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He Must Like You

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Libby's having a rough senior year. Her older brother absconded with his college money and is bartending on a Greek island. Her dad just told her she's got to pay for college herself, and he's evicting her when she graduates so he can Airbnb her room. A drunken hook-up with her coworker Kyle has left her upset and confused. So when Perry Ackerman, serial harasser and the m Libby's having a rough senior year. Her older brother absconded with his college money and is bartending on a Greek island. Her dad just told her she's got to pay for college herself, and he's evicting her when she graduates so he can Airbnb her room. A drunken hook-up with her coworker Kyle has left her upset and confused. So when Perry Ackerman, serial harasser and the most handsy customer at The Goat where she waitresses, pushes her over the edge, she can hardly be blamed for dumping a pitcher of sangria on his head. Unfortunately, Perry is a local industry hero, the restaurant's most important customer, and Libby's mom's boss. Now Libby has to navigate the fallout of her outburst, find an apartment, and deal with her increasing rage at the guys who've screwed up her life--and her increasing crush on the one guy who truly gets her. As timely as it is timeless, He Must Like You is a story about consent, rage, and revenge, and the potential we all have to be better people.


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Libby's having a rough senior year. Her older brother absconded with his college money and is bartending on a Greek island. Her dad just told her she's got to pay for college herself, and he's evicting her when she graduates so he can Airbnb her room. A drunken hook-up with her coworker Kyle has left her upset and confused. So when Perry Ackerman, serial harasser and the m Libby's having a rough senior year. Her older brother absconded with his college money and is bartending on a Greek island. Her dad just told her she's got to pay for college herself, and he's evicting her when she graduates so he can Airbnb her room. A drunken hook-up with her coworker Kyle has left her upset and confused. So when Perry Ackerman, serial harasser and the most handsy customer at The Goat where she waitresses, pushes her over the edge, she can hardly be blamed for dumping a pitcher of sangria on his head. Unfortunately, Perry is a local industry hero, the restaurant's most important customer, and Libby's mom's boss. Now Libby has to navigate the fallout of her outburst, find an apartment, and deal with her increasing rage at the guys who've screwed up her life--and her increasing crush on the one guy who truly gets her. As timely as it is timeless, He Must Like You is a story about consent, rage, and revenge, and the potential we all have to be better people.

30 review for He Must Like You

  1. 4 out of 5

    Chelsea (chelseadolling reads)

    I really, really loved this book. Wow. I went into this expecting to enjoy it, but I truly didn't expect to love it as much as I did and for it to become a new all-time favorite. This book has a mostly lighthearted tone, but it definitely dives deep into how hard it can be to process and work through trauma caused by sexual assault. So, while I do wholeheartedly recommend this book to anyone and everyone that is interested in it, I definitely think you should check out the trigger warnings first I really, really loved this book. Wow. I went into this expecting to enjoy it, but I truly didn't expect to love it as much as I did and for it to become a new all-time favorite. This book has a mostly lighthearted tone, but it definitely dives deep into how hard it can be to process and work through trauma caused by sexual assault. So, while I do wholeheartedly recommend this book to anyone and everyone that is interested in it, I definitely think you should check out the trigger warnings first and make sure that you're in the proper head space before diving it. With all that being said, I adored this book and can confidently say that it'll probably be in my top few books of the year. IT WAS JUST SO DANG GOOD. TW: sexual assault, sexual harassment, coercion, victim shaming/blaming, cyber bullying, ptsd, racism, depression, gaslighting, toxic parent relationships

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jay G

    Want to see more bookish things from me? Check out my Youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCfer... *I recieved an e-arc of this book in exchange for my honest review* Libby is in her senior year of highschool, trying to earn enough money through her waitressing job to make it to college next year. Her father is threatening to kick her out to start his own Air BnB after her brother abandoned the fmaily to bartend in Greece and to make things even more complicated, she hooked up with o Want to see more bookish things from me? Check out my Youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCfer... *I recieved an e-arc of this book in exchange for my honest review* Libby is in her senior year of highschool, trying to earn enough money through her waitressing job to make it to college next year. Her father is threatening to kick her out to start his own Air BnB after her brother abandoned the fmaily to bartend in Greece and to make things even more complicated, she hooked up with one of her coworkers, Kyle. Then when she loses her temper after a particularly handsy customer won't stop badgering her, she has to re-evaluate her plans and hopes of leaving her small town. I liked this a lot more than I originally thought I would! It dives into some pretty serious topics such as mental health, sexual harrassment and assault, consent, victim blaming, and rape culture in a very lighthearted way that isn't too heavy. I loved how the writing didn't come off as preachy in any way, as I often find many books on these topics do. I really liked Libby as a main character and found her to be extremely relatable. I loved her humour and I was definitely cheering her on and wishing the best for her the entire time I was reading her story. I absolutely adored the side characters of Libby's friend group. They were so supportive of her and everything she was going through. I also really enjoyed the side story of her father's declining mental health, but do wish we got to see the outcome of what happened with that. Overall, I really enjoyed this and I'm definitely intrigued to read more of this author's work in the future!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jenny

