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With echoes of Toni Morrison’s Beloved, Yejidé’s novel explores a forgotten quadrant of Washington, DC, and the ghosts that haunt it. Nephthys Kinwell is a taxi driver of sorts in Washington, DC, ferrying ill-fated passengers in a haunted car: a 1967 Plymouth Belvedere with a ghost in the trunk. Endless rides and alcohol help her manage her grief over the death of her twin With echoes of Toni Morrison’s Beloved, Yejidé’s novel explores a forgotten quadrant of Washington, DC, and the ghosts that haunt it. Nephthys Kinwell is a taxi driver of sorts in Washington, DC, ferrying ill-fated passengers in a haunted car: a 1967 Plymouth Belvedere with a ghost in the trunk. Endless rides and alcohol help her manage her grief over the death of her twin brother, Osiris, who was murdered and dumped in the Anacostia River. Unknown to Nephthys when the novel opens in 1977, her estranged great-nephew, ten-year-old Dash, is finding himself drawn to the banks of that very same river. It is there that Dash--reeling from having witnessed an act of molestation at his school, but still questioning what and who he saw--has charmed conversations with a mysterious figure he calls the "River Man," who somehow appears each time he goes there. When Dash arrives unexpectedly at Nephthys's door one day bearing a cryptic note about his unusual conversations with the River Man, Nephthys must face both the family she abandoned and what frightens her most when she looks in the mirror. Creatures of Passage beautifully threads together the stories of Nephthys, Dash, and others both living and dead. Morowa Yejidé's deeply captivating novel shows us an unseen Washington filled with otherworldly landscapes, flawed super-humans, and reluctant ghosts, and brings together a community intent on saving one young boy in order to reclaim themselves.


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With echoes of Toni Morrison’s Beloved, Yejidé’s novel explores a forgotten quadrant of Washington, DC, and the ghosts that haunt it. Nephthys Kinwell is a taxi driver of sorts in Washington, DC, ferrying ill-fated passengers in a haunted car: a 1967 Plymouth Belvedere with a ghost in the trunk. Endless rides and alcohol help her manage her grief over the death of her twin With echoes of Toni Morrison’s Beloved, Yejidé’s novel explores a forgotten quadrant of Washington, DC, and the ghosts that haunt it. Nephthys Kinwell is a taxi driver of sorts in Washington, DC, ferrying ill-fated passengers in a haunted car: a 1967 Plymouth Belvedere with a ghost in the trunk. Endless rides and alcohol help her manage her grief over the death of her twin brother, Osiris, who was murdered and dumped in the Anacostia River. Unknown to Nephthys when the novel opens in 1977, her estranged great-nephew, ten-year-old Dash, is finding himself drawn to the banks of that very same river. It is there that Dash--reeling from having witnessed an act of molestation at his school, but still questioning what and who he saw--has charmed conversations with a mysterious figure he calls the "River Man," who somehow appears each time he goes there. When Dash arrives unexpectedly at Nephthys's door one day bearing a cryptic note about his unusual conversations with the River Man, Nephthys must face both the family she abandoned and what frightens her most when she looks in the mirror. Creatures of Passage beautifully threads together the stories of Nephthys, Dash, and others both living and dead. Morowa Yejidé's deeply captivating novel shows us an unseen Washington filled with otherworldly landscapes, flawed super-humans, and reluctant ghosts, and brings together a community intent on saving one young boy in order to reclaim themselves.

30 review for Creatures of Passage

  1. 4 out of 5

    Marjorie

    I have mixed feelings about this one. I appreciated the moments of beauty that I found in this book but at times I became completely lost about what it was saying. I knew going in that it was a ghost story with elements of fantasy but I had no idea how extensive that fantasy would be. Half way through, I really began to struggle to continue. I think there will be an audience for this book but I can’t recommend it as a book I truly enjoyed.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Carol

