counter create hit Memes to Movements: How the World's Most Viral Media Is Changing Social Protest and Power - Download Free eBook
Hot Best Seller

Memes to Movements: How the World's Most Viral Media Is Changing Social Protest and Power

Availability: Ready to download

A global exploration of internet memes as agents of pop culture, politics, protest, and propaganda on- and offline, and how they will save or destroy us all. Memes are the street art of the social web. Using social media-driven movements as her guide, technologist and digital media scholar An Xiao Mina unpacks the mechanics of memes and how they operate to reinforce, amplif A global exploration of internet memes as agents of pop culture, politics, protest, and propaganda on- and offline, and how they will save or destroy us all. Memes are the street art of the social web. Using social media-driven movements as her guide, technologist and digital media scholar An Xiao Mina unpacks the mechanics of memes and how they operate to reinforce, amplify, and shape today's politics. She finds that the "silly" stuff of meme culture--the photo remixes, the selfies, the YouTube songs, and the pun-tastic hashtags--are fundamentally intertwined with how we find and affirm one another, direct attention to human rights and social justice issues, build narratives, and make culture. Mina finds parallels, for example, between a photo of Black Lives Matter protestors in Ferguson, Missouri, raising their hands in a gesture of resistance and one from eight thousand miles away, in Hong Kong, of Umbrella Movement activists raising yellow umbrellas as they fight for voting rights. She shows how a viral video of then presidential nominee Donald Trump laid the groundwork for pink pussyhats, a meme come to life as the widely recognized symbol for the international Women's March. Crucially, Mina reveals how, in parts of the world where public dissent is downright dangerous, memes can belie contentious political opinions that would incur drastic consequences if expressed outright. Activists in China evade censorship by critiquing their government with grass mud horse pictures online. Meanwhile, governments and hate groups are also beginning to utilize memes to spread propaganda, xenophobia, and misinformation. Botnets and state-sponsored agents spread them to confuse and distract internet communities. On the long, winding road from innocuous cat photos, internet memes have become a central practice for political contention and civic engagement. Memes to Movements unveils the transformative power of memes, for better and for worse. At a time when our movements are growing more complex and open-ended--when governments are learning to wield the internet as effectively as protestors--Mina brings a fresh and sharply innovative take to the media discourse.


Compare

A global exploration of internet memes as agents of pop culture, politics, protest, and propaganda on- and offline, and how they will save or destroy us all. Memes are the street art of the social web. Using social media-driven movements as her guide, technologist and digital media scholar An Xiao Mina unpacks the mechanics of memes and how they operate to reinforce, amplif A global exploration of internet memes as agents of pop culture, politics, protest, and propaganda on- and offline, and how they will save or destroy us all. Memes are the street art of the social web. Using social media-driven movements as her guide, technologist and digital media scholar An Xiao Mina unpacks the mechanics of memes and how they operate to reinforce, amplify, and shape today's politics. She finds that the "silly" stuff of meme culture--the photo remixes, the selfies, the YouTube songs, and the pun-tastic hashtags--are fundamentally intertwined with how we find and affirm one another, direct attention to human rights and social justice issues, build narratives, and make culture. Mina finds parallels, for example, between a photo of Black Lives Matter protestors in Ferguson, Missouri, raising their hands in a gesture of resistance and one from eight thousand miles away, in Hong Kong, of Umbrella Movement activists raising yellow umbrellas as they fight for voting rights. She shows how a viral video of then presidential nominee Donald Trump laid the groundwork for pink pussyhats, a meme come to life as the widely recognized symbol for the international Women's March. Crucially, Mina reveals how, in parts of the world where public dissent is downright dangerous, memes can belie contentious political opinions that would incur drastic consequences if expressed outright. Activists in China evade censorship by critiquing their government with grass mud horse pictures online. Meanwhile, governments and hate groups are also beginning to utilize memes to spread propaganda, xenophobia, and misinformation. Botnets and state-sponsored agents spread them to confuse and distract internet communities. On the long, winding road from innocuous cat photos, internet memes have become a central practice for political contention and civic engagement. Memes to Movements unveils the transformative power of memes, for better and for worse. At a time when our movements are growing more complex and open-ended--when governments are learning to wield the internet as effectively as protestors--Mina brings a fresh and sharply innovative take to the media discourse.

