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Beatrice's Goat

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More than anything, Beatrice longs to be a schoolgirl. But in her small African village, only children who can afford uniforms and books can go to school. Beatrice knows that with six children to care for, her family is much too poor. But then Beatrice receives a wonderful gift from some people far away -- a goat! Fat and sleek as a ripe mango, Mugisa (which means "luck") More than anything, Beatrice longs to be a schoolgirl. But in her small African village, only children who can afford uniforms and books can go to school. Beatrice knows that with six children to care for, her family is much too poor. But then Beatrice receives a wonderful gift from some people far away -- a goat! Fat and sleek as a ripe mango, Mugisa (which means "luck") gives milk that Beatrice can sell. With Mugisa's help, it looks as if Beatrice's dream may come true after all. Page McBrier and Lori Lohstoeter beautifully recount this true story about how one child, given the right tools, is able to lift her family out of poverty. Thanks to Heifer Project International -- a charitable organization that donates livestock to poor communities around the world -- other families like Beatrice's will also have a chance to change their lives.


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More than anything, Beatrice longs to be a schoolgirl. But in her small African village, only children who can afford uniforms and books can go to school. Beatrice knows that with six children to care for, her family is much too poor. But then Beatrice receives a wonderful gift from some people far away -- a goat! Fat and sleek as a ripe mango, Mugisa (which means "luck") More than anything, Beatrice longs to be a schoolgirl. But in her small African village, only children who can afford uniforms and books can go to school. Beatrice knows that with six children to care for, her family is much too poor. But then Beatrice receives a wonderful gift from some people far away -- a goat! Fat and sleek as a ripe mango, Mugisa (which means "luck") gives milk that Beatrice can sell. With Mugisa's help, it looks as if Beatrice's dream may come true after all. Page McBrier and Lori Lohstoeter beautifully recount this true story about how one child, given the right tools, is able to lift her family out of poverty. Thanks to Heifer Project International -- a charitable organization that donates livestock to poor communities around the world -- other families like Beatrice's will also have a chance to change their lives.

30 review for Beatrice's Goat

  1. 5 out of 5

    Tisha

    A little girl named Beatrice lives with her Mama and younger siblings in a small village in Uganda. Being very poor, she cannot afford to go to school. But she really wants to! Then suddenly her dreams see lights when some people from a distant land gift her family a goat! Beatrice names the goat Mugisa which means luck and the story continues. Such a beautiful little book with some very detailed and stunning illustrations! Totally adored it! <3

  2. 4 out of 5

    Kathryn

    This is the story of how a young Ugandan girl named Beatrice is able to afford school after her family receives a goat from Heifer Project International, an organization that donates livestock to needy families in poor communities around the world so that they can have a new way of raising money that benefits not only themselves but their community. The story is told in an engaging way and, while perhaps my adult self would have liked a few more details, I think is perfect to share with young ch This is the story of how a young Ugandan girl named Beatrice is able to afford school after her family receives a goat from Heifer Project International, an organization that donates livestock to needy families in poor communities around the world so that they can have a new way of raising money that benefits not only themselves but their community. The story is told in an engaging way and, while perhaps my adult self would have liked a few more details, I think is perfect to share with young children. I thought the illustrations were lovely, especially the one of the goat nuzzling lovingly against Beatrice. You could really see their bond and how the goat was not just something to make the family money but a beloved new member of their family. On a personal note, I couldn't help but feel troubled thinking of the goat's male offspring and the fate that most likely awaited him when he was sold. However, there is nothing hinted at in the story to indicate he would be killed (and perhaps he is not, I just know the females are wanted for milk) so it is still suitable for children. And, even as a vegan, I could not help but be touched at how much this family's life will improve even at the sacrifice of that sweet goat. I checked this out from the library, but for those interested in donations, 2% of the proceeds from purchasing the book go to Heifer Project International. There is another book from HPI, Faith the Cow, as well.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Krista the Krazy Kataloguer