    This book is skillfully written but sometimes takes off on whirlwind journeys that make it difficult to understand exactly what the author is actually trying to express. I have never before read anything by this author, but I do find that she is very good at bringing together a story that is both frightening as well as almost playful. The sum total is an unforgettable blurring of reality and genres. From the haunted Plymouth automobile to the mysteries in the fog in this alternate America and hi This book is skillfully written but sometimes takes off on whirlwind journeys that make it difficult to understand exactly what the author is actually trying to express. I have never before read anything by this author, but I do find that she is very good at bringing together a story that is both frightening as well as almost playful. The sum total is an unforgettable blurring of reality and genres. From the haunted Plymouth automobile to the mysteries in the fog in this alternate America and hidden Washington, DC filled with otherworldly landscapes… flawed super-humans…and reluctant ghosts, you will find that no matter what your feelings are about the content… you will know that you have never read anything quiet like it. That having been said...I believe it will take an audience with more Si-Fi tastes rather than supernatural preferences to really give it the appreciation that it deserves. I received a complimentary copy of this book from Akashic Books in exchange for an honest opinion. The views expressed by this reviewer are entirely my own.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    January 16, 2021 Readers note: I was happy to have received this book and looked forward to reading it, especially since it was set in the city of my birth. I received it the morning of January 6, 2021, just before all hell broke loose in and around the US Capitol. One of the many aftermaths of that insurrection is that I am not up to reading about the city, even one laced with Magical Realism, myth, and ghostly things. I've picked it up twice, and set it dow again, because I can't really concen January 16, 2021 Readers note: I was happy to have received this book and looked forward to reading it, especially since it was set in the city of my birth. I received it the morning of January 6, 2021, just before all hell broke loose in and around the US Capitol. One of the many aftermaths of that insurrection is that I am not up to reading about the city, even one laced with Magical Realism, myth, and ghostly things. I've picked it up twice, and set it dow again, because I can't really concentrate right now. I promise to pick it up again when my mind has settled and our world is hopefully a little more stable.

  4. 5 out of 5

    2TReads

    With #creaturesofpassage comes a story that explores what can be born and borne of grief, the power it has to both cripple and galvanize us, how the acceptance can lead to a path that is healing and transformative. Yejidé's writing is heavy, heady, nuanced with feeling and meaning. She seamlessly interweaves the after with the now, connecting life and death via the spirit world, which she writes with such richness that the reader is immersed. I love books that mesh the spirituality of Black existe With #creaturesofpassage comes a story that explores what can be born and borne of grief, the power it has to both cripple and galvanize us, how the acceptance can lead to a path that is healing and transformative. Yejidé's writing is heavy, heady, nuanced with feeling and meaning. She seamlessly interweaves the after with the now, connecting life and death via the spirit world, which she writes with such richness that the reader is immersed. I love books that mesh the spirituality of Black existence into their prose, the meaning and bonds of family, the pain that comes with bottled up emotions and situations not spoken about, and the healing and triumph that begins when we open ourselves to the magic and currents of being. The dualities of our presence, the ties that physically, emotionally, and spiritually run through communities and homes, the loss of innocence, the hardening of hearts in order to avoid shattering realities course through this story, but with a gentleness that deflects harm. Yejidé has written characters that burrow into your mind and soul because they all carry hurt and loss within, they all have cares. She has entwined reality with the mystical, making it easy to believe that each is never far from the other and all we have to do is believe. This was such a heart read, right away the characters reach out and grab you by the heart and don't let go, even after the end.

  5. 4 out of 5

    William

    The novel is set in the South East quadrant of the city of Washington D.C. The part of the city not on the nightly news and a figuratively if not literally, world apart, from the federal enclave that most tourists know. I've lived either in the city proper or just over it's boundaries for over 40 years now so the locations mentioned in the novel are very familiar to me. It's always a pleasure to know that someone has taken to time to see and write about things that resonate with you. The novel i The novel is set in the South East quadrant of the city of Washington D.C. The part of the city not on the nightly news and a figuratively if not literally, world apart, from the federal enclave that most tourists know. I've lived either in the city proper or just over it's boundaries for over 40 years now so the locations mentioned in the novel are very familiar to me. It's always a pleasure to know that someone has taken to time to see and write about things that resonate with you. The novel is of the speculative/sci-fi genre but even so many character could off the pages and into our barber shops, churches, and street corners. The vivid urban portraits sparkle and throb with life. But the book concerns itself with the passages between life and death and the ghosts and people who inhabit those in-between spaces. The main protagonist operates a sort of jitney service that fills the transportation needs of the bereft and dispossessed. Her own family's story is also central to the plot. I feel that I may not be the best reviewer because sci-fi is not my favorite genre and ghost stories in particular give me pause (ghosts, spirits, haints, and shapeshifters abound). And of course in a family there are children. I am very sensitive and try to avoid stories of child endangerment. Most but not all escape the clutches of adult deprivation and these scenes distracted from my reading pleasure. But if strong Black sci-fi (folkloric?) is your preferred reading, I would strongly recommend it. P.S. I raised my star rating from 3 to 4 because three weeks later I'm still thinking and pondering the novel.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Genevieve Paquette