30 review for Memes to Movements: How the World's Most Viral Media Is Changing Social Protest and Power

  1. 5 out of 5

    Nenia ✨️ I yeet my books back and forth ✨️ Campbell

    Instagram || Twitter || Facebook || Amazon || Pinterest MEMES TO MOVEMENTS is a really interesting book about how memes, and their highly transmittable and salient nature, are effecting political movements and social change. An Xiao Mina presents a variety of memes and hashtags that have been part of huge political movements, including #BlackLivesMatter and #MAGA, discussing their origin when possible, why they're important, and also why memes are so effective in gaining stream and becoming Instagram || Twitter || Facebook || Amazon || Pinterest MEMES TO MOVEMENTS is a really interesting book about how memes, and their highly transmittable and salient nature, are effecting political movements and social change. An Xiao Mina presents a variety of memes and hashtags that have been part of huge political movements, including #BlackLivesMatter and #MAGA, discussing their origin when possible, why they're important, and also why memes are so effective in gaining stream and becoming viral. The author focuses primarily on American and Chinese memes, and to be honest, while I was expecting to be completely lost, I actually ended up enjoying the sections about Chinese memes the most. Two of the most interesting were the Umbrella Movement and the Grass Mud Horse. Because of censorship in China, it can be difficult for protesters to even break through China's firewall, so they have become really sneaky, using characters that are phonemes when pronounced (but contain different tones) or characters that resemble other characters. I had no idea how much subterfuge went on to get a revolutionary Chinese meme off the ground, and it really made me appreciate the cleverness and determination of the people involved in these political movements. Regarding the U.S. memes, they were more familiar to me, although some of them were still so recent as to be painful. The easiest chapter to read is the one about LOLcats and animal memes. Harder to read are the ones about how the alt-right embraces memes to spread their message and basically sow chaos, and the ones that call attention to the racial injustice that is far too prevalent to this day. I thought the author did a really good job trying to be objective when writing about such sensitive topics, which is definitely not an easy task in this day an age. I liked the pixel art on each new chapter, but I really, really wish this book had come with illustrations. Maybe they were concerned about copyright issues, or including the pictures would have made this book too expensive for its budget, but I would have really enjoyed seeing illustrations of some of these memes instead of continually having to look up the ones that weren't familiar. Overall, though, MEMES TO MOVEMENTS is a fascinating book and I think anyone who is interested in online politics should read it, because it does a great job talking about people becoming mobilized on social media and how they create and appropriate symbols and hashtags to give their movements more steam. Thanks to the publisher for sending me a copy in exchange for an honest review!  4 stars

  2. 5 out of 5

    Kevin Hodgson

    This is a fascinating and readable look at memes as connected to social movements, with clear ideas that one (memes) does not create the other but works hand in hand. Or can. Also explored us how authoritarian governments use memes and media for their own purpose, and it's not a stretch to see how Trump is doing the same. This is a fascinating and readable look at memes as connected to social movements, with clear ideas that one (memes) does not create the other but works hand in hand. Or can. Also explored us how authoritarian governments use memes and media for their own purpose, and it's not a stretch to see how Trump is doing the same.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Zara Rahman

    Fascinating analysis written in an accessible and thoughtful way. The book covers a vast range of topics, and touches on political moments and cultures from many areas of the world in a nuanced way. It’s beautifully written, too, and provides insights that will be invaluable to help us all understand social media, visual culture and the impact on our political climate.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Dana