    In this story, a Ugandan girl's family receives a goat through a program from another country. The goat gives the family milk to drink and to sell, and thereby improve their lives. This story is based on a real program, described by Hillary Clinton in an afterword to the story. This is an example, similar to recent picture books about Wangari Maathai and her tree planting campaign, of how one small thing can lead to big changes for the better in the poor people's lives, if they use that small th In this story, a Ugandan girl's family receives a goat through a program from another country. The goat gives the family milk to drink and to sell, and thereby improve their lives. This story is based on a real program, described by Hillary Clinton in an afterword to the story. This is an example, similar to recent picture books about Wangari Maathai and her tree planting campaign, of how one small thing can lead to big changes for the better in the poor people's lives, if they use that small thing to best advantage. I enjoyed the colorful pictures, especially those of the cute goat and how she nuzzles and interacts with her owner, Beatrice. Recommended for old and young alike.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    So if you're looking for a book about Heifer International, this is a great title. The artwork is lovely, the text is simple to follow, and readers can see how children in developing countries live. Hillary Rodham Clinton wrote the afterward and explains Heifer International's long role in aiding developing nations. That being said, the story is really simple. Solving problems in developing nations is not as simple as sending a pregnant goat to a family. If you are doing a Heifer project at your So if you're looking for a book about Heifer International, this is a great title. The artwork is lovely, the text is simple to follow, and readers can see how children in developing countries live. Hillary Rodham Clinton wrote the afterward and explains Heifer International's long role in aiding developing nations. That being said, the story is really simple. Solving problems in developing nations is not as simple as sending a pregnant goat to a family. If you are doing a Heifer project at your school, this is a good resource for kindergarten - second grade. Older students will need a story that is more advanced and nuanced.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Zielske

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. "Beatrice's Goat" is a wonderful story about a girl whose family in Uganda benefits from receiving a goat via Heifer International. More than just another story about charitable giving, it gets into the care that Beatrice and her family give to raising the goat as well as to Beatrice achieving her dream of being able to attend school. "Beatrice's Goat" is a wonderful story about a girl whose family in Uganda benefits from receiving a goat via Heifer International. More than just another story about charitable giving, it gets into the care that Beatrice and her family give to raising the goat as well as to Beatrice achieving her dream of being able to attend school.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Abigail

    Based on the true story of a young Ugandan girl named Beatrice, whose family are too poor to send her to school, Beatrice's Goat highlights the transformation that a seemingly simple change - in this case, the addition of a goat to a poor rural household - can effect in the lives of those involved. After her family is given a goat by Heifer International (not named in the narrative, but described by Beatrice's mother as "some kindhearted people from far away"), Beatrice finds that she must work Based on the true story of a young Ugandan girl named Beatrice, whose family are too poor to send her to school, Beatrice's Goat highlights the transformation that a seemingly simple change - in this case, the addition of a goat to a poor rural household - can effect in the lives of those involved. After her family is given a goat by Heifer International (not named in the narrative, but described by Beatrice's mother as "some kindhearted people from far away"), Beatrice finds that she must work even harder, taking care of Mugisa (meaning "lucky") and selling her milk. But the extra effort pays off when Beatrice's mother tells her what the family intends to do with the extra income... I don't think I would have heard of Beatrice's Goat, were it not for the review of an online friend, so my thanks to Krista! The story itself is fairly straightforward, engaging (although not especially brilliant) with a good message about small changes making a big difference. That message is further reinforced by Hilary Rodham Clinton's brief afterword, in which she discusses Heifer International. The accompanying acrylic artwork by Lori Lohstoeter is similarly engaging. All in all, this is an appealing book that will gently expose young readers to some un-gentle realities about poverty in our world, and some steps that are being taken to try to address those realities on the ground.

