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A DAILY TELEGRAPH BOOK OF THE YEAR. 'A compelling, authoritative insight into possibly the most controversial death in Britain this century' Observer. 'Masterful ... This book made me proud of my trade as a journalist' Daily Mail. 'This searing excavation of the mysterious death of Dr David Kelly is investigative journalism at its best. It is brave, relentless, dazzlin A DAILY TELEGRAPH BOOK OF THE YEAR. 'A compelling, authoritative insight into possibly the most controversial death in Britain this century' Observer. 'Masterful ... This book made me proud of my trade as a journalist' Daily Mail. 'This searing excavation of the mysterious death of Dr David Kelly is investigative journalism at its best. It is brave, relentless, dazzlingly revealing' Peter Oborne. In March 2003 British forces invaded Iraq after Tony Blair said the country could deploy weapons of mass destruction at 45 minutes' notice. A few months later, government scientist Dr David Kelly was unmasked by Blair's officials as the assumed source of a BBC news report challenging this claim. Within days, Dr Kelly was found dead in a wood near his home. Blair immediately convened the controversial Hutton Inquiry, which concluded Dr Kelly committed suicide. Yet key questions remain: could Dr Kelly really have taken his life in the manner declared? And why did Blair's government derail the coroner's inquest into Dr Kelly's death? In this meticulous account, award-winning journalist Miles Goslett shows why we should be sceptical of the official story of what happened in that desperate summer of 2003.


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A DAILY TELEGRAPH BOOK OF THE YEAR. 'A compelling, authoritative insight into possibly the most controversial death in Britain this century' Observer. 'Masterful ... This book made me proud of my trade as a journalist' Daily Mail. 'This searing excavation of the mysterious death of Dr David Kelly is investigative journalism at its best. It is brave, relentless, dazzlin A DAILY TELEGRAPH BOOK OF THE YEAR. 'A compelling, authoritative insight into possibly the most controversial death in Britain this century' Observer. 'Masterful ... This book made me proud of my trade as a journalist' Daily Mail. 'This searing excavation of the mysterious death of Dr David Kelly is investigative journalism at its best. It is brave, relentless, dazzlingly revealing' Peter Oborne. In March 2003 British forces invaded Iraq after Tony Blair said the country could deploy weapons of mass destruction at 45 minutes' notice. A few months later, government scientist Dr David Kelly was unmasked by Blair's officials as the assumed source of a BBC news report challenging this claim. Within days, Dr Kelly was found dead in a wood near his home. Blair immediately convened the controversial Hutton Inquiry, which concluded Dr Kelly committed suicide. Yet key questions remain: could Dr Kelly really have taken his life in the manner declared? And why did Blair's government derail the coroner's inquest into Dr Kelly's death? In this meticulous account, award-winning journalist Miles Goslett shows why we should be sceptical of the official story of what happened in that desperate summer of 2003.

30 review for An Inconvenient Death: How the Establishment Covered Up the David Kelly Affair