    When I think of internet memes it’s silly ones like the nope octopus or lolcats that immediately come to mind, so I was intrigued by the idea that they are becoming a serious and powerful driving force behind social movements. This book explores how they are remixed and transformed, how they foster narrative building and cultural shifts, how they mirror, reflect, amplify and distort culture, and how they move from the digital world to the physical world. I never paid memes much attention before When I think of internet memes it’s silly ones like the nope octopus or lolcats that immediately come to mind, so I was intrigued by the idea that they are becoming a serious and powerful driving force behind social movements. This book explores how they are remixed and transformed, how they foster narrative building and cultural shifts, how they mirror, reflect, amplify and distort culture, and how they move from the digital world to the physical world. I never paid memes much attention before but will from now on! I was familiar with most of the American memes so it was interesting to read about their origins and effects, as well as to learn about memes from other countries (China, Mexico, Uganda, etc.) that were new to me. It was also interesting to learn about the various forms internet memes take. I was surprised that, despite being about a visual subject, this book included no images. On the one hand, the memes were well described and are easy enough to google if needed. On the other hand, many people (like me) read physical books in order to take a break from screens, so including some images would have been convenient and appreciated. The one bad part of the book was the coverage of the “Hands up! Don’t Shoot!” (and #BlackLivesMatter) memes inspired by the death of Michael Brown. The author says they “echoed early testimony that had suggested Brown had died with his hands up” (pg 81). Witnesses did say that, but those witnesses ultimately admitted to lying and the officer was found to be justified in defending himself. At first I figured the point of the book is how memes push social movements, so going into the details of how a specific meme was built on lies might have been a digression. But a later chapter focuses on memes founded on falsehoods that spread misinformation, so why wasn’t the Brown story brought up again there? Social injustices deserve attention, but it’s also an injustice to ignore when deceptions are used to fuel protests. Perhaps this rush to blindly ignite outrage is why Jussie Smollett thought he could get away with staging a hate crime recently? Other than that it was a good book, so I would recommend it albeit with reservations that the book may have some glaring omissions as far as historical fact goes. (Please note that I received a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.)

  5. 5 out of 5

    Alexander Smith

    There are only a few books that so directly cut to the core of what memes are about. First is _This is Why We Can't Have Nice Things_ by Dr. Phillips, Shifman's definitional text _Memes In Digital Culture_, and then Dr. Phillip's student and co-author Dr. Milner's _The World Made a Meme_. Although many of these texts hint at various common themes, this book does two things directly that most books on memes and memetic new media do not. Firstly, it is the first text that regularly distinguishes b There are only a few books that so directly cut to the core of what memes are about. First is _This is Why We Can't Have Nice Things_ by Dr. Phillips, Shifman's definitional text _Memes In Digital Culture_, and then Dr. Phillip's student and co-author Dr. Milner's _The World Made a Meme_. Although many of these texts hint at various common themes, this book does two things directly that most books on memes and memetic new media do not. Firstly, it is the first text that regularly distinguishes between the technology of signs and political iconography, and the protocols and power affiliated with social movements. Many books, articles, and presentations on memes (by Shifman's definition) confuse these two things in their analysis. Secondly, this book spends a great deal of time showing how memes function, and how they develop alternative framings of political and social issues and functions that counter what historic geo-governances tend to orient under. This is an essential read for anyone interested in 21st century counter-cultures, activism, or memetic work. There are a few things, as with any book, I find troubling. First, this book sub-titularly mentions "virality" but never justifies what that is. Virality almost has nothing to do with this book explicitly. Secondly, a case could be made for arguing that much of this is a one-sided metaphor. There are little to no arguments for how establishment institutions are finding these kinds of media easy/difficult to control... but this book's primary argument is that memes are "seeds" of progression and change in culture. Although occasionally such mentions of institutions are made implicitly, but only in the context of a success of a movement. It would have been interesting to see cases where governments or companies attempted to control memetic narrative and an explanation of success or failure.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Sabrina