  7. 5 out of 5

    sarafem

    I read this book awhile ago when I worked with the Heifer Project; this book is basically promotional material for their work. The Heifer Project provides income-producing animals to impoverished people so that they may earn a living; the idea is that while they are bettering themselves, their animals are producing offspring that they in turn give to other needy members of the community. Soon there is a whole freakin' village of cows or goats or lions or tigers or bears oh my all from one that w I read this book awhile ago when I worked with the Heifer Project; this book is basically promotional material for their work. The Heifer Project provides income-producing animals to impoverished people so that they may earn a living; the idea is that while they are bettering themselves, their animals are producing offspring that they in turn give to other needy members of the community. Soon there is a whole freakin' village of cows or goats or lions or tigers or bears oh my all from one that was provided by the good folks at the Heifer Project. This book shows us one example in a young girl named Beatrice; if my memory serves correctly she is in Uganda. The Heifer Project provides her family with, well, a goat obviously, and the goat provides milk to feed the family and enough to sell as well. With the income this provides, the family is able to get a new house and Beatrice fulfills her dream of going to school. The Heifer Project is a wonderful organization that does more hands-on work in communities than I think I have ever witnessed in a group I have been involved in. For more info go to http://www.heifer.org; you can donate just a few dollars for projects from chicks and bees to cows and llamas or a whole freakin' ark of animals, or you can just buy this book and the other Heifer book, Faith the Cow. A portion of the publisher's proceeds goes back to Heifer no matter where you buy the book, but I believe if you buy it straight from Heifer they get an even larger amount. Even if you can't spare anything, just spreading the word about this great organization is enough. They work all over the world, including in the United States.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jean Marie

    This book would be a great story for 7-8 year olds. This is the story of Beatrice, a wonderful girl who lives in a village in Uganda and the story of her receiving a goat to help her family make money. Beatrice has one goal in mind for herself and one thing she longs for, to go to school. A wonderful family donates money in order for Beatrice and her family to receive a goat. Beatrice sells her goat's milk and eventually saves up enough money to go to school. Beatrice is beyond excited and cann This book would be a great story for 7-8 year olds. This is the story of Beatrice, a wonderful girl who lives in a village in Uganda and the story of her receiving a goat to help her family make money. Beatrice has one goal in mind for herself and one thing she longs for, to go to school. A wonderful family donates money in order for Beatrice and her family to receive a goat. Beatrice sells her goat's milk and eventually saves up enough money to go to school. Beatrice is beyond excited and cannot wait to attend her first day of school. I think this is a great book because it documents the hard work and effort Beatrice and her family put into their every day lives which leads Beatrice to follow her dreams and attend school. It is also a great book for students to read about different lifestyles about a girl who lives in a community with no running water or electricity. It also shows how something such as school is taken for granted compared to other children out in the world. This is a great book to read and discuss with children. I remember reading a similar book when I was in the 3rd grade and how my class had the opportunity to donate money to an organization and help a family in need of an animal. This would be a great book to explain to children about hard work and effort put into taking care of a person's family, just as Beatrice did. This could be an opportunity to have everyone in the class bring in money and the class could help support a family in need. It is a great way to bond as a class and see where there money is going to and for supporting a good cause.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jane LoBosco

    Beatrice's Goat was a wonderful book with a great story about the trials and triumphs that a young girl in Uganda faces. I loved reading this book, and getting to see a whole other side to the world, and the way some people live. Living in poverty is a topic that is unfamiliar to many, and it is a good idea to learn about the way people across the world live. This story shows a very hardworking young girl, which is an important element to learn about as a young child. Beatrice is working hard so Beatrice's Goat was a wonderful book with a great story about the trials and triumphs that a young girl in Uganda faces. I loved reading this book, and getting to see a whole other side to the world, and the way some people live. Living in poverty is a topic that is unfamiliar to many, and it is a good idea to learn about the way people across the world live. This story shows a very hardworking young girl, which is an important element to learn about as a young child. Beatrice is working hard so she can attend school one day, something that we often take for granted. I believe that this story is so great for young children and adults alike because it teaches that responsibility and hard work pay off. I believe that the purpose of this book would be either as a read aloud or independent read at around 2nd or 3rd grade. As a read aloud, this book could be incorporated into a unit about families around the world, or something about Africa. As children, students really do not have a concept of other countries and how different they can be. This would be great to expose students to a different type of world, and also have them learn valuable lessons across the way. You could also teach how we can help out families in need, and give back to those who need it. As an independent read, students would be able to learn new vocabulary, and decipher the tricky words on their own. There are a lot of cultural words that students would love reading about on their own, and figuring out what they mean.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Dreamybee