    4.5 ⭐️ Trigger warnings: sexual harassment, sexual assult/rape, abusive parent/family, misogyny, depression(/bipolar disorder?) Danielle Younge-Ullman tackles a complex subject in a way that entertains you, but also makes you think real hard about some behaviours in a post #metoo society. I have to admit, I found the beginning of this book harder to read than I anticipated. From the very first chapter, Libby is assaulted by a middle-aged man. We are then thrown back 3 months earlier, into a dinner 4.5 ⭐️ Trigger warnings: sexual harassment, sexual assult/rape, abusive parent/family, misogyny, depression(/bipolar disorder?) Danielle Younge-Ullman tackles a complex subject in a way that entertains you, but also makes you think real hard about some behaviours in a post #metoo society. I have to admit, I found the beginning of this book harder to read than I anticipated. From the very first chapter, Libby is assaulted by a middle-aged man. We are then thrown back 3 months earlier, into a dinner with her abusive father and meek mother. It’s an extremely harsh setup. Nevertheless, the author manages to weave in enough humour to alleviate the tension, and it eventually becomes much more bearable to read. I’m one of the lucky ones. The most sexual harrassment I ever was victim of was being whistled at on the street and getting a few lewd looks. But I’ve seen it on the street, at school, in restaurants. And I cannot imagine how hard it can be for waitresses. So I feel like this kind of book is necessary, especially one that shows different types of assault and harassment. I felt like it was too much on Libby, though. She had all this to deal with, plus her family. And the story barely scratched the surface for that last one. Her father was presenting symptoms of much more than depression, and he had some intense anger issues. From having a bipolar family member, his hectic behaviour rang a bell, but I also suspect he was just the general “angry white man who never gets shut down so he keeps yelling every time he’s angry”. Still, it bothers me that that was swept under the rug. Same for Libby’s mom who let her husband roll over her and their children all the time. Libby excused her behaviour from beginning to finish, which I hate because that’s terrible parenting! It’s not perfect, but it hits where it needs to.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Helen

    The bar was extremely high for this book, as far as my expectations, as detailed below. It was a delight to have those expectations met, and surpassed. There is much to love about this book. Our imperfect protagonist Libby sincerely struggles to improve as her world – um – does not. Her best friend supports and shields her (on line and literally with her body), while Libby’s parents – though well-intentioned – are among the most destructive aspects of her life. There is a memorable, unique and ch The bar was extremely high for this book, as far as my expectations, as detailed below. It was a delight to have those expectations met, and surpassed. There is much to love about this book. Our imperfect protagonist Libby sincerely struggles to improve as her world – um – does not. Her best friend supports and shields her (on line and literally with her body), while Libby’s parents – though well-intentioned – are among the most destructive aspects of her life. There is a memorable, unique and charming, romance. There is so much more to this book as well. However, the author’s treatment of sexual harassment, sexual assault and rape are among the most clear and useful that I have ever read – fiction and non-fiction a like. I’ll limit in depth remarks to two exquisite scenes from this book. Libby has experienced encounters with men that are bothering her. She’s disappointed with herself. Then she attends an assembly at her school where a public health nurse defines clearly what consent is and is not. She defines coercion and other aspects of consent until ending with the analogy that if you offer someone tea, and they say they don’t want it, you shouldn’t then make it, pour it, and force them to drink it. In another scene Libby talks to a five-year old – Lottie. A boy bullied Lottie at school. Her parents tell her, “He must like you.” Libby remembers being bullied as a child by the same guy who bullied her last week. She talks to Lottie in a way that’s both age appropriate and respectful to her experience. It honestly brings tears to my eyes remembering that good advice. Read the book to find out what it is. I would have read Danielle Younge-Ullman’s next book no matter what, because I so loved her novel, Everything Beautiful is Not Ruined. Also she’s Canadian. Also her dedication to her daughters is worth the price of admission. That said this novel is extremely engaging and never didactic but points young women both in healthy directions to protect themselves, but also towards ways to seek help if they have been harmed. Bravo! This is a brilliant, Canadian #MeToo title.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Lily