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. “Can the Internet lead to positive social change or simply encourage peoples worst appetites for narcissism isolationism, polarization, of hate and propaganda?” Photo remixes, selfies, YouTube songs, hashtags jokes- How the silly and serious are deeply intertwined Meme- a unit of culture. coined by Richard Dawkins 1978 work the selfish Gene. His worked sparked field of memetics. Basic human cultural practices spread like biological genes Really informative & thought provoking. Protests & countermovem “Can the Internet lead to positive social change or simply encourage peoples worst appetites for narcissism isolationism, polarization, of hate and propaganda?” Photo remixes, selfies, YouTube songs, hashtags jokes- How the silly and serious are deeply intertwined Meme- a unit of culture. coined by Richard Dawkins 1978 work the selfish Gene. His worked sparked field of memetics. Basic human cultural practices spread like biological genes Really informative & thought provoking. Protests & countermovements such as The hoodie that sparked a movement (Trayvon Martin) Hands up, Umbrellas up, Michael Brown & Hong Kong universal suffrage. How Contemporary disinformation attempts to do at least two things: (1) overwhelm people with a series of conflicting and confusing narratives such that they give up trying to make sense of it all, and (2) string along those who do sincerely believe the story, and recruit them in amplifying the disinformation. Selfies & # create a sense of co-presence Pieces of content that travel from person to person and change along the way. Sharing & creating were different means to the same end. Making meaningful connections with others. Break pluralistic ignorance Synchronization of opinion Slacktivism “Messages repeated, thereby reinforced, quite frequently & the narrative changes.” Profile photo tactic Microaffirmation Microaggressions Censorship is designed to keep communities in the dark about what they might collectively believe. By stamping out public expression, authorities ensure that people remain in a state of ignorance, receiving only a singular view The great firewall of China GFW Hashtag - digital public assembly Social media- an addictive form of self affirmation Milieu- persons social environment “Shit-posting” - intending to derail conversations & meming Trump to victory. Alt-right called it meme magic New political environment called Dissensus Networked authoritarianism China implemented a system that tracks online activity & ties it to offline consequences No clear lines leads to fear & self censorship The potential of the images circulating online is that they can easily be Memed into messages that amplify these images and draw attention to critical social issues. The risk of images circulating online is if they can so easily be Memed into the messages that amplify a counter message. Narratives & counternarratives can have lasting effects as they influence media & legislation. Memes that play a role in advocacy or expression of social issue or policy change simple functional definition: I think of Internet Memes as digital objects that are remixed, transformed, and shared both in digital and physical space and a community Memes are like mirrors, reflecting, amplifying, and distorting culture Just because people are paying attention and hearing the narrative you are generating doesn’t mean they come to the same conclusions. Human believe has a much deeper core, influenced by cultural upbringing, family conversations, religious background, and other factors.s The narrative capacity of Memes in particular can be a matter of concern: the easy ability to create and test different Memes means that governments can create multiple narratives, thereby spreading alternative narratives or exhausting people about the source of trust and truth. Opposition groups can Remax an existing narrative for their own purposes and transform that into a larger counter story.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    If you are unfamiliar with the memes and movements mentioned in this book, it will be a useful primer. Even if you are fairly knowledgeable regarding its material, there is a value in the way the book provides a mosaic of global movements that is useful in thinking relationally to one another. Essentially, the book is a plot summary of other people's ideas regarding memes, and Mina is there to familiarize readers with this work. Although I conduct a bit of research on this area, I found some use If you are unfamiliar with the memes and movements mentioned in this book, it will be a useful primer. Even if you are fairly knowledgeable regarding its material, there is a value in the way the book provides a mosaic of global movements that is useful in thinking relationally to one another. Essentially, the book is a plot summary of other people's ideas regarding memes, and Mina is there to familiarize readers with this work. Although I conduct a bit of research on this area, I found some useful sources because of the book. By its end, I found the book a bit monotonous in that it offered interesting new examples but the core ideas had been largely exhausted midway into the book. The writing is okay, spreading bland, friendly tone of much popular writing that you can't help but feel secretly considers you slightly dumber than you are. Most troubling are the moments when the author's authoritative tone offers information that is somewhat murky. She writes, for example, "In 2005 linguist and cognitive scientist George Lakoff popularized the concept of framing in politics" (157). Well, it depends on what you mean by "popularized" and "politics." Sociology has a long tradition that predates this with the work of Todd Gitlin, David Snow, and others. Although Lakoff did popularize this notion to people outside of sociology and other academic fields, the concept long predated it. Another point: "As meme culture spills into the physical world, it becomes more difficult to say that something happening on the internet is just on the internet when in fact it could be happening culture in ways that are not immediately apparent . . . " (155). Sure, that is fair enough, but the statement assumes that there ever was a clear and easy divide between online and offline worlds, which is debatable. Even if we are talking about protest actions, they still depend on physical infrastructure, bodies behind keyboards, and the like. Yes, the lines might be blurring more than ever. but there were always bleeding together between these worlds. If anything, we need to draw our sites offscreen more often to explore how grounded much of this work is. I am not saying that Mina doesn't explore the relations between virtual and physical worlds throughout her book, but there are times when the writing can get slightly caught up in an ebullient frenzy about the power of memes that curdles one's critical faculties. These are all minor quips with a good basic primer about memes and movements. Overall, if you want to learn more in-depth about the subject, Mina provides a decent secondary bibliography to to pursue later.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Rama