    Heifer International is an organization that provides livestock and sustainable farming education to people in poverty-stricken areas. This book was written about Beatrice, a girl in Africa whose family received a goat from Heifer International, and how her life was changed by this gift. I really like the work that Hiefer does, and I really wanted to love this book, but I thought it was just OK. I guess I was hoping that it would be more of a springboard for Heifer International, but I don't thi Heifer International is an organization that provides livestock and sustainable farming education to people in poverty-stricken areas. This book was written about Beatrice, a girl in Africa whose family received a goat from Heifer International, and how her life was changed by this gift. I really like the work that Hiefer does, and I really wanted to love this book, but I thought it was just OK. I guess I was hoping that it would be more of a springboard for Heifer International, but I don't think the organization was even mentioned in the book except in the afterward by Hillary Clinton. I understand that the author probably didn't want it to read like propaganda either, but I wish she would have found a little better balance. I still think that this is a valuable book for introducing children to the idea of charitable giving and helping others. They can see how one act of kindness-a goat to one family-can help many people-other villagers who receive offspring from the goat as part of Heifer's Pass on the Gift policy. Part of the proceeds from the sale of this book are donated to Heifer International.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Mariah Schoenborn

    This excellently illustrated book features the true story of Beatrice, an impoverished Ugandan girl who longs to be a school girl but is unable to afford it. One day, their family receives a goat named Mugisa (which means "luck") and it changes everything. In this biography author Page McBrier does an excellent job. I can't wait to read this story aloud to my future students! It really makes a person feel lucky to live in a country where everyone has access to an education. This excellently illustrated book features the true story of Beatrice, an impoverished Ugandan girl who longs to be a school girl but is unable to afford it. One day, their family receives a goat named Mugisa (which means "luck") and it changes everything. In this biography author Page McBrier does an excellent job. I can't wait to read this story aloud to my future students! It really makes a person feel lucky to live in a country where everyone has access to an education.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Steph

    On a not-so great day I asked a librarian friend to recommend a "feel good" book. This is the book she handed me and it was an excellent suggestion as it is hard to imagine anyone closing the book without a smile on their face as Beatrice's dream comes true. I feel like this would be an excellent book to accompany a gift to a charitable donation for villages in third world nations in place of actual gifts for your child. Something along the lines of, "Johnny you have plenty of toys, so I bought On a not-so great day I asked a librarian friend to recommend a "feel good" book. This is the book she handed me and it was an excellent suggestion as it is hard to imagine anyone closing the book without a smile on their face as Beatrice's dream comes true. I feel like this would be an excellent book to accompany a gift to a charitable donation for villages in third world nations in place of actual gifts for your child. Something along the lines of, "Johnny you have plenty of toys, so I bought a goat for a family in Africa. I did buy you this book though to explain why this gift is so much more special than yet another toy for you." One of the most valuable 3 -5 minute reads you'll ever experience.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Genevieve Bomes

    A very inspirational story of how one little girl got a goat through Heifer Organization and her family benefited from it by her being able to go to school, fresh milk to drink and selling the kids to buy clothes, and other such things. A very touching and well written story.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jo

    Made this egocentric American grateful for the privileged life she has.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Sherry

    Heifer International is a nonprofit org. working to end hunger and poverty and save the earth through gifts of farm animals and training. Over the course of sixty years, Heifer has helped 4.5 million people striving for self-reliance in 128 countries, including the United States. The idea is simple, and it works. Instead of providing hungry families with a temporary source of food, Heifer Int. provides the "living loan" of an animal. A family's health and standard of living will be greatly impro Heifer International is a nonprofit org. working to end hunger and poverty and save the earth through gifts of farm animals and training. Over the course of sixty years, Heifer has helped 4.5 million people striving for self-reliance in 128 countries, including the United States. The idea is simple, and it works. Instead of providing hungry families with a temporary source of food, Heifer Int. provides the "living loan" of an animal. A family's health and standard of living will be greatly improved by what the animal can provide. This might be milk from a cow or goat, eggs from poultry, draft power from water buffalo or wool from llamas. Heifer also provides training in animal care and in farming methods that preserve the environment. Each family in turn passes on these gifts to another family in need, creating a chain of hope that lifts entire communities. To learn more, please visit www.heifer.org. Buying this book helps needy families. Hilary Rodham Clinton wrote an afterword for the book. This is the true story of Beatrice, eldest of six brothers and sisters who live with their mother in Kisinga, in the hills of western Uganda. The family received a goat from H.I., and Beatrice tended to it. They drank some goat milk, which improved their health. They sold the rest of the milk. The goat had twins, and they sold them, too. Beatrice was able to afford to go to school and the family got a new house with a tin roof. Story ends with B. telling a friend he is next in line to receive a goat. Vivid, dramatic paintings that close in on the faces, joy, and movement tell the tale in pictures. Picture book for 6-9 year-olds. Good for 2nd/3rd grade discussion.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Savannah

