, Christ is the "Bread of Life," "Fount of Living Water" "the Lamb of I am doing this for the "Book with Food in it" Category in Extreme Book Nerd. I would also give this 3.5 stars. This book immediately intrigued me when I saw it at Barnes and Noble. It's a universally known fact that I am a foodie. So to find a Spiritual text with the byline of "Discovering God Among Butchers, Bakers, and Fresh Food Makers," I was hooked. There are so many instances in the Bible where food is the center. Indeed, Christ is the "Bread of Life," "Fount of Living Water" "the Lamb of God"...I could keep going. "Taste and See" is Margaret's dive into discovery. Where can we find God in the process of refining olive oil? What can be learned in a salt mine? What life lessons can we learn during the process of making matzo (which has to be done in 18 minutes or less) I found myself wanting to go to the Holy Land and to the Mediterranean.. There is something to be said about the food and the culture there. Why did I not review the book higher you might ask? Well.....I wanted more direct Scripture references. I wanted to be looking up Scriptures. I understood everything that was being discussed and put forth and shared. Perhaps I would enjoy this more as a devotional. Or a book study. Still, I am very happy that I read it! I got some good quotes from it. Also, to be reading Christian nonfiction again felt good. It had been a while

  24. 5 out of 5

    PollyAnna Joy

    ♡♡♡♡♡ Margaret's books have been on my radar since I first found FIGHT BACK WITH JOY, so it was a no-brainer for me to purchase and read TASTE AND SEE by her. And, again, I have not been disappointed. Margaret does her research, yes, AND she loves Jesus, AND she loves the Word of God. I love her heart. I am now underlining every mention of any and all foods in the Bible and digging deeper into what God says about foods!!! One thing that stood out the most for me was when Margaret told us about s ♡♡♡♡♡ Margaret's books have been on my radar since I first found FIGHT BACK WITH JOY, so it was a no-brainer for me to purchase and read TASTE AND SEE by her. And, again, I have not been disappointed. Margaret does her research, yes, AND she loves Jesus, AND she loves the Word of God. I love her heart. I am now underlining every mention of any and all foods in the Bible and digging deeper into what God says about foods!!! One thing that stood out the most for me was when Margaret told us about something from te Talmud: "if someone is suffering and in need, and you can take away 1/60 of their pain, then that is goodness, and the call to help is from God" (114). You'll have to read the book to get the context!! ♡

  25. 4 out of 5

    Megan Ericson

    I thought it would be more of a cookbook with some explanations but Margeret takes you on a complete journey through food and it's significance in the Bible. I'm learning so much already and her writing is captivating!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Leeds

    I kept picturing a scene from the chef's table show on Netflix with the violins getting dramatic & artistic. Lots of dog eared pages and a handful of great underlines. Even shared a section with my Bible study. Well done. I kept picturing a scene from the chef's table show on Netflix with the violins getting dramatic & artistic. Lots of dog eared pages and a handful of great underlines. Even shared a section with my Bible study. Well done.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Kristen

    I have long considered myself both a foodie and a Christ-follower, but Margaret’s insights have opened my eyes to how much I’ve been missing over the last few years. As our daughters have grown, our schedules have become so crazy, and my life as a mom has become more and more fast-paced, so too have our family meals. My time with friends around a table, shared conversations over a warm beverage, and the invitations to friends or family to gather at our home are fewer and further in between. Some I have long considered myself both a foodie and a Christ-follower, but Margaret’s insights have opened my eyes to how much I’ve been missing over the last few years. As our daughters have grown, our schedules have become so crazy, and my life as a mom has become more and more fast-paced, so too have our family meals. My time with friends around a table, shared conversations over a warm beverage, and the invitations to friends or family to gather at our home are fewer and further in between. Some of my fondest memories from childhood are when families from would gather after church on Sunday evenings for food and fellowship - grown-ups would sit and talk around the kitchen table, the kids would come in for cookies and sweet treats and then run out to wherever the kids were gathering. I loved those evenings and it turns out my parents did too. Somewhere along the way, I had neglected both the time spent on preparing food for others AND inviting others to share in what I had prepared. Margaret asks the question “What are we really hungry for?” and then walks us through her research into discovering the answers to that for herself. I am so thankful she shared her journey with us. As it turns out, Margaret discovered that “God was the original foodie.” She breaks down Biblical truths about food and fellowship and helps explain how God longs to feed both our bodies AND our souls. I was grateful to be part of the pre-launch team and was able to read the first 3 chapters just before the holidays. It really helped give me a new perspective on preparing the meals and treats for everyone who had gathered at my home during that time - I was able to view it as a blessing instead of a chore. I received the full copy just after Christmas and devoured the pages over leftover cookies and coffee. It challenged me to start my new year being more intentional about my relationship with God and with those around me. Margaret shares “...we must start to think differently about the fruitfulness in our daily lives. God invites us to find our satisfaction in him, in the fruit he’s yielding in us week after week, season after season, in quantities we never thought possible and in layers of jammy flavors we’ve never known before.” I intend to taste all of the jammy flavors God has for me and to share HIS fruitfulness with those I’m blessed to come into contact with each day.

