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A giant of the music industry grants an all-access pass to the world of rock and roll, with mesmerizing stories of thirty-five years spent working with legends from Led Zeppelin, to Stevie Nicks, to Nirvana. Danny Goldberg has been a hugely influential figure in the world of rock and roll. He did PR for Led Zeppelin; he managed the career of Nirvana; he ran Atlantic Records A giant of the music industry grants an all-access pass to the world of rock and roll, with mesmerizing stories of thirty-five years spent working with legends from Led Zeppelin, to Stevie Nicks, to Nirvana. Danny Goldberg has been a hugely influential figure in the world of rock and roll. He did PR for Led Zeppelin; he managed the career of Nirvana; he ran Atlantic Records, Mercury Records, and Warner Bros. Records; he launched Stevie Nicks’s solo career. In Bumping into Geniuses, Goldberg shares his stories about performers who represent a broad and powerful portion of the psychic real estate of the rock and roll kingdom: Patti Smith, Warren Zevon, Bruce Springsteen, KISS, Kurt Cobain and Nirvana, Hole, Stevie Nicks, Bonnie Raitt, Steve Earle, Led Zeppelin, and more. But there’s more to this story than just Goldberg’s varied career. It’s also a look at the industry itself: a business that was neither the romantic vehicle for self-expression that its most naive fans imagined, nor the purely crass money machine depicted by its most cynical critics. It was complex and chaotic—a mixture of art and commerce, idealism and selfishness—and sometimes, rock’s most gifted and influential musicians were able to transcend it all. For anyone interested in the rock and roll industry, or simply the mores and temperaments of the musicians themselves, Bumping into Geniuses is an incredible insider’s tale that only Goldberg could tell.


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A giant of the music industry grants an all-access pass to the world of rock and roll, with mesmerizing stories of thirty-five years spent working with legends from Led Zeppelin, to Stevie Nicks, to Nirvana. Danny Goldberg has been a hugely influential figure in the world of rock and roll. He did PR for Led Zeppelin; he managed the career of Nirvana; he ran Atlantic Records A giant of the music industry grants an all-access pass to the world of rock and roll, with mesmerizing stories of thirty-five years spent working with legends from Led Zeppelin, to Stevie Nicks, to Nirvana. Danny Goldberg has been a hugely influential figure in the world of rock and roll. He did PR for Led Zeppelin; he managed the career of Nirvana; he ran Atlantic Records, Mercury Records, and Warner Bros. Records; he launched Stevie Nicks’s solo career. In Bumping into Geniuses, Goldberg shares his stories about performers who represent a broad and powerful portion of the psychic real estate of the rock and roll kingdom: Patti Smith, Warren Zevon, Bruce Springsteen, KISS, Kurt Cobain and Nirvana, Hole, Stevie Nicks, Bonnie Raitt, Steve Earle, Led Zeppelin, and more. But there’s more to this story than just Goldberg’s varied career. It’s also a look at the industry itself: a business that was neither the romantic vehicle for self-expression that its most naive fans imagined, nor the purely crass money machine depicted by its most cynical critics. It was complex and chaotic—a mixture of art and commerce, idealism and selfishness—and sometimes, rock’s most gifted and influential musicians were able to transcend it all. For anyone interested in the rock and roll industry, or simply the mores and temperaments of the musicians themselves, Bumping into Geniuses is an incredible insider’s tale that only Goldberg could tell.

30 review for Bumping Into Geniuses: My Life Inside the Rock and Roll Business

  1. 4 out of 5

    Hannah Jo Parker

    Really 1 and 1/2 stars. This book frustrated the heck out of me. The author was very involved in some fascinating aspects of the business side of the rock world, but his stories about that experience are completely unsatisfying. Here's a particularly galling example, from page 225: "On April 8, I was back at Atlantic's New York office. I was in a meeting with Stevie Nicks to discuss her next solo album when Rosemary called. She was driving to Exodus to tell Courtney that Kurt had been found dead i Really 1 and 1/2 stars. This book frustrated the heck out of me. The author was very involved in some fascinating aspects of the business side of the rock world, but his stories about that experience are completely unsatisfying. Here's a particularly galling example, from page 225: "On April 8, I was back at Atlantic's New York office. I was in a meeting with Stevie Nicks to discuss her next solo album when Rosemary called. She was driving to Exodus to tell Courtney that Kurt had been found dead in a room above the garage at the house in Seattle, having shot himself in the head. A few days later I was back in Seattle with Rosemary, the night before the funeral. We went to that same house..." See what's missing???!! How about some kind of personal reflection or transition between "having shot himself in the head" and the way too casual "A few days later..."? There are stories about who was at the house and what the author said at the funeral, etc., but what was that like for Rosemary (the author's wife) to tell Courtney that her husband was dead? How did the author feel about hearing this news? I just don't get why that was left out. That's just one example of many I could choose. So disappointing.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Davida