    I loved that we have helped the Heifer International Organization and that this is a true story about one such family. Heifer Organization is an organization that helps communities and families like Beatrice's in Uganda become resourceful. The goat provided nutrition, income, and came with knowledge of how to care for their gift without harming the environment. Heifer International is trying to help end hunger and poverty. There philosophy is "teach a man to fish". From the website: Heifer links co I loved that we have helped the Heifer International Organization and that this is a true story about one such family. Heifer Organization is an organization that helps communities and families like Beatrice's in Uganda become resourceful. The goat provided nutrition, income, and came with knowledge of how to care for their gift without harming the environment. Heifer International is trying to help end hunger and poverty. There philosophy is "teach a man to fish". From the website: Heifer links communities and helps brings sustainable agriculture and commerce to areas with a long history of poverty. Our animals provide partners with both food and reliable income, as agricultural products such as milk, eggs and honey can be traded or sold at market. The core of our model is Passing on the Gift. This means families share the training they receive, and pass on the first female offspring of their livestock to another family. This extends the impact of the original gift, allowing a once impoverished family to become donors and full participants in improving their communities. The goal of every Heifer project is to help families achieve self-reliance. We do this by providing them the tools they need to sustain themselves, and it's thanks to the generosity of donors like you. You have the power to give a hungry family the training it takes to feed themselves and their children; to give a young girl a chance at an education; to empower a woman to have a voice in her community. Together, we can change the world, one family, one community, at a time. And it all starts with a gift.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Lucia

    I read this book to my Daisy Girl Scout Troop for "World Thinking Day", the topic was "Together We Can Save Childrens' Lives". Teaching poverty, hunger and disease to upper middle class suburban first graders is a challenge. They not only have no concept that children around the world are dying from things they take for granted (lack of food, clean water and immunizations) , they have no concept that other people live in very drastically different environments. This book accurately portrays the I read this book to my Daisy Girl Scout Troop for "World Thinking Day", the topic was "Together We Can Save Childrens' Lives". Teaching poverty, hunger and disease to upper middle class suburban first graders is a challenge. They not only have no concept that children around the world are dying from things they take for granted (lack of food, clean water and immunizations) , they have no concept that other people live in very drastically different environments. This book accurately portrays the day-to-day life of a girl their own age in Uganda, where she dreams of going to school and having enough to eat (things they take for granted). Beatrice also works hard taking care of her siblings, working in the fields and helping to support her family, another very foreign concept. (They were amazed that people live in houses made of mud!). These topics are presented in a non-scary and enlightening manner and my girls were very interested and engaged in the story. I feel they learned a lot about the world and they seemed motivated to want to help. My own daughter asked to hear the story again at home.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Claudia

    (CIP) A young girl's dream of attending school in her small Ugandan village is fulfilled after her family is given an income-producing goat. Based on a true story about the work of Project Heifer. Though Beatrice spends her days working hard to help feed and care for her five siblings in a Ugandan village, she longs to go to school. When the family is given a pregnant goat through a community development project, the goat’s milk improves the children’s health and, over time, brings in enough mone (CIP) A young girl's dream of attending school in her small Ugandan village is fulfilled after her family is given an income-producing goat. Based on a true story about the work of Project Heifer. Though Beatrice spends her days working hard to help feed and care for her five siblings in a Ugandan village, she longs to go to school. When the family is given a pregnant goat through a community development project, the goat’s milk improves the children’s health and, over time, brings in enough money to send Beatrice to school, while the sale of one of the kids allows them to build a new house with a good steel roof. Beatrice and her family are portrayed with sympathy, while richly colored acrylic illustrations painted from a variety of perspectives complement and enrich the text. A Children’s African Book Award Honor Book. K-Gr 4. (SLJ) Favorably reviewed. (Africa Access) Highly recommended by Patricia Kuntz, a librarian and former African Studies Outreach Director at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, who has observed the Heifer Project in Africa.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth Smith