    This was a weird one for me. I've had it in my Audible wishlist for months and was really, really looking forward to it. So I was excited to finally listen to it. And then. I hated the writing. It was an ok book with a very interesting premise, but it got bogged down in the morass of florid, soppy, try-hard-philosophical prose, and the need to provide social and political commentary (in the most heavy-handed way possible). Here's the thing. People enjoy "lush prose." I don't get it, but... people l This was a weird one for me. I've had it in my Audible wishlist for months and was really, really looking forward to it. So I was excited to finally listen to it. And then. I hated the writing. It was an ok book with a very interesting premise, but it got bogged down in the morass of florid, soppy, try-hard-philosophical prose, and the need to provide social and political commentary (in the most heavy-handed way possible). Here's the thing. People enjoy "lush prose." I don't get it, but... people like it. If that's your thing, you'll love this. It was practically purple. It had that sort of whimsical, almost subversive-fairytale vibe that so many people enjoy (but I find tedious and overbearing). It was a lot. Lots of kings and kingdoms and sort of fairytale language describing states and presidents, for instance. So again, if you're into that style, you'll enjoy it a heck of a lot more than I did. Ok, so. I've had a bit of time to ruminate, I think I was actually really disappointed by this, and not just because the writing style wasn't to my taste. The story was thin. Really thin. And the conclusion was staggeringly anticlimactic. It's like it didn't know what it wanted to be, so it tried to be everything and didn't manage to really be anything. The characters weren't developed enough for it to be a character piece. The family dynamic/relationship wasn't developed enough for it to be one of those ever popular general fictions about a messed up family coming to terms with itself (although I think this was what it was supposed to be), the supernatural stuff was interesting but it felt unnecessary and tacked on strictly to make the story more interesting (or maybe to hammer home the idea that the main characters were "other" even in their own community). It would have ended up the same whether or not there were ghosts, or one of the characters could half-predict death. Then there's the mystery part, which is why I was do eager to read the book. It was very,very basic. Serial child rapist picks on the wrong kid, gets killed, life goes on, nothing really changes (except it brings the protagonist's family back together). The mystery is not actually a mystery, it's a plot device. A MacGuffin, almost. It serves as a catalyst for the resolution of the family drama part of the story. We know who the killer is at maybe the first third of the book. We quickly learn his motivations, and what his endgame is. There is exactly no sense of urgency or tension and revealing who the villain is so early in the game was kind of... deflating? Two nitpicks: first, the book uses the "boys who are sexually abused grow up to be sexusl abusers" trope, which is something I find problematic, and also lazy. I can see how the author might have been trying to spotlight generational abuse or something, maybe, but I think the same points could have been made without resorting to that harmful stereotype. Second, and this is a genuine nitpick, the protagonist was a twin. A female twin with a male twin brother. So, fraternal twins. But a huge deal was made of the fact that they were conjoined at birth. At the index finger, but, still, conjoined. That's not possible. I mean, I know, I know, it's a magical realism story, there are ghosts and psychic powers but THIS is what you're unable to suspend your disbelief for? I don't know, it just bothered me.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Gabriel Soll