    Yet another fast-reading memoir with not very good writing but some good stories, especially about the famous musicians he worked with, including Kurt and Courtney, Patti Smith, Led Zeppelin, and Stevie Nicks. Reading this book inspired me to listen to Warren Zevon, who I had only listened to a little bit before. Some tidbits I enjoyed: He mentions rock journalist Al Aronowitz, who was present when Dylan gave the Beatles their first joint. I did not know he did that! Scottish blues singer (compare Yet another fast-reading memoir with not very good writing but some good stories, especially about the famous musicians he worked with, including Kurt and Courtney, Patti Smith, Led Zeppelin, and Stevie Nicks. Reading this book inspired me to listen to Warren Zevon, who I had only listened to a little bit before. Some tidbits I enjoyed: He mentions rock journalist Al Aronowitz, who was present when Dylan gave the Beatles their first joint. I did not know he did that! Scottish blues singer (compared to Janis Joplin) Maggie Bell--never heard of her and want to check her out. Steely Dan and Mott the Hoople both took their names from lines in Burroughs's books. Interesting Zevon's quote of Schopenhauer: "When we buy a book we tell ourselves that we are also buying the time to read it." Nice morbid thought. Since Goldberg was in the music biz so long he related tales of the way the charts used to work, radio stations, record companies, etc., in the 60s and 70s. I also found that interesting.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Erin

    This book was disappointing because he regurgitated the same stories and rhetoric as discussed in his earlier book "Dispatches from the Culture Wars." He is also one hell of a name dropper. This book was disappointing because he regurgitated the same stories and rhetoric as discussed in his earlier book "Dispatches from the Culture Wars." He is also one hell of a name dropper.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jeffrey

    A candid view inside the music recording business that reminds me of Faust. What deal would you take if you got to work with Led Zeppelin or Stevie Nicks or Kurt Cobain? What starts out as a young man's interesting brushes with pre-fame Patti Smith and attending Woodstock while trying to make it as a rock journalist starts to go sideways when he turns to doing PR for Led Zeppelin. Interesting bosses, but it's when he had to begin massaging egos to keep his job. His later interactions with Stevie A candid view inside the music recording business that reminds me of Faust. What deal would you take if you got to work with Led Zeppelin or Stevie Nicks or Kurt Cobain? What starts out as a young man's interesting brushes with pre-fame Patti Smith and attending Woodstock while trying to make it as a rock journalist starts to go sideways when he turns to doing PR for Led Zeppelin. Interesting bosses, but it's when he had to begin massaging egos to keep his job. His later interactions with Stevie Nicks, Kurt Cobain and Warren Zevon are prone to giving more information than a fan might want about the personal side of these artists. The later stories of label execs jockeying for position and artists is largely unneeded and unnecessary. The lengths Goldberg went to protect his business by getting Courtney Love to be his client and his recitation of events leading to Cobain's suicide is not pleasant. And when Goldberg recounts pushing to sell extra copies of Warren Zevon's final album before dying of cancer, not to create a nest egg for his family, but as an effort to keep his label open are sad to digest. All in all, it affirms advice I heard as a young man - be careful of working on something you love, lest you learn its dirty secrets.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Clint Stuart

    It's a good story about one of the background people in some of the biggest artist's careers. I really likes the section about Kurt Cobain, but that's probably because of my age. It's a good story about one of the background people in some of the biggest artist's careers. I really likes the section about Kurt Cobain, but that's probably because of my age.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Mike Merrill

    Tedious in spots , some good stories about Led Zep, Kiss etc. Ok...