  28. 5 out of 5

    April Swiger

    I had the privilege of spending a few days getting to know Margaret this past Fall. She is beautifully sincere, witty, and intelligent, and her love for God and others is apparent. A few months later, when Margaret shared about the opportunity to read the first three chapters of Taste and See before it officially launched, I was thrilled to accept. I come from a long line of foodies, and have pursued cooking fresh ingredients from scratch for my family for almost a decade. I knew her book was go I had the privilege of spending a few days getting to know Margaret this past Fall. She is beautifully sincere, witty, and intelligent, and her love for God and others is apparent. A few months later, when Margaret shared about the opportunity to read the first three chapters of Taste and See before it officially launched, I was thrilled to accept. I come from a long line of foodies, and have pursued cooking fresh ingredients from scratch for my family for almost a decade. I knew her book was going to be something special before I even began reading it. What I didn't realize was how much it would affect me on a spiritual level. I was immediately captivated with the first chapter and how Margaret connected the significance of food and God's goodness in our lives. She set the stage for where the book was going to take us, and how the goal is for the reader to never read the Bible the same way again (SPOILER: Her goal was absolutely accomplished, at least in my life!). She then goes on to share about her trip to the Sea of Galilee, and the hilarious moments of fishing with a group of men (one in their underwear), as well as the cultural experience she had with the local people and places she visited. The next chapter brings the reader to a fig farm, and we get a fascinating lesson on this tasty little fruit and its significance in Scripture. Margaret successfully weaves together something as simple (yet necessary for life!) as the food on our plates into a deeper love for the God who created us in His image. Shortly after reading the second chapter, her account of fishing in the Sea of Galilee, I found myself in Matthew 4 reading about Jesus calling the first disciples while they were fishing. I camped out on those verses for longer than usual as I remembered the details Margaret shared about the necessary work of cleaning, mending, and hanging up fishing nets after a catch, and how stunning it was that when Jesus called to his disciples they left that work *immediately*. Margaret, your goal was accomplished. Taste and See has given me a fresh perspective on Scripture (and some delicious new recipes to try along the way). I now read verses that i've read for years with new eyes and new information to process them through. Friend, do not miss out on the tasty morsels God may have for you in Taste and See!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Emily P

    As a home cook that loves to know the background behind her favorite dishes, I thought "Taste and See" was an engrossing read. I have read one of Feinberg's books prior to this, which I loved. Her style of writing is at once simple and profound. In "Taste and See," Feinberg goes beyond curiosity, deciding to begin a journey to see how foods that are related to Scripture are crafted, created and cooked. Once you begin the book, you will not want to pause, unless it is to try one of the amazing re As a home cook that loves to know the background behind her favorite dishes, I thought "Taste and See" was an engrossing read. I have read one of Feinberg's books prior to this, which I loved. Her style of writing is at once simple and profound. In "Taste and See," Feinberg goes beyond curiosity, deciding to begin a journey to see how foods that are related to Scripture are crafted, created and cooked. Once you begin the book, you will not want to pause, unless it is to try one of the amazing recipes peppered in between chapters. Feinberg describes her journey of baking, cooking and harvesting foods that are central to Biblical daily life, such as olives, bread, lamb, salt and fish. Feinberg was not content to go to the local supermarket to grab different types of these items. She chose to seek out bakers who double as seminary professors, butchers who are passionate about knowing how your meat is processed, olive growers in Croatia and fisherman in Israel, just to name a few. Throughout the process, Feinberg shares Scriptural stories that connect these different foods and the people associated with them, both in the past and the present. Feinberg has a lyrical way of melding the mundane with the extraordinary. sharing her personal observations during her exploits around the world. She finds extended family in the most unlikely of places and learns just how much food is connected to culture and community. You will finish this book with a reminder that it's not about the food, but the lives drawn closer to each other by the shared practice of breaking bread. I recommend this book to anyone who wants to expand their culinary expertise and learn about food's role in Scripture. There is a Bible study also associated with this book which I would love to offer soon at the church we attend. Thankful I read this!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Janet

    I have read the 1st three chapters of this book, and I want to share with you the great opportunity available if you are interested in this book! There is a free online Bible study starting 1-21-19, which is the time this book officially releases. (I got 3 chapters early from the publisher.) You can sign up for the free Bible study to watch the videos for free and get free downloads. Just click here-- https://www.faithgateway.com/taste-an... Now about the book -- The title, "Taste and See" gives I have read the 1st three chapters of this book, and I want to share with you the great opportunity available if you are interested in this book! There is a free online Bible study starting 1-21-19, which is the time this book officially releases. (I got 3 chapters early from the publisher.) You can sign up for the free Bible study to watch the videos for free and get free downloads. Just click here-- https://www.faithgateway.com/taste-an... Now about the book -- The title, "Taste and See" gives you the clue -- Seeing food and tasting food! The Bible is full of references to food, miracles with food, and parables about food. The first 3 chapters of "Taste and See" cover fish and fruit and the joy of eating! The author packs this book with unusual information about the different foods, and their significance in the Bible. I never paid attention to all the references to food in the Bible before! Just in the first few chapters, I learned so much about fishing in the Sea of Galilee and what it takes to be a fisherman there. I learned about figs, and why figs are so important in the Israelites history. Like did you know that fig trees produce fruit almost all year round? Or did you know that the tree Zacheus climbed was a Sycamore-FIG tree? I never knew that. Some other foods in the book are bread, and olives. I can't wait to read the rest of this book! Oh and I almost forgot to tell you -- Each chapter has really interesting recipes! I am hoping to make the chocolate covered pomegranates. They sound delicious! I am having so much fun reading this book! #TasteAndSeeBook

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