    The Meme machine and the social media This book looks at media created by users of social media who express their emotions, feelings, thoughts, deeply-held beliefs; social and political, and the highs and lows of their lives. They bring a variety into the online world where they share, laugh and cry. The social media evolve continuously and educates us into socio-political movements. Photo-remixes, selfies, YouTube videos, hashtag-tweets, and all the silliness of meme culture. Sometimes the sill The Meme machine and the social media This book looks at media created by users of social media who express their emotions, feelings, thoughts, deeply-held beliefs; social and political, and the highs and lows of their lives. They bring a variety into the online world where they share, laugh and cry. The social media evolve continuously and educates us into socio-political movements. Photo-remixes, selfies, YouTube videos, hashtag-tweets, and all the silliness of meme culture. Sometimes the silly creations lead to social and political revolutions. This book is not about comprehensive history of memes in social movements nor is this a guide book to be creative online. The author explores the digital culture to illuminate broader-side social media. Memes are analogues to genes in that they self-replicate, mutate, and respond to selective pressures. They are a viral phenomenon that may evolve by natural selection in a manner analogous to that of biological evolution. That is through the processes of variation, mutation, competition, and inheritance, each of which influences a meme's reproductive success. This book is very enjoyable, and the author’s style of writing add an extra-dimension to the meme culture that has evolved. So, what is next? Perhaps a cloud feature where we can upload our thoughts and emotions in place of videos, music, pictures and emojis.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Guilherme Smee

    Memes to Movements: How the World's Most Viral Media Is Changing Social Protest and Power é um livro que promete muito, mas que entrega pouco. Principalmente nas descrições dos movimentos que ele planeja cobrir, que trata com muito mais na própria descrição do que ao trazer novas discussões para forma como memes e movimento sociais podem ser trabalhados. Ou seja, se não fosse pela prórpia ação dos memes já ocupando um lugar de comunicação e expressão a largo de nossa sociedade não teria nada de Memes to Movements: How the World's Most Viral Media Is Changing Social Protest and Power é um livro que promete muito, mas que entrega pouco. Principalmente nas descrições dos movimentos que ele planeja cobrir, que trata com muito mais na própria descrição do que ao trazer novas discussões para forma como memes e movimento sociais podem ser trabalhados. Ou seja, se não fosse pela prórpia ação dos memes já ocupando um lugar de comunicação e expressão a largo de nossa sociedade não teria nada de novo neste livro. Bem, talvez os melhores capítulos desta publicação sejam aqueles em que a autora faz dos memes que se utilizam de animais, como os mais conhecidos utilizando-se de gatinhos, mas também faslando sobre como cabras e assemlehados (e no Brasil, o Bode Manêro) tomaram de assalto a cultura. Contudo se você está procurando um livro que faça uma associação de memes e de contruções digitais com movimentos sociais, recomendo esquecer este livro aqui e procurar o livro El Ciberaconcimento, de Ronaldo Henn, esse sim, recheado de boas análises.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Kendra

    Disclosure: An is a friend and a colleague. This is an incredibly thoughtful, insightful book. An has done a fantastic job of connecting Chinese memes and experiences to ones that will be more familiar to US internet users, drawing out the ties between social movements and hashtags and jokes. One big frustration with the book was the lack of pictures - although she tries her best (and does a good job) at describing the various images, a book on the power of memes with no memes is...strange. It wa Disclosure: An is a friend and a colleague. This is an incredibly thoughtful, insightful book. An has done a fantastic job of connecting Chinese memes and experiences to ones that will be more familiar to US internet users, drawing out the ties between social movements and hashtags and jokes. One big frustration with the book was the lack of pictures - although she tries her best (and does a good job) at describing the various images, a book on the power of memes with no memes is...strange. It was also a bit weird to read cover-to-cover - I get the feeling that the chapters are more meant as stand alone documents, to be assigned separately. Nonetheless, Memes to Movements a solid introduction to the connection of online discourse to offline movements that has a thoughtfulness and global scope that many works in this area lack, and cites many seminal scholars for follow up reading.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Sharon