    McBrier, Page. Beatrice’s Goat. Illus. Lori Lohstoeter. New York: Atheneum Books for Young Readers,2001. Print. Heifer Project, Uganda. Beatrice’s Goat is based on a true story about a family in Uganda that received a goat as a gift. It explains how much of a blessing the goat is to the family, making it possible for them to provide for themselves. At the end of the story the family has raised enough money for Beatrice to go to school, which was the one thing that she wanted most in the world. T McBrier, Page. Beatrice’s Goat. Illus. Lori Lohstoeter. New York: Atheneum Books for Young Readers,2001. Print. Heifer Project, Uganda. Beatrice’s Goat is based on a true story about a family in Uganda that received a goat as a gift. It explains how much of a blessing the goat is to the family, making it possible for them to provide for themselves. At the end of the story the family has raised enough money for Beatrice to go to school, which was the one thing that she wanted most in the world. This book is amazing with its rich detailed artwork and interesting perspective given by both the author and the illustrator. It also does a fantastic job of showing and explaining to readers what life is like for people in other countries, specifically Africa. If I were to integrate this book into my classroom I would create a Social Studies lesson for third graders and teach them what life is like for people in Uganda. I also think this book would promote a great discussion on how fortunate we are in America to have so much that others work so hard for.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Ellen

    Beatrice is a little girl in East Africa that is able to attend school and is well nourished. However, it was not always like that. The gift of goat had changed her life forever. Unlike the other books that I have included in my text set, this book allows for students to see the receiver of the gift's perspective. The gift of a goat, while it may seem unusual to us, as well as Beatrice in the story, we can see the big impact the goat had on her life. One goat made a difference in her life. She i Beatrice is a little girl in East Africa that is able to attend school and is well nourished. However, it was not always like that. The gift of goat had changed her life forever. Unlike the other books that I have included in my text set, this book allows for students to see the receiver of the gift's perspective. The gift of a goat, while it may seem unusual to us, as well as Beatrice in the story, we can see the big impact the goat had on her life. One goat made a difference in her life. She is now able to go to school and her family is healthier because of the milk the goats produce. The story of Beatrice's Goat allows for students to see that there are ways for us to even help people around the world. While as a class we may not be able to afford to send a goat to East Africa, we can do a fund raiser as a class to give to the Heifer International organization. There are indirect ways to help people abroad, and we contribute as best as we can.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Kari

    To some families, a goat is the difference between poverty and richness. This book is based on the true story of a Ugandan girl named Beatrice and her goat Mugisa. Beatrice longs to go to school, but the expenses for books and a uniform are too great. She also has to stay and take care of her siblings. Beatrice’s mother tells her that they have been selected to receive a goat which will help their family greatly. After selling her beloved Mugisa’s milk for quite some time, there is enough money To some families, a goat is the difference between poverty and richness. This book is based on the true story of a Ugandan girl named Beatrice and her goat Mugisa. Beatrice longs to go to school, but the expenses for books and a uniform are too great. She also has to stay and take care of her siblings. Beatrice’s mother tells her that they have been selected to receive a goat which will help their family greatly. After selling her beloved Mugisa’s milk for quite some time, there is enough money for Beatrice to attend school. The illustrations beautifully depict the African landscape and bring the characters to life with feeling. The afterward mentions that the author and illustrator were invited to East Africa to do research for this book. Through Heifer Project International, Beatrice’s family and many others alike are able to reap the benefits depicted in the story.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Hannah Deremo

