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COSSACK FAIRY & FOLK TALES - 27 Illustrated Ukrainian Children's tales (Myths, Legend and Folk Tales from Around the World)

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In this volume you will find 27 illustrated with a uniquely Slavonic flavour. In this volume you will find stories like “The Story Of Unlucky Daniel”, “The Vampire And St Michael”, “The Tsar And The Angel”, “The Story Of Ivan And The Daughter Of The Sun”, “The Straw Ox”, “The Golden Slipper”, “The Iron Wolf”, “The Story of the Wind” and many more, most not heard in the wes In this volume you will find 27 illustrated with a uniquely Slavonic flavour. In this volume you will find stories like “The Story Of Unlucky Daniel”, “The Vampire And St Michael”, “The Tsar And The Angel”, “The Story Of Ivan And The Daughter Of The Sun”, “The Straw Ox”, “The Golden Slipper”, “The Iron Wolf”, “The Story of the Wind” and many more, most not heard in the west for many a year. This volume of stories has been selected from a Slavonic dialect extraordinarily rich in folk-tales. The original language was Ruthenian, the language of the Ukrainian Steppe, and of the Cossacks. This was the first translation ever made from Ruthenian into English. Until Ukrainian independence the language was rigorously repressed by the Soviet Government, and has since been a foundation from which modern Ukrainian has been developed. It possesses a noble literature, numerous folk-songs and a copious collection of justly admired folk-tales, many of them of great antiquity, which are regarded, both in Russia and Poland, as quite unique of their kind. Because of this, these stories have a distinctly Slavic flavour for the Cossacks are a proud race of predominantly East Slavic-speaking people mainly located in Southern Russia and in South-Eastern Ukraine usually sparsely populated areas and islands in the lower Dnieper, Don, Terek and Ural river basins. They played an important role in the historical and cultural development of Ukraine. So, we invite you to download this collection of Cossack culture, sit back and enjoy these stories before you embark on reading them to a younger audience. 10% of the net profit from the sale of this book will be donated to charities. YESTERDAY’S BOOKS for TODAYS CHARITIES TAGS: folklore, fairy, tales, stories, myths, legends, fables, Cossack, Ukraine, Ruthenian, Slavic, Dniepr, Don, Terek, Ural, tsar of the forest, story of the wind, voices at the window, story of little tsar novishny, false sister, faithful beasts, vampire and st Michael, story of tremsin,  bird zhar, nastasia, lovely maid of the sea, serpent-wife, story of unlucky Daniel, sparrow and the bush, old dog, fox and the cat, straw ox, golden slipper, iron wolf, three brothers, tsar and the angel, story of ivan, daughter of the sun, the cat, the cock, the fox, serpent tsarevich, two wives, origin of the mole, two princes, ungrateful children, old father, went to school again, ivan the fool, st. peter’s fife, magic egg, forty-first brother, unlucky days, wondrous story, ivan golik, serpents


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In this volume you will find 27 illustrated with a uniquely Slavonic flavour. In this volume you will find stories like “The Story Of Unlucky Daniel”, “The Vampire And St Michael”, “The Tsar And The Angel”, “The Story Of Ivan And The Daughter Of The Sun”, “The Straw Ox”, “The Golden Slipper”, “The Iron Wolf”, “The Story of the Wind” and many more, most not heard in the wes In this volume you will find 27 illustrated with a uniquely Slavonic flavour. In this volume you will find stories like “The Story Of Unlucky Daniel”, “The Vampire And St Michael”, “The Tsar And The Angel”, “The Story Of Ivan And The Daughter Of The Sun”, “The Straw Ox”, “The Golden Slipper”, “The Iron Wolf”, “The Story of the Wind” and many more, most not heard in the west for many a year. This volume of stories has been selected from a Slavonic dialect extraordinarily rich in folk-tales. The original language was Ruthenian, the language of the Ukrainian Steppe, and of the Cossacks. This was the first translation ever made from Ruthenian into English. Until Ukrainian independence the language was rigorously repressed by the Soviet Government, and has since been a foundation from which modern Ukrainian has been developed. It possesses a noble literature, numerous folk-songs and a copious collection of justly admired folk-tales, many of them of great antiquity, which are regarded, both in Russia and Poland, as quite unique of their kind. Because of this, these stories have a distinctly Slavic flavour for the Cossacks are a proud race of predominantly East Slavic-speaking people mainly located in Southern Russia and in South-Eastern Ukraine usually sparsely populated areas and islands in the lower Dnieper, Don, Terek and Ural river basins. They played an important role in the historical and cultural development of Ukraine. So, we invite you to download this collection of Cossack culture, sit back and enjoy these stories before you embark on reading them to a younger audience. 10% of the net profit from the sale of this book will be donated to charities. YESTERDAY’S BOOKS for TODAYS CHARITIES TAGS: folklore, fairy, tales, stories, myths, legends, fables, Cossack, Ukraine, Ruthenian, Slavic, Dniepr, Don, Terek, Ural, tsar of the forest, story of the wind, voices at the window, story of little tsar novishny, false sister, faithful beasts, vampire and st Michael, story of tremsin,  bird zhar, nastasia, lovely maid of the sea, serpent-wife, story of unlucky Daniel, sparrow and the bush, old dog, fox and the cat, straw ox, golden slipper, iron wolf, three brothers, tsar and the angel, story of ivan, daughter of the sun, the cat, the cock, the fox, serpent tsarevich, two wives, origin of the mole, two princes, ungrateful children, old father, went to school again, ivan the fool, st. peter’s fife, magic egg, forty-first brother, unlucky days, wondrous story, ivan golik, serpents

30 review for COSSACK FAIRY & FOLK TALES - 27 Illustrated Ukrainian Children's tales (Myths, Legend and Folk Tales from Around the World)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Tim

