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*Includes pictures *Includes contemporary accounts *Includes online resources and a bibliography for further reading *Includes a table of contents Many Americans labor under the misconception that the nation’s colonial and national heritage was almost wholly accomplished by an English migration, and the notion of early American diversity ends at an acknowledgment of the s *Includes pictures *Includes contemporary accounts *Includes online resources and a bibliography for further reading *Includes a table of contents Many Americans labor under the misconception that the nation’s colonial and national heritage was almost wholly accomplished by an English migration, and the notion of early American diversity ends at an acknowledgment of the slave trade conducted between Southern buyers, Northern shippers, the African continent and the Caribbean region. However, early America witnessed the development of New York by the Dutch, the southernmost regions by Spain, and what would become eastern Canada by the French after lengthy battles with Britain. In fact, the Seven Years’ War during the 1750s was fought on a nearly global scale between several European belligerents. As a result, when the Revolution began, the Continental Army sported numerous volunteers from Ireland, Scotland, virtually every European nation between France and Russia, and men from the northern and southern borders of the European continent. There are good reasons America doesn’t possess a constitutionally-confirmed national language, despite an English-speaking majority; among the early proposals for such a common language, German and French served as contenders, with the latter going on to become Western Europe’s official diplomatic language. Likewise, those who accomplished the legislative, diplomatic, and military miracles that helped 13 separate colonies hold off the greatest power in the world represented a multi-national heritage. The prospects for a rustic, untrained revolution across the Atlantic carried powerful ramifications for politics, economics, and cultural identity of the individual. Autocrats of the 18th century feared an emerging model from the British-American war that might be refashioned by dissidents within their own colonies. Among those living the consequences of defeat and exile, the soldier class of Europe paid particularly close attention. Some were rapt by the growing ideology of the Enlightenment movement as it pertained to their own cultures while others grew weary of inertia imposed by an inability to practice their craft. For the gifted Tadeusz Kościuszko, both were likely true. However, Poland’s famous soldier, artist, engineer, and statesman possessed a uniquely expanded vision that perceived the American conflict as the test of a new universal paradigm. A philosophical revolution in itself, the vision held by Locke and Jefferson for a previously unknown standard of individual liberty found an obsessive place in Kościuszko’s life view. His response to its power was to make him a much-heralded citizen of both continents in perpetuity, in war and peacetime. A hero in Poland, Lithuania, and Belarus, Kościuszko not only fought as an officer in the Continental Army of General Washington, but also designed and constructed the defenses for some of America’s earliest cities and important military defenses. As a friend to the fledgling state, he went on to lead a “national insurrection” in his Polish homeland against centuries-old Russian domination, mirroring the American effort. Denying allegiance and assistance to Tsars and Emperors such as Catherine and Napoleon unless Polish independence was guaranteed, Kościuszko witnessed the disappearance of Poland from the world map, an absence not rectified for well over a century. Today, streets, bridges, monuments, and even neighborhoods bear Kościuszko’s name across the country, and in Polish communities, he is often hailed as a hero equal to General Washington himself. Tadeusz Kościuszko: The Life and Legacy of Poland’s Most Famous General profiles one of the Revolutionary War’s most important figures.