    The author does a decent job of offering some insight to how memes have moved from being fun to being utilized within politics. I liked being able to read about how memes are used in other countries other then the USA. I expected some examples as in images of these memes, not sure if there was a copy-write issue with that or not but I think seeing them would have been useful. It’s unfortunate that the author decided to utilize this book for their own political propaganda, and it seems clear they The author does a decent job of offering some insight to how memes have moved from being fun to being utilized within politics. I liked being able to read about how memes are used in other countries other then the USA. I expected some examples as in images of these memes, not sure if there was a copy-write issue with that or not but I think seeing them would have been useful. It’s unfortunate that the author decided to utilize this book for their own political propaganda, and it seems clear they are left leaning. It would have been so much better if it could have been neutral information and it’s such a pity that it’s so difficult to find anyone willing or capable of writing a book that is neutral and fair to both sides.

  12. 5 out of 5

    JP

    Even if you're already familiar with memes as a concept, this book will likely expand your understanding about what memes "do" for us and how they begin. It will definitely expand your appreciation for memes as an important and growing force across the world. If the strategy of using memes began among suppressed movements, Mina shows how authoritarian governments quickly became adept at using and diluting memes. Memes tend to travel on the most adored, familiar creatures common to their local cu Even if you're already familiar with memes as a concept, this book will likely expand your understanding about what memes "do" for us and how they begin. It will definitely expand your appreciation for memes as an important and growing force across the world. If the strategy of using memes began among suppressed movements, Mina shows how authoritarian governments quickly became adept at using and diluting memes. Memes tend to travel on the most adored, familiar creatures common to their local culture. Perhaps that phenomena means it will be hard for any one force to commandeer control over humanity's latest means of communicating.

  13. 4 out of 5

    eve massacre

    "Memes are the media through which we test and iterate and envision and contest the type of society we want to live in." In one moment you think "oh nice, a bit of light-footed information" - like OMG, cat historian and meme librarian are jobs that really exist! - and in the next you find yourself neck-deep in politics and meme theory. It is a really interesting qualitative look into participatory culture's and art's role for political and social movements today, and one that goes beyond US persp "Memes are the media through which we test and iterate and envision and contest the type of society we want to live in." In one moment you think "oh nice, a bit of light-footed information" - like OMG, cat historian and meme librarian are jobs that really exist! - and in the next you find yourself neck-deep in politics and meme theory. It is a really interesting qualitative look into participatory culture's and art's role for political and social movements today, and one that goes beyond US perspective: for example there are lots of observations from China's meme culture which I found a very interesting contrast and extension.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Richard

    Fascinating book on Memes and their social contexts - remixed, transformed and shared. What really surprised me was with the use of Memes in China - where Memes are used in puntastic ways, subverting English words with Chinese-sounding counterparts. Overall the book was informative and well-researched, although it comes from a fairly strong left-leaning bias in terms of its examples and study of Meme culture (sometimes it becomes a little preachy). Yet on the whole, it was fairly balanced and de Fascinating book on Memes and their social contexts - remixed, transformed and shared. What really surprised me was with the use of Memes in China - where Memes are used in puntastic ways, subverting English words with Chinese-sounding counterparts. Overall the book was informative and well-researched, although it comes from a fairly strong left-leaning bias in terms of its examples and study of Meme culture (sometimes it becomes a little preachy). Yet on the whole, it was fairly balanced and definitely helpful to understand the phenomenon. What a time to be alive!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Chelsea

    I got this as an advanced reader copy. This was not the book that I though it was going to be. It was a little dry, but I was able to get through it. I did want to read something outside of my normal, and this was it. It was interesting to see where certain memes came from and how much power they had to sway people into becoming social political movements. When you think something is just a funny gif or picture, sometimes there is a whole story behind it. I don't think I can look at certain meme I got this as an advanced reader copy. This was not the book that I though it was going to be. It was a little dry, but I was able to get through it. I did want to read something outside of my normal, and this was it. It was interesting to see where certain memes came from and how much power they had to sway people into becoming social political movements. When you think something is just a funny gif or picture, sometimes there is a whole story behind it. I don't think I can look at certain memes the same again.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jack Tomascak