    This book was absolutely amazing. I want this book to be nominated and win all of the awards...at very least I want to be part of the choir of people who sing its praises with hope of convincing others to read this. After finishing, I have so many thoughts it is hard to organize them in a manner conducive of sharing. In scrolling these comments, it astounds me how many miss the mark. First, this is a tale of magical realism. If you read this expecting any sort of fantasy or ghost story, you will This book was absolutely amazing. I want this book to be nominated and win all of the awards...at very least I want to be part of the choir of people who sing its praises with hope of convincing others to read this. After finishing, I have so many thoughts it is hard to organize them in a manner conducive of sharing. In scrolling these comments, it astounds me how many miss the mark. First, this is a tale of magical realism. If you read this expecting any sort of fantasy or ghost story, you will be in the wrong place. And she gets the magical realism soooooo right. All of the pieces and parts fit together to paint a world, a community, a neighborhood in my beloved city in a time in which it was among its worst and most forgotten. I was born in the same year in which this book takes place and throughout my suburban white childhood, Anacostia was almost mythic. The irony of it is that now my office is there and I ride my bike past many of the monuments and landmarks in this book (but off the tourist radar, mostly). What the magic of this tale did was to make the good, bad, and (truthfully) ugly sides come to vivid life for me...to illuminate how people saw/could see each other there...and how they made sense of it all. Second, this book is layered, character driven, and structured unlike anything I've seen. If you are looking for a novel to take you from point A to point B...this isn't it. If you want a novel to explain how the points are connected, how the people going between them have shared cultural, familial, and personal interest and how all of that can intersect on a plot...that's more like it. The very structure plays into the magic above to show how people in that then-blighted community understand their inter-connections no matter how horrific the surrounding circumstances. Third, this book is dark. This book covers an area and a period in its history of crime, hatred, drugs...and yet finds the hope at almost every turn. There is comfort in the words people speak to each other. Connections without judgments when words simply wont cut it. So much humanity (even the worst of it) on display. Yejide brings out an understanding of how the monsters are made and juxtaposes their insanity with the crazy they impart on others. At times it hurt to read...and i assure you I had to read the conclusion twice (the first time just to find out what she was going to do to the characters I had taken such an interest in...the second to actually absorb it). The final point I will make is about Ms. Yejide's use of language. Others complained here of histrionics and florid prose...I couldn't disagree with these descriptions more. I found her writing to be illuminating...finding way to show (and yet not tell) not only the surroundings or people, but the effects of those physical things. Her use of repetition of certain phrases and descriptions, placed differently to connote different (and pointedly the same, sometimes) things throughout was spot on. This work took my breath away. When this pandemic ends I hope the author will do another signing event somewhere just so I can meet her long enough to thank her in person. I fear there is so much more than this can possibly cover...this book will not be for everyone but if you have an inkling of what you are getting into, you will be rewarded handsomely.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Tommi Powell

    Creatures of Passage (Akashic Books, available 3/16/2021) by Morowa Yejidé is unlike any book I’ve encountered before. There are echoes of other authors and other works; early praise draws a comparison to Toni Morrison. (I heard Morrison, particularly in Rosetta’s sections, and I also found the entire novel a bit Faulknerian.) But those echoes are nods to what came before, evidence of a solid foundation upon which an author is nurtured, a foundation of traditional canonical literature, but more Creatures of Passage (Akashic Books, available 3/16/2021) by Morowa Yejidé is unlike any book I’ve encountered before. There are echoes of other authors and other works; early praise draws a comparison to Toni Morrison. (I heard Morrison, particularly in Rosetta’s sections, and I also found the entire novel a bit Faulknerian.) But those echoes are nods to what came before, evidence of a solid foundation upon which an author is nurtured, a foundation of traditional canonical literature, but more importantly, a foundation that includes the voices that were largely silenced by an industry that did not wish to hear them. Creatures of Passage is inherently unique in both construct and execution. It is a lyrical magical realism work with mystical fog, twins born conjoined at the knuckle, mythological elements, talking animals, and Frankenstein’s monster of vegetables. It’s a ghost story with a dead white girl in the trunk of car, a young Vietnamese girl killed in the war, and a black man murdered because a white woman said he touched her. It is a crime drama with murder, pedophilia, sexual assault, drug dealers and druggies, and an incident involving the police and a mentally ill young black man. It is beautiful and brutal, terrific and terrifying, all in the same breath. The novel is set in 1977 in Anacostia – an area of DC called the “capital’s wild child east of the river that bore its name.” In the eastern most quadrant, where “anything was possible,” Nepthys Kinwell tries her damnedest to drown her losses and guilt in booze, avoid her niece, and ferry those who need her most to their desired destinations. Nephthys is a special type of taxicab driver, her 1967 Plymouth Belvedere travels with the fog and comes when summoned, the dead white girl in the trunk a constant but harmless passenger. When Nepthys’s niece’s son, Dash, shows up at her door with a note from school, everything changes. It’s a novel of things that are lost and things that are found -things that are freely given and things that are stolen. And sometimes what is lost, found, given and stolen are the people who end up in the back seat of that Belvedere, eating candy from a sack handed to them by a woman who lives up to her goddess namesake, just as her brother, Osiris, lives up to his. (I was provided an advanced copy of this book in exchange for my honest review.)

