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Atomic Women: The Untold Stories of the Scientists Who Helped Create the Nuclear Bomb

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Bomb meets Code Girls in this nonfiction narrative about the little known female scientists who were critical to the invention of the atomic bomb--and the moral implications of their work. They were leaning over the edge of the unknown and were afraid of what they would discover there. Meet the World War II female scientists who worked in the secret sites of the Manhattan Bomb meets Code Girls in this nonfiction narrative about the little known female scientists who were critical to the invention of the atomic bomb--and the moral implications of their work. They were leaning over the edge of the unknown and were afraid of what they would discover there. Meet the World War II female scientists who worked in the secret sites of the Manhattan Project. Recruited not only from labs and universities from across the United States but also from countries abroad, these scientists helped in-and often initiated-the development of the atomic bomb, taking a starring role in the Manhattan Project. In fact, their involvement was critical to its success, though many of them were not fully aware of the consequences. The atomic women include Lise Meitner and Irène Joliot-Curie (daughter of Marie Curie), who led the groundwork for the Manhattan Project from Europe; Elizabeth Rona, the foremost expert in plutonium, who gave rise to the "Fat Man" and "Little Boy," the bombs dropped over Japan; and Leona Woods, Elizabeth Graves, and Joan Hinton, who were inspired by European scientific ideals but carved their own paths. This book explores not just the critical steps toward the creation of a successful nuclear bomb, but also the moral implications of such an invention.


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Bomb meets Code Girls in this nonfiction narrative about the little known female scientists who were critical to the invention of the atomic bomb--and the moral implications of their work. They were leaning over the edge of the unknown and were afraid of what they would discover there. Meet the World War II female scientists who worked in the secret sites of the Manhattan Bomb meets Code Girls in this nonfiction narrative about the little known female scientists who were critical to the invention of the atomic bomb--and the moral implications of their work. They were leaning over the edge of the unknown and were afraid of what they would discover there. Meet the World War II female scientists who worked in the secret sites of the Manhattan Project. Recruited not only from labs and universities from across the United States but also from countries abroad, these scientists helped in-and often initiated-the development of the atomic bomb, taking a starring role in the Manhattan Project. In fact, their involvement was critical to its success, though many of them were not fully aware of the consequences. The atomic women include Lise Meitner and Irène Joliot-Curie (daughter of Marie Curie), who led the groundwork for the Manhattan Project from Europe; Elizabeth Rona, the foremost expert in plutonium, who gave rise to the "Fat Man" and "Little Boy," the bombs dropped over Japan; and Leona Woods, Elizabeth Graves, and Joan Hinton, who were inspired by European scientific ideals but carved their own paths. This book explores not just the critical steps toward the creation of a successful nuclear bomb, but also the moral implications of such an invention.

30 review for Atomic Women: The Untold Stories of the Scientists Who Helped Create the Nuclear Bomb

  1. 5 out of 5

    Allison Liu

    *4.5 There were a lot of characters and it was slightly hard to keep track of all of them. However, the author did a great job of telling each characters part in a way that each woman was a distinct person. I loved the way the stories of all the women were weaved together and the effortless way the book switched between people. The book tells the story of not just the Manhattan Project, but the story of atomic and nuclear science. It begins with Marie Curie and ends with the detonation of the nu *4.5 There were a lot of characters and it was slightly hard to keep track of all of them. However, the author did a great job of telling each characters part in a way that each woman was a distinct person. I loved the way the stories of all the women were weaved together and the effortless way the book switched between people. The book tells the story of not just the Manhattan Project, but the story of atomic and nuclear science. It begins with Marie Curie and ends with the detonation of the nuclear bombs over Japan. What I loved the most was the way it highlighted the countless women that contributed so greatly to the project. It showed exactly what these women added and how without these amazing, knowledgeable women, the men we commonly credit with the success of the Manhattan Project couldn’t have occurred. I felt frustration for the women who were not credited by the men who prospered upon their input. This book was so amazing because it shed light on the contributions of women in nuclear science that shouldn’t be forgotten. And even so, there are so many scientists that weren’t mentioned in this book, but this was a great start. I learned a lot more about the Manhattan Project and how all these scientists came to be in the United States to share their knowledge.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jean-Christophe Armstrong

    Marie Curie is a badass.