  7. 5 out of 5

    Paul Lyons

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Engaging book, though perhaps too guarded at times. "Bumping Into Geniuses" is written by someone who clearly has a vested interest in remaining in the music business...so you wont find any bombshells here. That said, music industry veteran/author Danny Goldberg still manages to tell some interesting stories from his 40-plus year career in the music biz. "Bumping Into Geniuses" shines when Goldman discusses the personal care he took with certain artists, and projects. His work with Stevie Nicks i Engaging book, though perhaps too guarded at times. "Bumping Into Geniuses" is written by someone who clearly has a vested interest in remaining in the music business...so you wont find any bombshells here. That said, music industry veteran/author Danny Goldberg still manages to tell some interesting stories from his 40-plus year career in the music biz. "Bumping Into Geniuses" shines when Goldman discusses the personal care he took with certain artists, and projects. His work with Stevie Nicks is a very interesting tale of ups and downs dealing with a variety of personalities conflicts (the "Stand Back" video story is a fun read). I also particularly enjoyed Goldberg's detailed and heartfelt chapter about his work with the late Warren Zevon...and what into making the last album of Zevon's too short life. Most Goldberg's Zeppelin stories (as their PR guy, and later VP of their Swan Song record label) were tales I've heard about it elsewhere, so I was left wanting for more. I also got the sense that he had forgotten about much of it, or was simply holding back for fear of one thing or another. Goldberg is more expressive during his chapter on Kurt Cobain and Nirvana. His stories about Nirvana's rise (and what happened to Kurt Cobain) are very engaging, and revealing. My favorite tale was about the Portland show Nirvana performed not long after Cobain and Courtney Love confrontation with Axl Rose backstage at an MTV awards show...where Cobain interacts with a fan who wants to love both Nirvana AND Guns N' Roses...and informs him and the audience that one can not love the violence and misogyny that Axl Rose represents and also have an understanding of Nirvana's music. It's a story I had never heard before, and inspires one to love Kurt Cobain even more than before. Danny Goldberg's "Bumping Into Geniuses..."arguably would have fared better had it been longer, gone into more depth, and let go of its fairly self-conscious manner in the way it handled its stories and subjects...yet despite its weaknesses, it still was an interesting and engaging read, and provided some fascinating insight to the colorful world of musicians and the music industry...

  8. 5 out of 5

    Maya

    This book took me a little while to get into; in the beginning, a combination of name-drop soup and poor copyediting (in the first section, Atlantic founder Ahmet Ertegun is variously referred to three or four times as "Ahmet" and "Ertegun" even before he's introduced by his full name--even though I knew who he was referring to, it was enough of a stumbling block that I noticed it) makes for heavy sledding. After a while, however, the narrative got a little more cohesive and entertaining. Goldbe This book took me a little while to get into; in the beginning, a combination of name-drop soup and poor copyediting (in the first section, Atlantic founder Ahmet Ertegun is variously referred to three or four times as "Ahmet" and "Ertegun" even before he's introduced by his full name--even though I knew who he was referring to, it was enough of a stumbling block that I noticed it) makes for heavy sledding. After a while, however, the narrative got a little more cohesive and entertaining. Goldberg, by his own admission, is enough of a fan to offer no biting insights, and I did find myself thinking, "Can all these people have been that nice? Truly?" It reads as genuine appreciation rather than superficial fawning, though, which is the book's real saving grace.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jamie Barringer (Ravenmount)

    I really enjoyed this book. It was fun to read about the backsides of so many successful musicians' stories, and enlightening to see how even among these stars success only came after the right combination of luck, hard work and perfect timing, an even the 'greatest' of them had massive failures that make mine pale by comparison. My favorite side of this book was the industry side, which may not appeal so much to everyone, but for folks like me trying to develop a career that supports music and I really enjoyed this book. It was fun to read about the backsides of so many successful musicians' stories, and enlightening to see how even among these stars success only came after the right combination of luck, hard work and perfect timing, an even the 'greatest' of them had massive failures that make mine pale by comparison. My favorite side of this book was the industry side, which may not appeal so much to everyone, but for folks like me trying to develop a career that supports music and musicians in the current music world, it is great to read about how it worked doing this sort of work in earlier eras of modern music. And I really have to check out Walter Zevon now- clearly alltheir efforts never reached me, because I'd never heard of him through any of Goldberg's efforts, but after reading so much about him, I'm a bit curious about his music.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Gato Negro