  1. 5 out of 5

    James

    In 2003 I was working as a researcher on the now defunct Jonathan Dimbleby Programme, produced by Granada and broadcast on ITV on Sunday, the programme was a Question Time type format (indeed, Question Time was hosted by Jonathan’s brother David) with a panel of political figures taking questions from a live audience. 2003 was an eventful year, the war in Afghanistan still ongoing after the US invasion of 2001 and the drumbeats of a new war on the horizon, with the administration of George W Bus In 2003 I was working as a researcher on the now defunct Jonathan Dimbleby Programme, produced by Granada and broadcast on ITV on Sunday, the programme was a Question Time type format (indeed, Question Time was hosted by Jonathan’s brother David) with a panel of political figures taking questions from a live audience. 2003 was an eventful year, the war in Afghanistan still ongoing after the US invasion of 2001 and the drumbeats of a new war on the horizon, with the administration of George W Bush set on a controversial invasion of Iraq. In July of that year, Dr David Kelly died, setting the scene for the Hutton Inquiry and all the fall out that came after, an event that was the focus of many an edition of the Jonathan Dimbleby Programme. One thing I well remember is the drama of waiting outside the Royal Courts of Justice on 28th January 2004 for the Hutton Inquiry report to be officially published, collecting multiple copies for the office and carrying them back, the team then proceeding to pour over the 750-page volume. So, perhaps then I can be forgiven for being fascinated with the case ever since. Others are equally fascinated, for Miles Goslett’s An Inconvenient Death is in fact the third book to be published on the death of Dr David Kelly. The first, titled The Strange Death of David Kelly, was written by then-Liberal Democrat MP Norman Baker, and hit the bookshelves in 2007. The second, Dark Actors by the novelist Robert Lewis, was published in 2013. Finally, there’s An Inconvenient Death by Miles Goslett, a respected journalist who’s written for the Evening Standard, Sunday Telegraph and Mail on Sunday. Apart from their subject, all these titles share one overarching theme: a scepticism of the official narrative. Indeed, as yet, there is no book published that supports that narrative. Of course, critics might explain this by arguing that conspiracy theories sell, which might well be true. One can fill bookcases with tomes suggesting JFK was killed by the CIA, the Cubans, the Russians, the mafia; just a shelf with those that lay the blame at the door of a lone, deranged gunman. But while this point has some justification, it also reflects something wider: a widespread concern in both cases that the official story just doesn’t stand up. Dr David Kelly was a scientist and leading authority on biological warfare. He had been a weapons inspector in Russia and Iraq (indeed, the book Dark Actors by Robert Lewis goes into some depth on his work as a weapons inspector) and was due to return to Iraq with an inspection team. Most recently, he had been advising on the dossier being drawn up by the Joint Intelligence Committee regarding the threat of Iraq’s WMD programme and it was this work that was to seal his fate. Kelly regularly met with journalists and he briefed the journalist Andrew Gilligan on the dossier. Gilligan, in a radio broadcast for the BBC Today Programme, went onto claim that a source had said that Alastair Campbell, Tony Blair’s spin doctor, had “sexed up” the dossier. Campbell took this badly and in the ensuing protracted showdown between the government and the BBC, Kelly was outed as Gilligan’s source. Interestingly, Dr Kelly always denied being Gilligan’s source, something which Goslett examines and gives credence to. I have to admit to having never seriously considered the prospect that Gilligan might have had a second, more authoritative source, and the author makes a good case that this might in fact have been so In the following weeks, Kelly’s home was besieged by journalists, he was compelled to give evidence before two select committees - one of which was televised - and if one believes the official narrative, finding the pressure too much to bear, coupled with a belief that he would never again be allowed to continue work as a weapons inspector, he made his way to nearby Harrowdown Hill, where he took an overdose of Co-Proxamol tablets and slashed the ulnar artery of his left wrist. Goslett’s book outlines all this in fair detail before going onto discuss the problems with this story. First and foremost, he takes issue with the Hutton Inquiry itself, which stopped an inquest from ever being held into Kelly’s death. Inquests in UK law are supremely independent bodies with the power to summon witnesses and have them give evidence on oath, conversely the Hutton Inquiry was entirely voluntary, with no actual legal powers. I have to confess to not having realised that at the time, so this was a revelation. Goslett implies that this was why the inquiry was set up in the first place, to ensure a less than adequate examination of Kelly’s death. Goslett also discusses all the inconsistencies with the evidence, the fact that many medical experts’ query whether slashing the ulnar artery would be sufficient to bleed to death (it’s very thin, like a fine thread, and might well clot) and whether he had enough Co-Proxamol in his system to cause a fatal overdose. Combined with the evidence that he had difficulty swallowing pills and that due to an arm injury he had such weakness in the right arm that he found it difficult to cut a steak, let alone cut through the flesh, muscle and tendons of his left wrist (Kelly was right handed), it is not difficult to understand why Goslett and others have doubts. A book review doesn’t give one enough space to go through all the evidence that Goslett marshals to support his case, for that one needs to read the book, but needless to say there is much more. But does it all mean that Kelly did not in fact take his own life? And if not, how did he come to die? Frustratingly, the author does not reveal his beliefs on the matter, preferring to argue that there is a need now for a proper inquest to discover the truth. This feels unsatisfactory in the extreme. Bearing in mind that most people who read this title will have followed the case to a greater or lesser extent, will have an opinion either way, the least Goslett can do is put his forward. While his arguments for the need for an inquest are sound (would it not put the matter to rest, at least? Surely, regardless of whether one believes Kelly committed suicide, all can agree the Hutton Report was flawed) I personally feel he overstates his argument that the Hutton Inquiry was an effective means of silencing the matter. For surely coroners and inquests can be got at? The Hutton Inquiry became an international televisual spectacle, something that came to define Blair’s legacy, and it was obvious this was going to be the case at the time. Would it not have been easier to have the inquest and try and fix the result, perhaps by influencing what witnesses would say? That said, as he points out, Blair ordered the inquiry the very night Kelly’s body was discovered, and the Hutton Inquiry - both its commission and process - were curious to say the least. For the record, I’m personally in two minds as to whether Dr David Kelly committed suicide or was murdered, and if the latter, by who. I do agree with the author that there should be an inquest and that the Hutton Inquiry was a whitewash, but equally I am both doubtful that this will ever come to pass or that we will ever definitively have the truth, not least due to the fact that Lord Hutton ordered much of the evidence - including Dr Kelly’s post-mortem report - be sealed for seventy years.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Wij