    {4.5} This story is so heartwrenching because to the readers, the hardship and clear sexual assault that Libby goes through is so clear. But yet this book is so real because of the confusion and conflict that she feels about whether or not she is a victim and how to move forward with her life. This book did such an elegant job of detailing so many different perspectives and sides of sexual assault/harassment while also facing various other issues like abuse from her father and confusing relation {4.5} This story is so heartwrenching because to the readers, the hardship and clear sexual assault that Libby goes through is so clear. But yet this book is so real because of the confusion and conflict that she feels about whether or not she is a victim and how to move forward with her life. This book did such an elegant job of detailing so many different perspectives and sides of sexual assault/harassment while also facing various other issues like abuse from her father and confusing relationships with her friends and brother. Libby is such an amazing example of a strong heroin and was so easy to root for throughout the entire story.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Cindy

    And she does it again!! Some authors tackle important issues but aren’t the most engaging of writers, while others are talented writers but just don’t quite hit the mark when it comes to the issues they are trying to deal with. Danielle definitely excels at both - her writing flows so effortlessly that I became totally engrossed in Libby’s story, and she also knows just how to weave the important issues into her writing to make the most impact on the reader. He Must Like You opened my eyes to the And she does it again!! Some authors tackle important issues but aren’t the most engaging of writers, while others are talented writers but just don’t quite hit the mark when it comes to the issues they are trying to deal with. Danielle definitely excels at both - her writing flows so effortlessly that I became totally engrossed in Libby’s story, and she also knows just how to weave the important issues into her writing to make the most impact on the reader. He Must Like You opened my eyes to the many different kinds and levels of sexual harassment and assault, some of which I had never really considered before. I felt Libby’s pain and confusion as she tried to work through what had been happening to her, at the same time living in a toxic family situation with a father obviously struggling with his own psychological problems which have been damaging his wife and children for years. The issues that Libby has to deal with are numerous and so overwhelming that my heart broke for her, but her journey is such an important one that I think everyone should read this book! I highly recommend it!!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Kassie

    This book was infuriating! I have to recognize that the way Daniella Younge-Ullman wrote this story was clearly on purpose. It's meant to piss off the reader from the various situations our main character Libby is thrown into. It was very well done. I also absolutely loved all of the restaurant talk. Being a server is fun and insane and comes with having to learn how to set boundaries with strangers and knowing that you have back up from your coworkers and management if things go downhill. Again This book was infuriating! I have to recognize that the way Daniella Younge-Ullman wrote this story was clearly on purpose. It's meant to piss off the reader from the various situations our main character Libby is thrown into. It was very well done. I also absolutely loved all of the restaurant talk. Being a server is fun and insane and comes with having to learn how to set boundaries with strangers and knowing that you have back up from your coworkers and management if things go downhill. Again, very well done. The one thing I wish we could have had more clarity on is what is going on with the father in the story. I felt like there was not enough closure for the family in regards to the situation that we read about from the various anger isues to the spoilery situation that I won't go into detail on. Trigger Warnings: sexual assault sexual harrassment emotional abuse undiagnosed mental health issues

  8. 4 out of 5

    thi

    tw: workplace sexual harassment, rape (off page; considered after the fact); victim blaming; mc with PTSD; confrontation with rapist; parental depression I know from the above it sounds really heavy but really it’s about ... medium heavy? A book centred around how sexual harassment is truly and unfortunately so common it’s deemed normal and receives passive aggressive treatment by far too many, but not all!! Libby, our mc is self aware but doesn’t back down!! That said Libby doesn’t come out com tw: workplace sexual harassment, rape (off page; considered after the fact); victim blaming; mc with PTSD; confrontation with rapist; parental depression I know from the above it sounds really heavy but really it’s about ... medium heavy? A book centred around how sexual harassment is truly and unfortunately so common it’s deemed normal and receives passive aggressive treatment by far too many, but not all!! Libby, our mc is self aware but doesn’t back down!! That said Libby doesn’t come out completely unscathed and eventually comes to terms with acknowledge and coping with her PTSD; I personally learned from reading this experience that there is no typical behaviour for PSTD and it can take different forms for different people, truly enlightening for myself While not overly graphic, the topics discussed may be triggering so I would proceed with caution, but I do think these discussions are essential