    Interesting stories written by a long time insider in the music business. I admit I did not read every chapter, only the ones about artists and events that intrigued me. I especially liked the chapter about Stevie Nicks. The Nirvana chapter (perhaps the longest one in the book) was also very well written. No sensationalism here...no bedroom or drug tales...mostly business dealings and behind the scenes relationships between managers, publicists, engineers and artists. I read so much about the mu Interesting stories written by a long time insider in the music business. I admit I did not read every chapter, only the ones about artists and events that intrigued me. I especially liked the chapter about Stevie Nicks. The Nirvana chapter (perhaps the longest one in the book) was also very well written. No sensationalism here...no bedroom or drug tales...mostly business dealings and behind the scenes relationships between managers, publicists, engineers and artists. I read so much about the music industry that it's hard to find new information about artists who've been on the scene for 30 plus years (Led Zep, Patti Smith, Bruce Springsteen, etc.) but I was pleasantly surprised by the chapters I read as they contained new information. A good book.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Steve Yohn

    Ever since reading "Hammer of the Gods: The Led Zeppelin Saga" as a teenager, I 19ve been a bit of a geek about 1Cinside rock and roll 1D books. Goldberg 19s memoir fits that bill perfectly. From his early start writing reviews during the late 1860 19s transition from folk to rock through his time working PR for Led Zeppelin to his close connection to the life and tragic death of Kurt Cobain, this is a fascinating view of the inner workings of what makes the music business tick. One thing I espe Ever since reading "Hammer of the Gods: The Led Zeppelin Saga" as a teenager, I 19ve been a bit of a geek about 1Cinside rock and roll 1D books. Goldberg 19s memoir fits that bill perfectly. From his early start writing reviews during the late 1860 19s transition from folk to rock through his time working PR for Led Zeppelin to his close connection to the life and tragic death of Kurt Cobain, this is a fascinating view of the inner workings of what makes the music business tick. One thing I especially appreciated is that despite his far left leanings (for a short time he was CEO of Air America), he does not beat the reader over the head with his political views. A very good read for any rock and roll fan.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Laren

    This is the story of one man's journey in the music business and how it changed from the sixties through the nineties. From his accidental start as a music critic, he went to PR man for Led Zeppelin, to managing Stevie Nicks, Bonnie Raitt and Nirvana, and ultimately ended up the top dog at 4 different major labels before starting his own indie label. There is no focus on major lessons learned or sordid stories of celebrities so if that's what you are after this book is not for you. But it is qui This is the story of one man's journey in the music business and how it changed from the sixties through the nineties. From his accidental start as a music critic, he went to PR man for Led Zeppelin, to managing Stevie Nicks, Bonnie Raitt and Nirvana, and ultimately ended up the top dog at 4 different major labels before starting his own indie label. There is no focus on major lessons learned or sordid stories of celebrities so if that's what you are after this book is not for you. But it is quite an interesting journey that once again proves a lot of times successful people are making things up as they go along and that's perfectly okay.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Trina

    Bumping into Geniuses was good in that Goldberg worked with many of my favorite musicians: Bruce Springsteen, Warren Zevon, Tom Petty, Jackson Browne, etc. I also liked that there was no glorification of drug use for creativity or of drug users, particularly in the discussions of Kurt Cobain's death. The section on Warren Zevon had me crying a bit, just because his talented wasn't as recognized and he didn't achieve it until he was terminally ill (and afterward) or maybe it's more that he didn't Bumping into Geniuses was good in that Goldberg worked with many of my favorite musicians: Bruce Springsteen, Warren Zevon, Tom Petty, Jackson Browne, etc. I also liked that there was no glorification of drug use for creativity or of drug users, particularly in the discussions of Kurt Cobain's death. The section on Warren Zevon had me crying a bit, just because his talented wasn't as recognized and he didn't achieve it until he was terminally ill (and afterward) or maybe it's more that he didn't start writing his greatest works until he knew that his time was limited.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Randine

    Goldberg knows everyone I've loved in music - he's been there through it all. At about the time Bob came out with 'Blood on the Tracks', Goldberg, Cameron Crowe, Jimmy Page and Robert Plant all ditched a party to go see 'Young Frankenstein' at a local theater. Great little stories like that throughout the book. Managed Nirvana and Hole and has quite a bit in the book about Kurt. When I read Warren Zevons book he mentioned Goldberg all the time so it's good to read Goldberg write about Zevon. Dann Goldberg knows everyone I've loved in music - he's been there through it all. At about the time Bob came out with 'Blood on the Tracks', Goldberg, Cameron Crowe, Jimmy Page and Robert Plant all ditched a party to go see 'Young Frankenstein' at a local theater. Great little stories like that throughout the book. Managed Nirvana and Hole and has quite a bit in the book about Kurt. When I read Warren Zevons book he mentioned Goldberg all the time so it's good to read Goldberg write about Zevon. Danny Goldberg puts humanity into the music business.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Julia

