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Mental Health in Children and Young People: Spotting Symptoms and Seeking Help Early

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‘I’m worried that my child is depressed and anxious.’ ‘I’m worried that my child has an eating disorder.’ ‘I’m worried about drugs.’ Mental health difficulties affect about 1 in 10 children and young people, ranging from fears, phobias and panic attacks to obsessions, compulsions and even psychosis. Written by a specialist psychiatrist and packed with expert advice, this ‘I’m worried that my child is depressed and anxious.’ ‘I’m worried that my child has an eating disorder.’ ‘I’m worried about drugs.’ Mental health difficulties affect about 1 in 10 children and young people, ranging from fears, phobias and panic attacks to obsessions, compulsions and even psychosis. Written by a specialist psychiatrist and packed with expert advice, this comprehensive book highlights the often subtle warning signs of trouble and suggests tactful, effective ways to take action, whether your child is 6 or 16. An invaluable resource for parents, extended family, teachers, social workers, and anyone concerned about a young person’s emotional well-being. Topics include: when to worry communicating with your child – practical techniques bipolar disorder attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) autism trauma and grief bullying and abuse sleep and well-being help from your doctor red flags and managing emergencies Dr Sarah Vohra says, ‘Gut instinct is the most undervalued tool we own. Some parental anxiety is natural, but if you think something’s wrong, trust your instinct. Don’t ignore it or try to justify worrying behaviour as normal ups and downs. Early intervention is key – so talk to your child and seek professional help sooner rather than later.’


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‘I’m worried that my child is depressed and anxious.’ ‘I’m worried that my child has an eating disorder.’ ‘I’m worried about drugs.’ Mental health difficulties affect about 1 in 10 children and young people, ranging from fears, phobias and panic attacks to obsessions, compulsions and even psychosis. Written by a specialist psychiatrist and packed with expert advice, this ‘I’m worried that my child is depressed and anxious.’ ‘I’m worried that my child has an eating disorder.’ ‘I’m worried about drugs.’ Mental health difficulties affect about 1 in 10 children and young people, ranging from fears, phobias and panic attacks to obsessions, compulsions and even psychosis. Written by a specialist psychiatrist and packed with expert advice, this comprehensive book highlights the often subtle warning signs of trouble and suggests tactful, effective ways to take action, whether your child is 6 or 16. An invaluable resource for parents, extended family, teachers, social workers, and anyone concerned about a young person’s emotional well-being. Topics include: when to worry communicating with your child – practical techniques bipolar disorder attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) autism trauma and grief bullying and abuse sleep and well-being help from your doctor red flags and managing emergencies Dr Sarah Vohra says, ‘Gut instinct is the most undervalued tool we own. Some parental anxiety is natural, but if you think something’s wrong, trust your instinct. Don’t ignore it or try to justify worrying behaviour as normal ups and downs. Early intervention is key – so talk to your child and seek professional help sooner rather than later.’

33 review for Mental Health in Children and Young People: Spotting Symptoms and Seeking Help Early

  1. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    This is a very interesting overview over the most common mental health issues that parents might be confronted with while raising their children. I liked that checklists were included that could help parents to identify the issues their children might be facing. I also liked that the author did not encourage medication but instead relied on actually communicating with the children. Overall, I think that this might be a useful resource for parents worrying about the children's mental health. This is a very interesting overview over the most common mental health issues that parents might be confronted with while raising their children. I liked that checklists were included that could help parents to identify the issues their children might be facing. I also liked that the author did not encourage medication but instead relied on actually communicating with the children. Overall, I think that this might be a useful resource for parents worrying about the children's mental health.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Julia

  3. 5 out of 5

    Lorraine Stocks

  4. 4 out of 5

    Sharon Grimaldi

  5. 4 out of 5

    Fillyjonk

  6. 4 out of 5

    Sara-Jayne Tasmin

  7. 4 out of 5

    Brent van der Linde

  8. 5 out of 5

    Amy

  9. 5 out of 5

    Claire Rockss

  10. 4 out of 5

    Nicky

  11. 5 out of 5

    Bethan Thomas-williams

  12. 4 out of 5

    Sophiebeth

  13. 5 out of 5

    Sian

  14. 5 out of 5

    Emily Jones-Hewens

  15. 5 out of 5

    Ange

  16. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

  17. 4 out of 5

    Amukuti

  18. 4 out of 5

    Lea

  19. 5 out of 5

    Sandra Alexia

  20. 5 out of 5

    mary

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jay Anderson

  22. 5 out of 5

    Yasmine Dero

  23. 4 out of 5

    suzanne newson

  24. 4 out of 5

    Cha Rlene

  25. 5 out of 5

    Christabel Sansone

  26. 4 out of 5

    Kim

  27. 5 out of 5

    Lauren Hartley

  28. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca Pearce

  29. 4 out of 5

    Holly

  30. 4 out of 5

    Dani

  31. 5 out of 5

    Renee Brady

  32. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Zaidi

  33. 4 out of 5

    Amy

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