    Mina's case studies on global applications of memes in cultural/social organizing are a breath of fresh air in a discourse too often focused on Western organizing not weakened by state-sanctioned Internet censorship. The book concludes with a terrific framework on identifying and qualifying visual, charismatic, and political features of memes that stands to be useful to anyone seeking to dig deeper into what makes certain memes develop traction on the internet and "IRL." Mina's case studies on global applications of memes in cultural/social organizing are a breath of fresh air in a discourse too often focused on Western organizing not weakened by state-sanctioned Internet censorship. The book concludes with a terrific framework on identifying and qualifying visual, charismatic, and political features of memes that stands to be useful to anyone seeking to dig deeper into what makes certain memes develop traction on the internet and "IRL."

  17. 4 out of 5

    Abby Kensky

    This book was a very interesting read. It wasn’t necessarily “captivating,” but it really made me think. I’d recommend this to anyone who is interested/involved in internet culture. The author did a great job of taking a global look at the topic, (focusing mainly on China & the US) helping to avoid the typical Eurocentric approach many non fiction authors take to sociological explorations such as this one.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Olivia Ambrose

    Super fascinating!!! An in-depth look at some of the world's memes and how they are shaping and affecting real social movement. From Black Lives Matter to the Yellow Umbrella movement, this is an extremely interesting analysis of how memes are shaped by culture and then go on to affect culture itself. Definitely worth checking out if you have any interest in memes, how internet culture and irl culture interact, and the way that the world functions in a digital age. Super fascinating!!! An in-depth look at some of the world's memes and how they are shaping and affecting real social movement. From Black Lives Matter to the Yellow Umbrella movement, this is an extremely interesting analysis of how memes are shaped by culture and then go on to affect culture itself. Definitely worth checking out if you have any interest in memes, how internet culture and irl culture interact, and the way that the world functions in a digital age.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Brandi

    Mina has written a thoughtful and thorough analysis of “meme culture” that explores the power of activism through the making and sharing of memes. Unfortunately, this was a much more academic take on the subject than I was looking for. The cover is somewhat misleading in my opinion, as I was expecting a book with color images of popular memes and more of an overview of social protest memes than an academic analysis of their creation and power. Well-written and important, just not for me.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jaclyn

    This book wasn't what I thought it would be like. Mina has done her research, and the book has many examples and facts to back up her claims. However, it was a bit dry for me, and I just couldn't get into it. I ended up abandoning it after a few chapters. *I received this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.* This book wasn't what I thought it would be like. Mina has done her research, and the book has many examples and facts to back up her claims. However, it was a bit dry for me, and I just couldn't get into it. I ended up abandoning it after a few chapters. *I received this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.*

  21. 5 out of 5

    James Sprinkle

    Memes are deceptively simple A book to address memes in our time can confuse old timers like me who use different terminology. Mina is a trendsetter who knows her subject well, however, and was able to keep my interest and give me a greater appreciation for what it is that makes memes matter in this age.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Caroline Carrico

    A very sound analysis of the ways in which memes impact, expand and influence social movements on both ends of the political spectrum. It’s an interesting book even if you aren’t a political scientist or a technologist.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Allen Carter

    This book was pretty cool, and as a rhetorician looking at social movements, this book has some pretty cutting edge perspectives of how memes and the study of memetics affects the political realm! I hope more books and studies like this keep coming out and going further in depth on the topic!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Geoff Walling

    I think it's more that I'm too old than the book is not all that interesting. I think it's more that I'm too old than the book is not all that interesting.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Seamus

    This has inspired me to write a paper on the way memes shape social movements and using Trayvon martin’s shooting as a case study.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jen

    I thoroughly enjoyed this book and the overview of memes and how they've affected not only our everyday life with technology but also how it has seeped into our political movements around the world. I thoroughly enjoyed this book and the overview of memes and how they've affected not only our everyday life with technology but also how it has seeped into our political movements around the world.

  27. 5 out of 5

    M.

    It was a good read.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Joyce

    Read this through my pandemic brain fog, but this was fascinating.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Toria

    Very interesting! I learned a lot of tidbits that will stick with me. Author clearly did the work to know what she's talking about. Very interesting! I learned a lot of tidbits that will stick with me. Author clearly did the work to know what she's talking about.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Megan Collins

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.