    This is an excellent analysis of the many inconsistencies surrounding the death of Dr Kelly. The author stays on the right side of the line between investigative journalism and conspiracy theory, by simply laying out facts as we know them, rather than indulging in wild flights of fancy. This is not a straightforward story, but Goslett's clear, journalistic style is the best way to tell it. The fact is, we don't know what happened to Kelly, which is why there needed to be a proper inquest, rather This is an excellent analysis of the many inconsistencies surrounding the death of Dr Kelly. The author stays on the right side of the line between investigative journalism and conspiracy theory, by simply laying out facts as we know them, rather than indulging in wild flights of fancy. This is not a straightforward story, but Goslett's clear, journalistic style is the best way to tell it. The fact is, we don't know what happened to Kelly, which is why there needed to be a proper inquest, rather than relying on the findings of the toothless Hutton Inquiry. It is this point the book makes, and it does it clearly and forensically. Great stuff.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Lesley

    Having followed this case in the papers since Dr Kelly's death, I found this absolutely riveting, and had to pick it up every time I sat down. The book asks a lot more questions than it answers, but asks the questions every thinking person knows need to be answered. Tony Blair's government, and Mr Blair himself, has a lot to answer about the indecent speed in which the Hutton public inquiry was set up, with none of the main players having any coronial experience whatever, and the complete lack of Having followed this case in the papers since Dr Kelly's death, I found this absolutely riveting, and had to pick it up every time I sat down. The book asks a lot more questions than it answers, but asks the questions every thinking person knows need to be answered. Tony Blair's government, and Mr Blair himself, has a lot to answer about the indecent speed in which the Hutton public inquiry was set up, with none of the main players having any coronial experience whatever, and the complete lack of a (necessary by law) full inquest into the death. I've never believed Dr Kelly's death was as portrayed by the government, and this book puts more questions in my head, with complete clarity - not least of all is why Dr Kelly's remains were exhumed in 2017 and all traces of the grave removed. I have to say, Mrs Kelly - to me - doesn't come out of this book well. According to the account given, she used avoidance tactics to questions at every turn, and I felt this right from the start of the book. However, I strongly suspect government manipulation was at play, dictating her responses which had no substance to them. Recommend if you have followed the papers.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Richard Thomas

    Thought Provoking This is a thorough and convincing account of the death and the subsequent treatment of the death of Dr David Kelly. The rush on the part of Blair and the interested parties in his government to set up an Inquiry which bypassed the established and indeed normally legal means of examining deaths has always been suspicious and after 16 years remains so. The author goes through the whole case coolly and objectively and scrutinises all the unanswered questions that the Hutton Inquir Thought Provoking This is a thorough and convincing account of the death and the subsequent treatment of the death of Dr David Kelly. The rush on the part of Blair and the interested parties in his government to set up an Inquiry which bypassed the established and indeed normally legal means of examining deaths has always been suspicious and after 16 years remains so. The author goes through the whole case coolly and objectively and scrutinises all the unanswered questions that the Hutton Inquiry neglected to examine in the haste to cover up the circumstances of Dr Kelly’s death. For my part, I remain suspicious of the whole case which the government tried to make.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Sorrento