  9. 4 out of 5

    Alanna King

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Caution spoilers ahead! I realize that last year's Danielle Younge-Ullman book Everything Beautiful Is Not Ruined was stellar....like I gave it 10 out of 10 and it was in my top 3 of the year. So I had high hopes for He Must Like You....but this isn't nearly as nuanced and insightful and intimate. It tries to be - searching for the parallels between how girls and boys are socialized, and the bravely tackling different levels of consent, but....it felt formulaic (girl wants boy), contrived (the a Caution spoilers ahead! I realize that last year's Danielle Younge-Ullman book Everything Beautiful Is Not Ruined was stellar....like I gave it 10 out of 10 and it was in my top 3 of the year. So I had high hopes for He Must Like You....but this isn't nearly as nuanced and insightful and intimate. It tries to be - searching for the parallels between how girls and boys are socialized, and the bravely tackling different levels of consent, but....it felt formulaic (girl wants boy), contrived (the assembly? blech) and way too happy of an ending....talking through things to your rapists, Dad's bipolar under control with only the promise of a medical regime, Perry being shamed by the town, and a promising class action suit. The author just tried to pack in too many characters and too many subplots.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Shelby

    *Thanks to the publisher for providing me with an ARC via Netgalley 3.5 stars HE MUST LIKE YOU is a very important, relevant book telling the story of Libby, who has been sexually assaulted and is working her way to justice and healing. While this is an extremely heavy topic and very relevant today, the author handled it with care and was able to also throw in supportive friends and coworkers who helped Libby through her journey, as well as provided humor and lighthearted times throughout the book *Thanks to the publisher for providing me with an ARC via Netgalley 3.5 stars HE MUST LIKE YOU is a very important, relevant book telling the story of Libby, who has been sexually assaulted and is working her way to justice and healing. While this is an extremely heavy topic and very relevant today, the author handled it with care and was able to also throw in supportive friends and coworkers who helped Libby through her journey, as well as provided humor and lighthearted times throughout the book. Libby was a strong, realistic main character, and I really liked her narration style, but I didn’t feel too attached to her as a main character, though her story was one I really appreciated. I haven’t been in a similar position and therefore cannot discuss the accuracy of events in the book or information given, but from an outsider’s perspective it seemed to be handled realistically and with care. I did think the author had a lot of things going on in Libby’s life, regarding family drama, the assault case, and a romance, and some of it took a backseat to the point where I almost thought some of the lesser elements could have been left out since they weren’t developed as well. For example, I would have liked to have seen more time spent with a racial event that happened toward the end of the book, because it was there and gone almost immediately. The ending was also a little more abrupt than I would have liked, but overall this was an enjoyable and important book.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Ashley Lynne

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Wow! I knew this was going to cover the topic of sexual assault, but I was pleasantly surprised by how deeply this book touched on other issues! And the reason I’m putting the spoiler curtain on this review....here are a few topics I thought were dealt with really well (no technical spoilers, but a lot of giving details): -not knowing what you want to do after high school -being afraid of the expectations others have put on you -a situation where a person didn’t even REALIZE they assaulted another Wow! I knew this was going to cover the topic of sexual assault, but I was pleasantly surprised by how deeply this book touched on other issues! And the reason I’m putting the spoiler curtain on this review....here are a few topics I thought were dealt with really well (no technical spoilers, but a lot of giving details): -not knowing what you want to do after high school -being afraid of the expectations others have put on you -a situation where a person didn’t even REALIZE they assaulted another person, and how that was dealt with -forgiving someone who has sexually assaulted you because of the circumstances -parent struggles. We all have them. -parents being sick and weak and struggling and needing help. It’s so hard to see and makes your world feel so unsafe and unstable because the people who make your world feel safe and stable are proving they aren’t capable of that, whether it be temporary or permanent. It’s terrifying and hit very close to home when I read about it in this book This author has written other books I’m interested in and I hope I see adult books from her in the future!