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*Includes pictures *Includes contemporary accounts *Includes online resources and a bibliography for further reading *Includes a table of contents Many Americans labor under the misconception that the nation’s colonial and national heritage was almost wholly accomplished by an English migration, and the notion of early American diversity ends at an acknowledgment of the s *Includes pictures *Includes contemporary accounts *Includes online resources and a bibliography for further reading *Includes a table of contents Many Americans labor under the misconception that the nation’s colonial and national heritage was almost wholly accomplished by an English migration, and the notion of early American diversity ends at an acknowledgment of the slave trade conducted between Southern buyers, Northern shippers, the African continent and the Caribbean region. However, early America witnessed the development of New York by the Dutch, the southernmost regions by Spain, and what would become eastern Canada by the French after lengthy battles with Britain. In fact, the Seven Years’ War during the 1750s was fought on a nearly global scale between several European belligerents. As a result, when the Revolution began, the Continental Army sported numerous volunteers from Ireland, Scotland, virtually every European nation between France and Russia, and men from the northern and southern borders of the European continent. There are good reasons America doesn’t possess a constitutionally-confirmed national language, despite an English-speaking majority; among the early proposals for such a common language, German and French served as contenders, with the latter going on to become Western Europe’s official diplomatic language. Likewise, those who accomplished the legislative, diplomatic, and military miracles that helped 13 separate colonies hold off the greatest power in the world represented a multi-national heritage. The prospects for a rustic, untrained revolution across the Atlantic carried powerful ramifications for politics, economics, and cultural identity of the individual. Autocrats of the 18th century feared an emerging model from the British-American war that might be refashioned by dissidents within their own colonies. Among those living the consequences of defeat and exile, the soldier class of Europe paid particularly close attention. Some were rapt by the growing ideology of the Enlightenment movement as it pertained to their own cultures while others grew weary of inertia imposed by an inability to practice their craft. For the gifted Tadeusz Kościuszko, both were likely true. However, Poland’s famous soldier, artist, engineer, and statesman possessed a uniquely expanded vision that perceived the American conflict as the test of a new universal paradigm. A philosophical revolution in itself, the vision held by Locke and Jefferson for a previously unknown standard of individual liberty found an obsessive place in Kościuszko’s life view. His response to its power was to make him a much-heralded citizen of both continents in perpetuity, in war and peacetime. A hero in Poland, Lithuania, and Belarus, Kościuszko not only fought as an officer in the Continental Army of General Washington, but also designed and constructed the defenses for some of America’s earliest cities and important military defenses. As a friend to the fledgling state, he went on to lead a “national insurrection” in his Polish homeland against centuries-old Russian domination, mirroring the American effort. Denying allegiance and assistance to Tsars and Emperors such as Catherine and Napoleon unless Polish independence was guaranteed, Kościuszko witnessed the disappearance of Poland from the world map, an absence not rectified for well over a century. Today, streets, bridges, monuments, and even neighborhoods bear Kościuszko’s name across the country, and in Polish communities, he is often hailed as a hero equal to General Washington himself. Tadeusz Kościuszko: The Life and Legacy of Poland’s Most Famous General profiles one of the Revolutionary War’s most important figures.

31 review for Tadeusz Kościuszko: The Life and Legacy of Poland’s Most Famous General

  1. 5 out of 5

    Richard Brylczyk

    This book provided more details on Kosziusko's life than I had ever heard. His passion for individual freedoms and for Poland's existence were marvelous. He would have been a great leader of the new USA if he had abandoned Poland and embraced his American citizenship. His frustrations in support of Polish independence were a tragic denouement for a hero such as he was. Good book but a map of the boundaries of European countries would have been useful in explaining his activities. This book provided more details on Kosziusko's life than I had ever heard. His passion for individual freedoms and for Poland's existence were marvelous. He would have been a great leader of the new USA if he had abandoned Poland and embraced his American citizenship. His frustrations in support of Polish independence were a tragic denouement for a hero such as he was. Good book but a map of the boundaries of European countries would have been useful in explaining his activities.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Aga

    The main reason I liked this book is because of Tadeusz Kościuszko's interesting life. The book itself was written in a wikipedia page format, it felt like I was just reading a list of facts. Some history writers are able to make a story come alive - this author was not able to do so. The main reason I liked this book is because of Tadeusz Kościuszko's interesting life. The book itself was written in a wikipedia page format, it felt like I was just reading a list of facts. Some history writers are able to make a story come alive - this author was not able to do so.

  3. 5 out of 5

    David Den Boer

    Poland’s Hero This was my first book into my polish and Eastern European ancestry, how it connected with Chief Little Turtle of the Miami tribe in the new world connected the pieces together for my from an American perspective.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Noemi

    "as pure a son of liberty as I have ever known" - Thomas Jefferson about Tadeusz Kościuszko "as pure a son of liberty as I have ever known" - Thomas Jefferson about Tadeusz Kościuszko

  5. 5 out of 5

    Mel

  6. 5 out of 5

    steven a smierciak

  7. 4 out of 5

    Tom Sells

  8. 4 out of 5

    Stan Krasovic

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jagoda Stokłosa

  10. 4 out of 5

    Glen R. Renfrew

  11. 5 out of 5

    Felix Kryzanowski

  12. 5 out of 5

    Brett

  13. 5 out of 5

    ken andrews

  14. 5 out of 5

    George Luft

  15. 4 out of 5

    tm

  16. 4 out of 5

    Christine

  17. 5 out of 5

    Lora

  18. 4 out of 5

    Leah Russell

  19. 4 out of 5

    Ted Baker

  20. 5 out of 5

    Gregory Cleva

  21. 5 out of 5

    Dallas Bailes

  22. 4 out of 5

    Rodolfo Correa

  23. 4 out of 5

    Klara Alarowna

  24. 4 out of 5

    Readonaire

  25. 5 out of 5

    VJ

  26. 4 out of 5

    Stephen Racz

  27. 5 out of 5

    Paweł

  28. 5 out of 5

    Krzysiek (Chris)

  29. 4 out of 5

    Marina

  30. 4 out of 5

    Bartosz

  31. 4 out of 5

    Darko Spelec

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