    Miles Goslett has written a meticulously well researched book about the very sad demise of David Kelly the quietly spoken and well-respected weapons inspector who was part of the team looking for weapons of mass destruction at the lead up to the Iraq war. The book begins by reminding us of the events prior to David Kelly’s death including the interview on the BBC Today programme by Andrew Gilligan where he claimed that a source had told him that the government’s case for war had been ’sexed up’. Miles Goslett has written a meticulously well researched book about the very sad demise of David Kelly the quietly spoken and well-respected weapons inspector who was part of the team looking for weapons of mass destruction at the lead up to the Iraq war. The book begins by reminding us of the events prior to David Kelly’s death including the interview on the BBC Today programme by Andrew Gilligan where he claimed that a source had told him that the government’s case for war had been ’sexed up’. There was then the role of senior politicians and advisors including, Tony Blair, Alistair Campbell and Geoff Hoon and the BBC itself who were involved in the outing of David Kelly as the source. Goslett reminds us of the immense pressure Dr Kelly was under as he was required to give evidence in public to the Foreign Affairs Select committee including the robust questioning by one member of the committee who suggested he was “chaff”. Following the death of Dr Kelly at Harrowdown Hill Goslett goes onto describe how Tony Blair and Lord Falconer hastily announced the setting up of the Hutton inquiry even before the body had been formerly identified and a cause of death established. Goslett explains how the Hutton inquiry with no formal powers to compel witnesses to appear or to give evidence on oath took precedence over the statutory coroner’s inquest which has those powers. Goslett forensically examines the evidence given at the Hutton inquiry and describes in detail the catalogue of inconsistencies which were not challenged. At the end of the book I was left with the impression that Hutton was a very poor inquiry into the death of Dr Kelly and no substitute for a coroner’s inquest. Hutton concluded that Dr Kelly committed suicide. (The book by the way reminds us that David Kelly’s own mother committed suicide when he was 20 years old studying at Leeds university). I myself am very sad for the Kelly family and I now wonder if a coroner’s inquest would have come to the same conclusion as Lord Hutton.

  6. 5 out of 5

    John Morris

    An outstanding and disturbing story. The Dr. Kelly affair stinks to high heaven and will forever be a stain on Tony Blair's legacy. If there is nothing to hide why can't they just come clean? The British establishment has a lot to answer for over this stain on our democracy and legal system. Well done Miles Goslett for keeping this story in the public domain. An outstanding and disturbing story. The Dr. Kelly affair stinks to high heaven and will forever be a stain on Tony Blair's legacy. If there is nothing to hide why can't they just come clean? The British establishment has a lot to answer for over this stain on our democracy and legal system. Well done Miles Goslett for keeping this story in the public domain.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Debbie Smith

    This is a meticulously researched book in which the author explains in minute detail the events leading up to Dr Kelly's suspicious death. It examines conflicting accounts of those who attend the scene while Kelly's body was in situ. It moves on to detail Kelly's last movements during the days leading up to his suicide/assassination. Perhaps most interesting was the Hutton Inquiry being put under the microscope and highlights many inconsistencies at the hearing and what seems to be a determined This is a meticulously researched book in which the author explains in minute detail the events leading up to Dr Kelly's suspicious death. It examines conflicting accounts of those who attend the scene while Kelly's body was in situ. It moves on to detail Kelly's last movements during the days leading up to his suicide/assassination. Perhaps most interesting was the Hutton Inquiry being put under the microscope and highlights many inconsistencies at the hearing and what seems to be a determined cover up of the truth. The government narrative had seemingly already been decided and all the evidence given was conveniently manipulated to suit that narrative. The book certainly raises more questions than answers and leaves one thinking there is more to this case other than a simple suicide. It just reaffirms my belief that foul play occurred and Kelly was assassinated by security intelligence and clumsily made it look like suicide. A very informative read for those who were never satisfied by the conclusion of the Hutton. Read it for an in depth look into all the circumstances and form your own conclusion.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Anne