    This book is an inspirational story about Beatrice's family. They are living in Africa and one day receive a goat. The mother tells Beatrice to take care of the goat because the goat will bring great things. At first Beatrice doesn't understand, all she wants to do is go to school. Little does she realize that the goat will enable her to go to school. This is a true story and Beatrice has even done some interviews on TV. We used it this year in my classroom to do a close read. We connected it to This book is an inspirational story about Beatrice's family. They are living in Africa and one day receive a goat. The mother tells Beatrice to take care of the goat because the goat will bring great things. At first Beatrice doesn't understand, all she wants to do is go to school. Little does she realize that the goat will enable her to go to school. This is a true story and Beatrice has even done some interviews on TV. We used it this year in my classroom to do a close read. We connected it to our social studies unit of needs and wants. I definitely see myself continuing to use this story in my classroom because it opened up the children's eyes to another culture. It also helped distinguish true needs in someone's life and how those needs can vary in different parts of the world and cultures.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Najat Ahdaya

    This is a story about a young girl named Beatrice and her family including 5 siblings. In a small African village in Western Uganda, Beatrice an her family will soon find out they will be one of 12 families that will be given a goat. Little does Beatrice know, this goat will be the reason her dreams of going to school will come true. This book teaches hard work and preservation. We see this family grow as a result of an organization that gives livestock to families all across the world. In this This is a story about a young girl named Beatrice and her family including 5 siblings. In a small African village in Western Uganda, Beatrice an her family will soon find out they will be one of 12 families that will be given a goat. Little does Beatrice know, this goat will be the reason her dreams of going to school will come true. This book teaches hard work and preservation. We see this family grow as a result of an organization that gives livestock to families all across the world. In this case, Beatrice and her family were lucky enough to receive a goat and bring themselves out of poverty, "Beatrice lives here with her mother and five younger brothers and sisters in a sturdy mud house with a fine steel roof. The house is new. So is the shiny blue wooden furniture inside. In fact, many things are new to Beatrice and her family lately" (p. 1).

  24. 5 out of 5

    Carolina Musawwir

    Beatrice's Goat is an uplifting story of a family in Uganda who because of a goat, now sees the prospect of a better future. The goat was given to the family through the Heifer organization which allows families to gift others a "living loan" of an animal which they can use to improve their situations. I recently received their catalog in the mail, and I think their program would be a great way to teach students about world issues, empathy and kindness. This book would be a great introduction to Beatrice's Goat is an uplifting story of a family in Uganda who because of a goat, now sees the prospect of a better future. The goat was given to the family through the Heifer organization which allows families to gift others a "living loan" of an animal which they can use to improve their situations. I recently received their catalog in the mail, and I think their program would be a great way to teach students about world issues, empathy and kindness. This book would be a great introduction to such a fundraising activity (great to do before the Holidays) or it could just be used as a social justice read aloud. I recommend this book for K-5, although because of its length it might need to be read over a few days for the younger grades. This is Realistic Fiction, and it has an afterword by Hillary Rodham Clinton

  25. 4 out of 5

    Amy A.

    This is based on a true story of a young girl in Uganda who dreams of having enough money to go to school. She needs money for books and a uniform and her family barely has enough food to eat. Her mother tells her that her family has been given the gift of a goat. At first, Beatrice thinks this is odd but soon she and her siblings are drinking the goat's milk and growing stronger. Also, Beatrice sells the goat's milk everyday and eventually her mother tells her that she has enough money to to go This is based on a true story of a young girl in Uganda who dreams of having enough money to go to school. She needs money for books and a uniform and her family barely has enough food to eat. Her mother tells her that her family has been given the gift of a goat. At first, Beatrice thinks this is odd but soon she and her siblings are drinking the goat's milk and growing stronger. Also, Beatrice sells the goat's milk everyday and eventually her mother tells her that she has enough money to to go school! Also, they decide to sell one of the goat's babies and are able to build a new house with a stronger roof to keep her family dry. Beatrice realizes how important the gift of the goat was to her family and how much of an impact it had on the lives of her family.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Linda