    I believe I got the original link to this volume through StumbleUpon. The link was to archive.com, which had a digitized version of the original 1916 edition of this book. While it had a number of very detailed and intriguing illustrations, by Noel L. Nisbet, the text was a bit difficult to read as the “paper” was more light gray than white. I subsequently found out that there was a free Kindle edition, so I also got that (the type is crisper and larger, for my old eyes). Thus, I went back and f I believe I got the original link to this volume through StumbleUpon. The link was to archive.com, which had a digitized version of the original 1916 edition of this book. While it had a number of very detailed and intriguing illustrations, by Noel L. Nisbet, the text was a bit difficult to read as the “paper” was more light gray than white. I subsequently found out that there was a free Kindle edition, so I also got that (the type is crisper and larger, for my old eyes). Thus, I went back and forth between the versions, reading the Kindle and going to the illustrations from the archive.com one. The editor/translator, R. Nisbet Bain, who had also edited a previous book of Russian folk tales, explains in the Introduction that the Cossacks lived in a remote area of what is now the Ukraine and spoke Ruthenian. Most were hardscrapple farmers. As the Cossacks were persecuted by the Russian government, who tried to ban the use of Ruthenian, they but did not succeed. Mr. Bain’s collection is culled from three other collections, each reflecting a different dialect of Ruthenian, most from the mid-1800s. As for the stories themselves, they are replete with Tsars (I believe they were regional rulers then) and Tsarvinas (their wives), woodland sprites, flying serpents, multiple farmers’ daughters, seductive witches, rich and poor sons, and beneath it all, LOTS of magic. There are certainly similarities between these and other fairy tales (the Cinderella tale is almost identical), and there are themes of dire consequences for not using one’s judgment when warned about NOT kissing your wife for a certain amount of time or killing a steer or some other such proscription; more than one of these protagonists has forfeited their wealth/marriage/farmlands by doing so! Other characteristics relate to a serpent/Tsar/saint/evil lord giving the protagonist a number of impossible tasks to complete before the dawn, with our hero being saved by a fairy or other similar being in repayment for a kindness. Most of the human characters are either farmers (as, I would surmise, were most of the Cossacks of the time) or Tsars. There are also some themes which our 21st-century enlightened minds would tend to cringe at; for example, Jews are stereotyped as evil, manipulative and only concerned about money; and somehow mistreating and beating one’s wife is considered de rigeur. Nonetheless, they were, I suppose, reflective of the culture at the time. All in all, I greatly enjoyed this collection, and would recommend it for anyone interested in folk tales or historical literature.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Shelly

    Folktale motif (Three Sons) Nesbit Bain, Robert translator, Cossack Fairy Tales and Folktales. The Three Brothers is a Ukrainian folktale. The father gives them the task of guarding the golden apple trees from a hog who has been digging them up. The oldest brother stands guard and falls asleep while the hog digs up a tree. Next the second brother does the same. The youngest is labeled the fool and the father tells him not to bother but he takes a gun goes to guard the trees. He succeeds and kills Folktale motif (Three Sons) Nesbit Bain, Robert translator, Cossack Fairy Tales and Folktales. The Three Brothers is a Ukrainian folktale. The father gives them the task of guarding the golden apple trees from a hog who has been digging them up. The oldest brother stands guard and falls asleep while the hog digs up a tree. Next the second brother does the same. The youngest is labeled the fool and the father tells him not to bother but he takes a gun goes to guard the trees. He succeeds and kills the hog. The two brothers hear the shoots and find the fool brother with the dead hog. The oldest decides to kill the brother and bury him in a ditch so he can claim the hog himself. He doesn't get away with the crime because a singing flute tells the story to the father and the father kills the oldest son. The language is a little hard to understand and there are no illustrations to help with the story. The story is a good example of how folktales were used to convey the message that the truth always comes out. The story would not be appropriate for younger children. The target audience 15-18 years old.

  3. 4 out of 5

    heidi

    Very, very peculiar tales. I spent most of my time thinking, Is this really what they taught their children?? Most of the characters don't deserve their happy endings / good fortunes. But who am I to disagree. Perhaps that's the biggest moral of this collection of tales: life is almost never fair.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jessica Roberts

    Not homogenized These are definitely Cossack fairy tales, not Anglicized like the Andrew Lang fairy books. Don't get me wrong, I LIKE Andrew Lang; but it's nice to read English translation with out the English stereotypes.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Noach

    Unfortunately this work is explicitly anti-Semitic.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Angie

    a lot of the people in the stories were really selfish and ended up living good lives while still being selfish

  7. 4 out of 5

    A Rae Crownover

  8. 5 out of 5

    Cj Crennell

  9. 4 out of 5

    Endril

  10. 5 out of 5

    Dave Lusby

  11. 5 out of 5

    Briar Rose

  12. 4 out of 5

    Matt

  13. 5 out of 5

    Liz Coppock

  14. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

  15. 4 out of 5

    Josef

  16. 4 out of 5

    emily marquardt

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jamelle

  18. 4 out of 5

    Silvana Pellegrini Adam

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jim Bell

  20. 5 out of 5

    Alexandria S. Handley

  21. 4 out of 5

    Sonal Panse

  22. 4 out of 5

    Patrick

  23. 4 out of 5

    Christopher S. Everly

  24. 4 out of 5

    Molly Palmer

  25. 4 out of 5

    Sarah A. Mikell

  26. 4 out of 5

    Fredorourke

  27. 5 out of 5

    Debby Cash

  28. 5 out of 5

    Katrina

  29. 4 out of 5

    Katherine Cooper

  30. 5 out of 5

    THOMAS MCKEARN

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