  3. 4 out of 5

    TheDeityChildren

    The book was very short, only 200 pages, and written in a very simple, factual way, making it easy for me to read, but nothing in it particularly memorable. I was unable to keep track of all the scientists named in this book at points, which was annoying, as they’d pop up at random times. But all in all, it was an enjoyable book and a nice introduction for me to an event that I did not know very much about, putting the focus on women.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Hannah Nagy

    (I have the advanced copy!) Personally this book took me a long time to read. It switched from characters all the time and wasn’t done in an easy to understand way. It also didn’t really have a story line, which I know that it is nonfiction but if the events and people were changed in order it could possibly be better. I did however think that the information in the book was correct and explained well. Overall this book was great at giving the female scientists the correct acknowledgements.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Kate Waggoner

    @KidLitExchange Thank you to @littlebrownyoungreaders and @roseannemontillo for sharing an advance copy of Atomic Women: The Untold Stories of the Scientists Who Helped Create the Nuclear Bomb by Roseanne Montillo. It is set to release May 19, 2020. All opinions are my own. Atomic Women focuses on the female scientists who were either part of the Manhattan Project during WWII or who made a significant contribution to the science world that led to the creation of the first atomic bomb. The book is @KidLitExchange Thank you to @littlebrownyoungreaders and @roseannemontillo for sharing an advance copy of Atomic Women: The Untold Stories of the Scientists Who Helped Create the Nuclear Bomb by Roseanne Montillo. It is set to release May 19, 2020. All opinions are my own. Atomic Women focuses on the female scientists who were either part of the Manhattan Project during WWII or who made a significant contribution to the science world that led to the creation of the first atomic bomb. The book is divided into two sections: A European Beginning and Bomb Making in America. Women featured in the book include Lise Meitner, Elizabeth Rona, Leona Woods, Elizabeth Graves, and Joan Hinton. The book looks at the scientific journey that led to the creation of the bomb as well as its moral implications. I enjoyed learning about so many female scientists and the contributions they made. The Manhattan Project is something I learned about in school but I only knew names like Oppenheimer, Fermi, and Groves. I wasn't aware that so many women worked at the Manhattan Project and/or played a critical role in the development of ideas that led to the work at Los Alamos. The book seems well researched and is informative, but the structure is confusing at times. The book moves in a somewhat chronological order (though it does back track at times) starting with scientists like Marie Curie, Lise Meitner, and Elizabeth Rona and their work in Europe before crossing the pond and discussing the actual building of the bomb. Several of the women and men discussed in the novel appear in both sections of the book and the switching between individuals, time, and places can sometimes be disorienting. The book came across more as the history of the atomic bomb with a focus on the contributions of female scientists, rather than a book about the female scientists themselves. I also was a little disappointed to see that there were no photos in the book. I would have loved to see photos of the various scientists, their labs, experiments, etc. Overall, I felt I learned quite a bit about the time period and the women who helped develop the atomic bomb.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Alicia

    It's a short one. This is a super quick introduction to many of the names we've *sort of* heard and names that I haven't heard of related to the discovery of elements and science as they pertain to creating the atomic bomb. The book is written at a fast clip and many of the names come at you fast and furious and what I would have liked to have seen are pictures (whether they'll be in the final copy, I don't think so because there weren't any "picture TK" features) because it was hard to keep the It's a short one. This is a super quick introduction to many of the names we've *sort of* heard and names that I haven't heard of related to the discovery of elements and science as they pertain to creating the atomic bomb. The book is written at a fast clip and many of the names come at you fast and furious and what I would have liked to have seen are pictures (whether they'll be in the final copy, I don't think so because there weren't any "picture TK" features) because it was hard to keep them all straight. It was easier to almost organize them by their country of origin rather than their names specifically, but it's generally told chronologically with the ending being the dropping of the atomic bomb. The book is part science but mostly a biography of the scientists without much in the way of political or economic impact. It talks about publishing papers after discoveries, the discrimination of women in the scientific field, and the toil it took to put it all together.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    I enjoyed the writing, but this was....kind of a mess. The timelines hopped all over, the book's only a little over 200 pages, so I felt like I wasn't getting to know any of the women, and there was a lot of talk about the actual science (which confused me) and the men involved, which wasn't what I was expecting based on everything I knew about this book. I read it all and pretty quickly but pretty disappointed.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Ellie

    3.5 RTC

  9. 4 out of 5

    CCPL Buzz

    MT

  10. 5 out of 5

    S.M. Ababil Islam

  11. 5 out of 5

    Ragras

  12. 4 out of 5

    Aaa

  13. 4 out of 5

    Annika Sharma

  14. 4 out of 5

    Данил

  15. 4 out of 5

    Kamden

  16. 5 out of 5

    Maura

  17. 5 out of 5

    Prashi Doval

  18. 5 out of 5

    Kholoud

  19. 4 out of 5

    Kristy

  20. 4 out of 5

    Rachel Sharpe

  21. 5 out of 5

    Angela

  22. 4 out of 5

    Julie

  23. 4 out of 5

    Merricat

  24. 5 out of 5

    Barbara Anthony

  25. 5 out of 5

    Little, Brown Young Readers

  26. 4 out of 5

    Lira

  27. 4 out of 5

    Katie Ganem

  28. 4 out of 5

    NatalieD.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Melissa Lynn

  30. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Gross

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