  9. 5 out of 5

    Debra

    Wow. Ms. Yejide has created a complete world just a breath apart from ours. She's made me a fan of an unlikely hero, Nephthys Kinwell, a reluctant survivor of racism, violence, addiction, and loss (including loss of her twin brother, Osiris; yes; Nephthys and Osiris). Creatures of Passage is a hard book to read, not because of the intricacies of Ms. Yejide's mythological Anacostia, where Nephthys and her community grapple with what it means ("or does not mean") to live--and die--with others in th Wow. Ms. Yejide has created a complete world just a breath apart from ours. She's made me a fan of an unlikely hero, Nephthys Kinwell, a reluctant survivor of racism, violence, addiction, and loss (including loss of her twin brother, Osiris; yes; Nephthys and Osiris). Creatures of Passage is a hard book to read, not because of the intricacies of Ms. Yejide's mythological Anacostia, where Nephthys and her community grapple with what it means ("or does not mean") to live--and die--with others in this scarred and beautiful place, a place that stretches in time and beyond death. It's the hard truth of it that is hard. (And that's not even counting a large part of the plot that deals with sexual abuse of children. I almost stopped reading because I didn't want to experience, even from a distance as a reader, the trauma the characters were experiencing; it was almost too much.) Living and working in Prince George's County now, and growing up in the DC area in the 70s, I recognized a lot of Ms. Yejide's landscape, which probably helped keep me in the story. There were some stylistic elements of the writing I did not love, but Nephthys will stay with me for a while. (view spoiler)[Okay, not exactly a spoiler, but: For me, the "hard" reading led to a satisfying conclusion. (hide spoiler)]

  10. 5 out of 5

    Eule Luftschloss

    dnf at the nice page count of 111 trigger warning (view spoiler)[ grief, trauma, nightmares, child rape, child murder , racism, n-word (hide spoiler)] This is a characterdriven book, and I struggle to give you a plot summary. There is a woman whose grand-nephew speaks to a ghost, and she is wondering whether to do something about it, but is not sure as she is distanced from her niece. Said niece dreams of the future, mostly about death. It drifts from this person to that person in a wonderful prose dnf at the nice page count of 111 trigger warning (view spoiler)[ grief, trauma, nightmares, child rape, child murder , racism, n-word (hide spoiler)] This is a characterdriven book, and I struggle to give you a plot summary. There is a woman whose grand-nephew speaks to a ghost, and she is wondering whether to do something about it, but is not sure as she is distanced from her niece. Said niece dreams of the future, mostly about death. It drifts from this person to that person in a wonderful prose, and I would have liked to keep on reading, were it not for Mercy's section. He's a groundskeeper at a school and a church, and everybody sees him as this harmless, helpful person. He is a serial rapist, and his recollection of his fondest memories with children go ond and on and on. I'm sorry, I can't. It's handled in a great way and not exploitive, but I've befriended too many people who were like these children and nobody helped or believed them aside from a few friends who were equally as powerless. Listen, I am not having a great time with arcs at the moment, but I've also have had much luck with them in the past. Still think it's worth it. But this time, again, no more from me. The arc was provided by the publisher.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Georgie