    The death of Dr David Kelly was well publicised in the media in 2003. Tony blair was Prime Minister and was urgently providing evidence that Saddam Hussein was producing weapons of mass destruction that carried a major threat Dr. Michael Kelly, an expert on weapons of mass destruction was under pressure to provide this evidence. On 22nd May 2003 Dr Kelly met with Andrew Gilligan, the defence correspondent of BBC 4's - Today programme and shortly after that Dr Kelly was outed as a source for Andrew The death of Dr David Kelly was well publicised in the media in 2003. Tony blair was Prime Minister and was urgently providing evidence that Saddam Hussein was producing weapons of mass destruction that carried a major threat Dr. Michael Kelly, an expert on weapons of mass destruction was under pressure to provide this evidence. On 22nd May 2003 Dr Kelly met with Andrew Gilligan, the defence correspondent of BBC 4's - Today programme and shortly after that Dr Kelly was outed as a source for Andrew Gilligan. On the 17th July 2003, Dr Kelly left his home to go for his usual walk and did not return home. His body was found and a verdict of suicide given, but was it suicide ? This book is an analysis of the many inconsistencies surrounding his death and there appear to be many. This is a compelling book to read and it raises more questions than answers. I would highly recommend this well written book.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Paul baker

    Mountains out of mole hills It is an interesting account of events surrounding the WMD argument in the Iraq war and the suicide of Dr Kelly who was outed on TV as having lied to his MoD bosses about contact with another journalist other than Gilligan after promising them it wasn’t true just the day before. As usual Gilligan gets the journalist’s free pass despite him setting up Kelly and effectively destroying his life. Much of the book revolves around and keeps repeating ‘odd’ things about the c Mountains out of mole hills It is an interesting account of events surrounding the WMD argument in the Iraq war and the suicide of Dr Kelly who was outed on TV as having lied to his MoD bosses about contact with another journalist other than Gilligan after promising them it wasn’t true just the day before. As usual Gilligan gets the journalist’s free pass despite him setting up Kelly and effectively destroying his life. Much of the book revolves around and keeps repeating ‘odd’ things about the case such as his dentist thinking for a day or so his medical records had been stolen. As to why somebody would want to steal them there is no answer. The media storm over the issue was primarily from the Right and seen as an ideal opportunity to bash Blair, Campbell and Labour. This book merely repeats the Daily Mail version of possible events in a rather dull and repetitive way.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jeremy

    Excellent. A sobre, thorough examination of the events leading up to Kelly's death and the subsequent inquiry that followed it. It raises far more questions than it answers. In a sense, that's to its author's credit. He refuses to advance conspiracy theories, but instead points out the (often glaring) inconsistencies in key witness statements and the curious decisions not to call witnesses to the Hutton Inquiry that would counter the prevailing suicide narrative and verdict. His call for a proper Excellent. A sobre, thorough examination of the events leading up to Kelly's death and the subsequent inquiry that followed it. It raises far more questions than it answers. In a sense, that's to its author's credit. He refuses to advance conspiracy theories, but instead points out the (often glaring) inconsistencies in key witness statements and the curious decisions not to call witnesses to the Hutton Inquiry that would counter the prevailing suicide narrative and verdict. His call for a proper inquest into Kelly's death seems entirely reasonable given the evidence presented here that the Hutton Inquiry simply did not do a good enough job. As far as its literary merits are concerned, I've got no complaints here. For someone like me (interested but not especially well-informed), the book is clear, easy to follow and difficult to put down. Recommended.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Johanne

    The Chilcot report concluded that the judgements about the severity of the threat posed by Iraq's weapons of mass destruction were presented with a certainty that was not justified. Journalist Andrew Gilligan was first to suggest this but refused to divulge his source. The source was identified as Dr David Kelly. The public will likely never know whether or not David Kelly was the source. And the public will likely never know the exact definitive cause of David Kelly's death. Whatever the truth and The Chilcot report concluded that the judgements about the severity of the threat posed by Iraq's weapons of mass destruction were presented with a certainty that was not justified. Journalist Andrew Gilligan was first to suggest this but refused to divulge his source. The source was identified as Dr David Kelly. The public will likely never know whether or not David Kelly was the source. And the public will likely never know the exact definitive cause of David Kelly's death. Whatever the truth and the facts, David Kelly and his family have paid the ultimate price.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Irene Young