    There's a lot of names dropped - too many for the casual reader. Most of us won't care who started what avant garde pop culture magazine in the late 60s or the different heads of A&R at different labels. However, there's lots of other interesting stuff to read. I particularly enjoyed reading about Goldberg's take on the music industry in general, and working working with Kurt Cobain in particular. I read this book while playing a weekend of classical orchestral music. I was playing Shostakovich a There's a lot of names dropped - too many for the casual reader. Most of us won't care who started what avant garde pop culture magazine in the late 60s or the different heads of A&R at different labels. However, there's lots of other interesting stuff to read. I particularly enjoyed reading about Goldberg's take on the music industry in general, and working working with Kurt Cobain in particular. I read this book while playing a weekend of classical orchestral music. I was playing Shostakovich and Sibelius while reading about Kiss and Led Zepplin. Interesting contrast!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Ric Kimpel

    I enjoyed this book for the stories. Mr. Goldberg certainly seemed to get some lucky breaks considering the amazing musicians that he worked with. Though at times the mumbo jumbo of the Music Industry just solidified my distaste for said industry, it did explain it in a way that you could understand how many artists were really ripped off in the past. For that, at least he was honest about, though at times he seemed to be defending it. All in all a nice read for certain stories about the artists I enjoyed this book for the stories. Mr. Goldberg certainly seemed to get some lucky breaks considering the amazing musicians that he worked with. Though at times the mumbo jumbo of the Music Industry just solidified my distaste for said industry, it did explain it in a way that you could understand how many artists were really ripped off in the past. For that, at least he was honest about, though at times he seemed to be defending it. All in all a nice read for certain stories about the artists that you only get from someone that was there.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Anne

    I was so excited to get this book. Sadly, it is boring and fatuous. Really a shame because I looked up to Danny Goldberg for a long time. Like so many people in the music business he was in the right place in the right time and not brilliant. I guess he even ultimately acknowledges that with the title. Read only for the shout outs and interesting tidbits about artists. Otherwise, this book is BORING

  18. 4 out of 5

    Crystal

    I loved this book! Having done promotions and event planning with local artists, it was really cool to read the industrial life story of someone who's "been there, done that." It was interesting to see that, despite advances in technology, and the "evolution" of the rock scene, a lot of things have not changed. It was awesome to read about the author's metamorphosis from small-scale rock critic to, ultimately, his numerous top-level executive positions in the music industry. I loved this book! Having done promotions and event planning with local artists, it was really cool to read the industrial life story of someone who's "been there, done that." It was interesting to see that, despite advances in technology, and the "evolution" of the rock scene, a lot of things have not changed. It was awesome to read about the author's metamorphosis from small-scale rock critic to, ultimately, his numerous top-level executive positions in the music industry.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Steve Rabideau

    I see the book is getting some harsh reviews, but I actually thought it was decent. I really wasn't expecting much considering I got it on the discount shelf and it was written by a music executive and not an artist. But to be honest his point of view was different and interesting, and it was decent. Not as compelling as a lot of rock bio's, but at under 300 pages, was definitely worth the read if you wanted a little insight into the business end of the music industry. I see the book is getting some harsh reviews, but I actually thought it was decent. I really wasn't expecting much considering I got it on the discount shelf and it was written by a music executive and not an artist. But to be honest his point of view was different and interesting, and it was decent. Not as compelling as a lot of rock bio's, but at under 300 pages, was definitely worth the read if you wanted a little insight into the business end of the music industry.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

    I admit that I am a rock and roll junkie. When I saw this book and saw the line up of people I was hooked. I was touched by Warren Zevon. I want to go back and listen to his back catalog and wished that I could go and be a part of that Zeppelin greatness or the Nirvana madness. Read this just to reflect how far we have come in the music world.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Nick

    The story of a rock journalist turned recording executive turned manager of artists. In parts, fairly dry but still an affecting, interesting read, especially if you are interested in the music business, and any of these artists: Patti Smith, Warren Zevon, Steve Earle, Kiss, Led Zeppelin, Stevie Nicks, Jackson Browne, Kurt Cobain, Courtney Love.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Nicky