    Creatures of Passage is a gorgeously written book. The prose has a gravity to it, a sense of weight and force. The style is very 'old time myth,' with states as kingdoms and a plasticity to time and recurring triplicates. It feels familiar and unique at the same time. The atmosphere is palpable and the sense of place both solid and fantastical. The characters had a similar gravity to them, especially Nepthys, Osiris, and Mercy. Rosetta's sections were particularly painful to read, for how badly s Creatures of Passage is a gorgeously written book. The prose has a gravity to it, a sense of weight and force. The style is very 'old time myth,' with states as kingdoms and a plasticity to time and recurring triplicates. It feels familiar and unique at the same time. The atmosphere is palpable and the sense of place both solid and fantastical. The characters had a similar gravity to them, especially Nepthys, Osiris, and Mercy. Rosetta's sections were particularly painful to read, for how badly she'd been failed. Dash's POV was also well done, with his knowing something bad happened but unable to wrap his mind around entirely around the what or the why. In the end, though, I think the gravity, rather than pulling me in, instead distanced me from the book. I could recognize the technical excellence, but I couldn't connect to the characters lost in fog and myth. Osiris' passage through the afterlife was full of wild emotion- anger in all its many forms, and grief, and righteousness- but I didn't feel any of them. They were just words on a page. I wanted to be along for the ride, like one of Nepthys' wandering hearts, but that connection just didn't happen. Still, I think this book deserves a decent sized audience. There's a lot of skill in it, and I hope Yejidé continues writing.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Geonn Cannon

    I try to keep an eye on new/upcoming releases, to the point where the last book I read doesn't come out until September, but somehow this one completely slipped my attention. I don't even remember seeing it on any lists, and I feel like I would've noticed this cover. But I'm glad I managed to find it, because this book is amazing. A unique fantasy novel with a crew of great characters. Even the setting feels like a middle ground. Set in 1977, it's not quite historical fiction, not quite modern-d I try to keep an eye on new/upcoming releases, to the point where the last book I read doesn't come out until September, but somehow this one completely slipped my attention. I don't even remember seeing it on any lists, and I feel like I would've noticed this cover. But I'm glad I managed to find it, because this book is amazing. A unique fantasy novel with a crew of great characters. Even the setting feels like a middle ground. Set in 1977, it's not quite historical fiction, not quite modern-day. The characters named Nephthys and Osiris who aren't gods (but maybe aren't entirely mortal, either). This is an amazing book and Morowa Yejidé has immediately earned a place on my must-read list.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth Hunter

    This is a story about the pain, sorrow, and loss suffered by an entire community and by very specific individuals within it, whose threads are knotted together in some of the poorest neighborhoods of Washington, DC. There are elements of what may be alternate history, or just a different perspective on our country than most of us are used to reading. There is magic realism--the juxtaposition of signs omens bones and the cabbages the size of small moons and prophetic dreams of death--amid the hyp This is a story about the pain, sorrow, and loss suffered by an entire community and by very specific individuals within it, whose threads are knotted together in some of the poorest neighborhoods of Washington, DC. There are elements of what may be alternate history, or just a different perspective on our country than most of us are used to reading. There is magic realism--the juxtaposition of signs omens bones and the cabbages the size of small moons and prophetic dreams of death--amid the hyper-realism of the toll that poverty takes from the richness of life. It's painful at times and there are passages within the mind of an abuser that I found particularly disturbing, but there is also a note of sweetness running through the book, and a backbone of iron as those who've accepted so much refuse the reality preying upon their young. The writing is so lyrical that the grittiness of what it portrays is a constant surprise. A brilliant achievement.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Aaron (Typographical Era)

    “And in the loneliness of his thoughts, Mercy knew—as all the neglected do—that indifference was an insidious poison, a slow drip into the mind and the heart. And each act of cruelty to himself or someone else was a hopeless helpless cry to the Void that the indifference and the lightlessness made: I am. I exist.” Damn this book was good, but damn does it quickly go to dark places that even its fantastical use of magical realism can’t conceal, gloss over, or explain away. It loses a star because a “And in the loneliness of his thoughts, Mercy knew—as all the neglected do—that indifference was an insidious poison, a slow drip into the mind and the heart. And each act of cruelty to himself or someone else was a hopeless helpless cry to the Void that the indifference and the lightlessness made: I am. I exist.” Damn this book was good, but damn does it quickly go to dark places that even its fantastical use of magical realism can’t conceal, gloss over, or explain away. It loses a star because after a long setup it rushes its way too quickly through the conclusion and leaves more than a few questions unanswered.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Nancy