    Published by the Heifer Project, this story is about a real nine-year-old girl from Uganda. She yearns to be able to attend her local school, even standing near the school as the students gather in a group and pretending she is one of them. How much our children in America take for granted! The story tells of the amazing arrival of a goat to this family, but first they must prepare a shed and begin growing the food it will eat. The goat arrives and is named “Mugisa”, meaning “luck”. And as the Published by the Heifer Project, this story is about a real nine-year-old girl from Uganda. She yearns to be able to attend her local school, even standing near the school as the students gather in a group and pretending she is one of them. How much our children in America take for granted! The story tells of the amazing arrival of a goat to this family, but first they must prepare a shed and begin growing the food it will eat. The goat arrives and is named “Mugisa”, meaning “luck”. And as the story grows, luck also does in the form of twin kids, which mean more prosperity for the family, all from a donation of one goat. The story is one of many that The Heifer Project shares, and this time in a beautifully illustrated picture book.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Beth

    Beatrice's Goat is the story of a young Ugandan girl whose family receives a goat through Heifer International for their sustenance and income. Because Beatrice's family is now receiving an income, they can afford to send her to school. The illustrations in this story are exquisite and really help you to feel like you're a part of Beatrice's family. This would be a fantastic read-aloud to help spark discussion about what a privilege it is to attend school and how there are actually kids all over Beatrice's Goat is the story of a young Ugandan girl whose family receives a goat through Heifer International for their sustenance and income. Because Beatrice's family is now receiving an income, they can afford to send her to school. The illustrations in this story are exquisite and really help you to feel like you're a part of Beatrice's family. This would be a fantastic read-aloud to help spark discussion about what a privilege it is to attend school and how there are actually kids all over the world who long to go to school because they don't have the same opportunities that we have in the U.S.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    A sweet story with beautiful illustrations. As another reviewer commented, the text is straightforward and engaging, if not brilliant. The illustrations definitely raise the whole book up a notch. The facial expressions are wonderful (poor ones in picture books are a pet peeve of mine!). If your child or classroom or Sunday school class or scout troop or whatever is participating in a Heifer International drive, I highly recommend this book as an introduction to young children. (Note: I received A sweet story with beautiful illustrations. As another reviewer commented, the text is straightforward and engaging, if not brilliant. The illustrations definitely raise the whole book up a notch. The facial expressions are wonderful (poor ones in picture books are a pet peeve of mine!). If your child or classroom or Sunday school class or scout troop or whatever is participating in a Heifer International drive, I highly recommend this book as an introduction to young children. (Note: I received a free copy of this book from the publisher at an American Library Association Annual Conference. I was not required to write a positive review. Thank you, Simon & Schuster!)

  29. 5 out of 5

    polly

    The sentiment behind this book is great--encouraging us to give to others, social justice, awareness of human need in developing countries, etc. The story itself is just so dull that whenever my son trots over to me with it I heave an internal sigh. It is too wordy in the wrong spots and not wordy enough in others, and the language plods along in an exhausting fashion. The illustrations are engaging, and the *idea* of the book is wonderful, but the reality is that I don't find it particularly en The sentiment behind this book is great--encouraging us to give to others, social justice, awareness of human need in developing countries, etc. The story itself is just so dull that whenever my son trots over to me with it I heave an internal sigh. It is too wordy in the wrong spots and not wordy enough in others, and the language plods along in an exhausting fashion. The illustrations are engaging, and the *idea* of the book is wonderful, but the reality is that I don't find it particularly enjoyable as a read-aloud. My son does like it and would give it 4 stars, I think! And again--the message is such an important one.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Andrea

    This book was all the rage with elementary teachers when it first came out. In the story, an aid organization donates a goat to a poor African family, which leads to prosperity and a better life for all. It would be wonderful if development were really as simple as a few inexpensive gifts from donors and a willingness on the part of the poor to work hard and be thrifty. But this book oversimplifies people's real problems and suffering to the point of inanity. Beautiful illustrations though. Mayb This book was all the rage with elementary teachers when it first came out. In the story, an aid organization donates a goat to a poor African family, which leads to prosperity and a better life for all. It would be wonderful if development were really as simple as a few inexpensive gifts from donors and a willingness on the part of the poor to work hard and be thrifty. But this book oversimplifies people's real problems and suffering to the point of inanity. Beautiful illustrations though. Maybe cover up the text?

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