counter create hit The Corpus: The Hippocratic Writings (Classics of Medicine) - Download Free eBook
Hot Best Seller

The Corpus: The Hippocratic Writings (Classics of Medicine)

Availability: Ready to download

The Corpus of Hippocrates is a collection of early medical works written and inspired by the ancient Greek physician and his students. Containing lectures, research, and philosophical essays on medicine, the Corpus is one of the earliest medical texts in human history. With actual case studies from the ancient world, it's a fascinating peek into the history of medicine tha The Corpus of Hippocrates is a collection of early medical works written and inspired by the ancient Greek physician and his students. Containing lectures, research, and philosophical essays on medicine, the Corpus is one of the earliest medical texts in human history. With actual case studies from the ancient world, it's a fascinating peek into the history of medicine that aspiring doctors read to this day. Most prominent among its seventy essays is The Hippocratic Oath, a manifesto of medical ethics. Its preamble is still traditionally sworn by physicians before entering practice. It begins: ""I swear by Apollo Physician ... and all the gods and goddesses, making them my witnesses, that I will fulfill according to my ability and judgment this oath and this covenant.""


Compare

The Corpus of Hippocrates is a collection of early medical works written and inspired by the ancient Greek physician and his students. Containing lectures, research, and philosophical essays on medicine, the Corpus is one of the earliest medical texts in human history. With actual case studies from the ancient world, it's a fascinating peek into the history of medicine tha The Corpus of Hippocrates is a collection of early medical works written and inspired by the ancient Greek physician and his students. Containing lectures, research, and philosophical essays on medicine, the Corpus is one of the earliest medical texts in human history. With actual case studies from the ancient world, it's a fascinating peek into the history of medicine that aspiring doctors read to this day. Most prominent among its seventy essays is The Hippocratic Oath, a manifesto of medical ethics. Its preamble is still traditionally sworn by physicians before entering practice. It begins: ""I swear by Apollo Physician ... and all the gods and goddesses, making them my witnesses, that I will fulfill according to my ability and judgment this oath and this covenant.""

30 review for The Corpus: The Hippocratic Writings (Classics of Medicine)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Barry

    No way am I going to review a medical text written by the father of modern medicine. My hubris does not stretch so far.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Matt

    Life is short, and art long; pg. 47, Sec. 1, Aphorisms Hippocrates, the Greek doctor from Kos who practiced in the 5th and 4th centuries B.C. is best known for the oath that takes his name. During a time when gods dispensed calamities upon Western man, he strove to refine and expand medicine into a professional art. The Corpus, of questionable authorship, consists of various essays on medicine. Starting with the Oath of Hippocrates, the essays attempt to catalogue the science, practices and obser Life is short, and art long; pg. 47, Sec. 1, Aphorisms Hippocrates, the Greek doctor from Kos who practiced in the 5th and 4th centuries B.C. is best known for the oath that takes his name. During a time when gods dispensed calamities upon Western man, he strove to refine and expand medicine into a professional art. The Corpus, of questionable authorship, consists of various essays on medicine. Starting with the Oath of Hippocrates, the essays attempt to catalogue the science, practices and observations for future practitioners. Possibly with a medical background, the reader may appreciate the theories and conclusions Hippocrates draws from the symptoms he observes. For the layperson, most of the material will pass through undigested. It’s a clinical work. The Corpus, among other topics, covers symptoms seen in terms of imbalance in the four humours (blood, black bile, yellow bile and phlegm), bandaging techniques and contains over two dozen case studies of those afflicted in epidemics. Hippocrates did not believe that disease could be explained away as divine retribution. Though I could appreciate Hippocrates refusal to align with his contemporaries who “use divinity as a pretext and screen of their own inability to their own inability to afford any assistance” pg. 100, On the Sacred Disease, I could only appreciate The Corpus as a historical piece. For its’ disciplined adherence to science and the transmittal of medical knowledge in a time when superstition reigned, it is most likely unparalleled. For its’ significance to the lay reader today, it is skim worthy.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Blake Kruger

  4. 5 out of 5

    Erinn

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jeffrey

  6. 5 out of 5

    Keri LaPensee

  7. 4 out of 5

    Robert Kaufman

  8. 5 out of 5

    Kafkasfriend

  9. 5 out of 5

    Sean

  10. 5 out of 5

    Arina Hemmington

  11. 4 out of 5

    Cate Juin

  12. 5 out of 5

    Kaley

  13. 4 out of 5

    Ursu Traian

  14. 5 out of 5

    Mrigendra Pratap Singh

  15. 5 out of 5

    Amber

  16. 4 out of 5

    Chris

  17. 4 out of 5

    Mary

  18. 5 out of 5

    Coincidentia oppositorum

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jovany Agathe

  20. 5 out of 5

    Holly Beth

  21. 5 out of 5

    Craig

  22. 5 out of 5

    Andrei

  23. 5 out of 5

    Dee

  24. 4 out of 5

    Frank Maybusher

  25. 5 out of 5

    Nasch

  26. 5 out of 5

    Brittany Mixon

  27. 4 out of 5

    Chris

  28. 5 out of 5

    Julius

  29. 5 out of 5

    Derek Bumgardner

  30. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.