    I really enjoyed reading this book even though (because?) magical realism is not my genre. The writing was beautiful, lyrical. No, I didn’t understand every word, even felt a little lost at times, but maybe that was part of the magic. The author created another world in D.C. in 1977, one that was historically and geographically accurate, but was, well, other-worldly. Ghosts, seers, voodoo were just some of the things that contributed to the escape from reality. This is so far out of my wheelhous I really enjoyed reading this book even though (because?) magical realism is not my genre. The writing was beautiful, lyrical. No, I didn’t understand every word, even felt a little lost at times, but maybe that was part of the magic. The author created another world in D.C. in 1977, one that was historically and geographically accurate, but was, well, other-worldly. Ghosts, seers, voodoo were just some of the things that contributed to the escape from reality. This is so far out of my wheelhouse that I don’t even know how to describe it. But I know I liked it!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Yee Swope

    This is so not my usual genre, but I got sucked in by the lyrical writing and then invested in the characters, even as they looped away for a time and then cycled back into the narrative. Morowa writes place with a gravity of years of experiential knowledge of the Anacostia region of DC, overlaid with a mystic sense of the beyond drawn from multiple mythological roots spanning from Gullah culture to Egypt.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Fiona

    This book definitely went some places that I was not prepared for it to go in terms of subject matter and had I known beforehand the extent to which it would explore CSA I most likely would have skipped it. That being said, the prose was beautiful and propelling and the repetition and imagery the author used made the story feel dreamlike.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Amma

    whew! this book is a lot... i admit that i struggled through much of the book because it seemed to focus on Black pain but ultimately it is a lesson about community, the strength we lose, give and empower within families and the journey of finding one's self. there is so much to unpack. i may add more to this review later. whew! this book is a lot... i admit that i struggled through much of the book because it seemed to focus on Black pain but ultimately it is a lesson about community, the strength we lose, give and empower within families and the journey of finding one's self. there is so much to unpack. i may add more to this review later.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Beth

    LibraryThing Early Review There are elements of this novel which are well written but, overall, it is artificially melodramatic. The histrionics are hokey and distracting, making the book difficult to read. I gave this novel three stars for concept and character development.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Ruth Garcia-Corrales

    Morowa Yejide provides a ghost story that drives you to several characters who seem all independent but they all relate through the story. Fun to read eventhough it brings again awareness to child abuse.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Dea Spears

    I absolutely love this book! Write more books, please! I suggest you join NovelStar’s writing competition this April. Please check the link below : https://www.facebook.com/104455574751... I absolutely love this book! Write more books, please! I suggest you join NovelStar’s writing competition this April. Please check the link below : https://www.facebook.com/104455574751...

  22. 5 out of 5

    Kate

    Often extraordinarily beautiful, sometimes very difficult to read -- there are some scenes describing how an abuser lured children that I almost had to put down. It feels like a first novel (which it is), a strong voice emerging. I'm looking forward to more from Yejide. Often extraordinarily beautiful, sometimes very difficult to read -- there are some scenes describing how an abuser lured children that I almost had to put down. It feels like a first novel (which it is), a strong voice emerging. I'm looking forward to more from Yejide.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Lynn

    Was Never Engaged A mythological journey led by Osiris to the underworld and a story of African Americans in American history never quite jelled for me. I couldn’t feel it. I wanted to.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jean

    I couldn't finish this book. I really appreciated the rich writing and descriptions. Liked the metaphor of the writing, but the subject matter was too much for me. I was doing fine until the chapter from Mercy's POV and I had to stop. It is intense and not for all audiences. I couldn't finish this book. I really appreciated the rich writing and descriptions. Liked the metaphor of the writing, but the subject matter was too much for me. I was doing fine until the chapter from Mercy's POV and I had to stop. It is intense and not for all audiences.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Julia Sanchez

    This is a very well written story, and the author is obviously very talented, If you have some great stories like this one, you can publish it on Novel Star, just submit your story to [email protected] or [email protected]

  26. 4 out of 5

    Martha Anne Toll

    Here's my review for the Washington Post https://www.washingtonpost.com/entert... Here's my review for the Washington Post https://www.washingtonpost.com/entert...

  27. 4 out of 5

    ☕️Kimberly

    DNF. May try again later.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Bolyejar

    Absolutely adore this book. Can't wait to read it again. Absolutely adore this book. Can't wait to read it again.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    Happy to support a DC author. Overall I am not sure what the author was trying to say, but it was an interesting concept.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Kate

    Lyrical. A tribute to Anacostia and the perseverance of the people who live there. But meanders a little too much.

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