    Very interesting As you read this book you ask yourself what were the powers that be ,hiding.A very absorbing story and a mystery that will not be solved until a proper inquest is held.I do not think we shall see that any time soon and the feeling will remain that we were not told the truth about the demise of Dr David Kelly and therefore justice will not have been done. An interesting well told tale. a

  13. 4 out of 5

    Roy

    I have read this book, and like most people I consider David Kelly’s death to have been murder and the likes of Blair and Campbell, (and a number of others) should have been put before the international courts, on that charge. There is just one thing that I find wrong about this book and that is its name. The title should really have been. A Convenient Death. Which is what it was.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Stewart Cotterill

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This book forensically dissects the Hutton Inquiry and it’s inconsistencies in its line of questioning. It fatally pierces a hole below the water line in the inquiry and shows why there has to be a Coroners Inquiry into Dr Kelly’s death to provide real justice for the man himself, regardless of the passage of time.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Llew Sadler

    Clarification * Verification & an Unbiased Assessment I can remember the Dr Kelly case and the anger & unease I was left with on the conclusion of the Hutton enquiry. Why was it felt necessary for Tony Blair to act so swiftly? What was there to hide. Having read this book my original conclusions have been confirmed , they had a lot!!! One day the truth will out.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Philip Doggart

    Scandal that does not go away Good to be reminded of the greatest scandal of the Blair years. The death of David Kelly was not easily explained. This book uncovers all the evidence needed to know that as well as highlighting the incredibly lax police and judicial work around his death.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Joanna Barchet

    Quite an interesting read but I wasn't keen on the writing style. The description of events seems made up at times and leans heavily on speculation. I found myself skimming the book at times. I'd recommend this one if you like a good conspiracy theory. Quite an interesting read but I wasn't keen on the writing style. The description of events seems made up at times and leans heavily on speculation. I found myself skimming the book at times. I'd recommend this one if you like a good conspiracy theory.

  18. 4 out of 5

    william carr

    A struggle This was a struggle to finish i read the same arguments over and over again i have no doubt the establishment has covered for many atrocities over the years and the background story here is very suspicious but the book was full of repeated evidence

  19. 4 out of 5

    Lin Fisher

    Perfidious Albion This book raises, sky high, the need for an honest in depth and independent inquest into David Kelly's untimely death. Perfidious Albion This book raises, sky high, the need for an honest in depth and independent inquest into David Kelly's untimely death.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Colby

    Painstakingly researched + incontrovertible [let down by 'hack-writing]. Why no uproar? Painstakingly researched + incontrovertible [let down by 'hack-writing]. Why no uproar?

  21. 4 out of 5

    Moirad

    Excellent analysis, and horrifying conclusions drawn.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Julie Melson

    What is the truth? If all this is true why isn't something being done? If everything is how the enquiry said it was why has it been locked for seventy years? What is the truth? If all this is true why isn't something being done? If everything is how the enquiry said it was why has it been locked for seventy years?

  23. 4 out of 5

    Mary Smith

    Questions and more questions Very interesting. Someone somewhere knows a lot more than they are telling. Leaves a lot of unanswered questions. Well worth reading.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Philip Carman

    Very interesting book .

  25. 4 out of 5

    Mike Whiskey Bravo

    Summed up in these few words. "He couldn't even cut a steak properly, due to a horrendous riding injury." Summed up in these few words. "He couldn't even cut a steak properly, due to a horrendous riding injury."

  26. 4 out of 5

    Don

    VERY suspicious death. WITH other news coming out nothing would surprise me

  27. 5 out of 5

    Kyle Williams

    4.5 stars

  28. 5 out of 5

    David Little

    Repetitive but illuminating

  29. 4 out of 5

    Harry

    While this book doesn't answer many questions, in does well to highlight the many inconsistency and oddities that make this tragic death so controversial. While this book doesn't answer many questions, in does well to highlight the many inconsistency and oddities that make this tragic death so controversial.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Amy Fitzsimmons

    This book really thoroughly explored the death of Dr Kelly and the states intriguing actions before, during and after the affair. a side affect however of the intense detail is that it jumped around and was sometimes hard to follow when it referred to evidence or an event that had been explored several chapters previous.

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