    This was a lot of fun for me...I worked with Danny Goldberg a bit back in the late '90s, and I loved his insider view of the industry. He is, and always has been, a gracious and interesting man. If you're at all interested in the history of the music business, this book is great. I read it cover to cover in a couple of hours. This was a lot of fun for me...I worked with Danny Goldberg a bit back in the late '90s, and I loved his insider view of the industry. He is, and always has been, a gracious and interesting man. If you're at all interested in the history of the music business, this book is great. I read it cover to cover in a couple of hours.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Leila

    Finally finished! I sped up once I passed the Zepplin stuff. Tho he doesn't mention the company he owned that I worked for, this is a fascinating look at music management, esp. the rise of Nirvana and Kurt Cobain. Not so much for those interested in the artistry of the music, but great if you enjoy reading about the business (I do), and how to get an artist some attention. Finally finished! I sped up once I passed the Zepplin stuff. Tho he doesn't mention the company he owned that I worked for, this is a fascinating look at music management, esp. the rise of Nirvana and Kurt Cobain. Not so much for those interested in the artistry of the music, but great if you enjoy reading about the business (I do), and how to get an artist some attention.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jim Butler

    If you're looking for a comprehensive history of the rock and roll business, then read The Mansion on the Hill. If you're looking for vignettes about the rock and roll business from a guy who has lived it, then this is an interesting read. Think of Mansion on the Hill as the survey course with Goldberg invited to do a guest lecture. Goldberg bounced around the music business If you're looking for a comprehensive history of the rock and roll business, then read The Mansion on the Hill. If you're looking for vignettes about the rock and roll business from a guy who has lived it, then this is an interesting read. Think of Mansion on the Hill as the survey course with Goldberg invited to do a guest lecture. Goldberg bounced around the music business

  25. 4 out of 5

    Stan

    Read like a suit's view of the music industry to me, even though Goldberg painfully tries to make it sound as if it's not. In fact, he even dedicates the entire first chapter to his "stret cred." The only things I found interesting were the chapters dealing with Led Zeppelin and Nirvana and, even then, there wasn't a whole lot new. Read like a suit's view of the music industry to me, even though Goldberg painfully tries to make it sound as if it's not. In fact, he even dedicates the entire first chapter to his "stret cred." The only things I found interesting were the chapters dealing with Led Zeppelin and Nirvana and, even then, there wasn't a whole lot new.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jeff

    A fascinating story, written with humor and self-deprecation, from a guy who's been in the rock & roll trenches almost from the beginning. There isn't much in the way of "dirt" here, and Goldberg glosses over almost all of his tenure at Artemis, but it's still a very entertaining read. A fascinating story, written with humor and self-deprecation, from a guy who's been in the rock & roll trenches almost from the beginning. There isn't much in the way of "dirt" here, and Goldberg glosses over almost all of his tenure at Artemis, but it's still a very entertaining read.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jo

    Interesting look at the music business over the years. I liked to learn more about Bonnie Raitt & Stevie Nicks. I probably would've liked it better if I cared more about some of the other people/groups he'd represented or worked with over the years. Interesting look at the music business over the years. I liked to learn more about Bonnie Raitt & Stevie Nicks. I probably would've liked it better if I cared more about some of the other people/groups he'd represented or worked with over the years.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Brian

    for someone who was so close to the action - publicist and manger for Led Zeppelin and Nirvana, among others - this reads like it was copied from other books. I never got the sense of being on the inside, or behind the scenes. I suppose it's the PR writer in him - all surface, no meat. for someone who was so close to the action - publicist and manger for Led Zeppelin and Nirvana, among others - this reads like it was copied from other books. I never got the sense of being on the inside, or behind the scenes. I suppose it's the PR writer in him - all surface, no meat.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Erica

    The author talks about his experiences working with and for musical artists Led Zepplin, Stevie Nicks, Bonnie Raitt, Nirvana and Warren Zevon. Although pleasant to read and occasionally offering a point of interest this book was largely forgettable.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Craig

    If you have any interest in Led Zeppelin, Stevie Nicks, Kurt Cobain or Warren Zevon, then this is a breezy read. One compelling part was tracking the impact on Kurt Cobain and Courtney Love after Vanity Fair printed that she had done heroin while pregnant.

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