  12. 5 out of 5

    ✰ Alexandra ✰

    TW: Sexual Assault, Rape I was really excited to read this one when I heard it was tackling the important discussion of consent and while I do think that Younge-Ullman creates a space for these lessons to be learned, I had a hard time connecting to the writing and the overall plot. Libby, a high school senior is struggling with making ends meet for her college fund and longs to escape her town, especially from multiple male acquaintances she is consistently surrounded by. Because of these issues, TW: Sexual Assault, Rape I was really excited to read this one when I heard it was tackling the important discussion of consent and while I do think that Younge-Ullman creates a space for these lessons to be learned, I had a hard time connecting to the writing and the overall plot. Libby, a high school senior is struggling with making ends meet for her college fund and longs to escape her town, especially from multiple male acquaintances she is consistently surrounded by. Because of these issues, Libby finds herself lost and conflicted on the right actions to take against these men and for herself as a young woman. I really appreciated the discussion of consent and the importance of “no meaning no” and that (view spoiler)[Libby finally has the ability to come to terms with her past traumas (i.e. recognizing and verbalizing that fact that she was raped), (hide spoiler)] yet I found there to be too many subplots to follow for this novel to be as impactful as it seems to want to be. The romanced seemed to be a bit lackluster and could have been fleshed out more or utilized in a stronger way to progress the messages of the story. In addition, Libby’s issues and relationship with her father could have made up an entirely different novel in itself and thus, felt a bit underdeveloped. Overall though, I think there needs to be a bigger space in books, especially those geared towards young adult readers on the conversation of consent and I appreciate Younge-Ullman’s decision to do so. *ARC received by the publisher in exchange for an honest review*

  13. 5 out of 5

    Cathi - LovesBooksMore

    Wow. As a mom of two teen daughters this was difficult yet powerful to read. Libby has had some rough changes in her life recently being forced to grow up quickly. To top it off, she has been sexually assaulted. She struggles with trying to decide if that is really what happened and how she deals with the overwhelming feelings she now has and how to deal with them. You can’t help to root for Libby in this book and support her to the end.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Tracey

    This YA novel explains consent jn an excellent, relatable way for high school and older, and for both young women and men. It also speaks about friendship, dysfunctional families, and sexual harassment. The story is told in the voice of a confused and angry high school senior girl who learns how to assert herself.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Lauren Hannough-Bergmans

    Alongside “Moxie” and “Female of the Species”, this is going on my top teen reads for budding feminists list. This book features such an important conversation about consent, and how it isn’t always clear, and the dangers of putting yourself and others past where their lines are drawn. Libby is such a great character who is at once unsure of herself and filled with such power.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Emily (emilykatereads)

    "My mom said the same thing to me in first grade when I told her Rod Catena and his friends—wretched cretins even back then—were spending recess throwing balls of ice at Emma and me. 'He must like you,' she said, as she gently attended to the goose egg on the side of my head. 'He probably has a crush on you.'" Rage, frustration, empathy, understanding. That's what this book brought out in me. So many of us can relate to aspects of Libby's story, and that's what made this book heart-wrenching. We "My mom said the same thing to me in first grade when I told her Rod Catena and his friends—wretched cretins even back then—were spending recess throwing balls of ice at Emma and me. 'He must like you,' she said, as she gently attended to the goose egg on the side of my head. 'He probably has a crush on you.'" Rage, frustration, empathy, understanding. That's what this book brought out in me. So many of us can relate to aspects of Libby's story, and that's what made this book heart-wrenching. We follow Libby, who's dealing with a disaster of a family situation while navigating the sexual assault and harassment she's also suffered in the past. She navigates what consent looks like and the ways in which men take advantage of women. It was a nuanced story in the ways she faced her trauma. It was also encouraged in this book that people seek help when they need it. The ways Libby deals with her trauma may not work for everyone, and its her choice in how she navigates it, and the fact that it's always 100% her choice is a perpetuating theme. The one thing her situation really highlighted though is that it is not always black and white. I loved Libby as a character. She truly develops and grows as the story progresses and she had me rooting for her the whole time. It also helps that so many aspects of her life are relatable, and it was really easy to get emotional invested in her story. All it took was the first chapter to get me so angry and empathetic for her; anyone who's worked in food service, or anywhere really, has dealt with men like she encounters. This book had me crying not in sadness but anger. Also because aspects of this hit so close to home. There was a lot that went on with her family that was truly another nightmare on top of her already existing problems, and while the situation isn't totally what I've experiences, elements of it really had me feeling for Libby because I've felt so much of that too. Speaking out and standing up for yourself to family is huge, and if you've dealt with difficult and dramatic family situations, it's probably relatable to you in ways as well. Overall, I'm very happy to have discovered this Canadian author and happy to have had the pleasure of meeting her at Penguin's OLA event. I'll be watching to see what else she writes. *Arc received from publisher for honest review*

  17. 4 out of 5

    Taryn

    HE MUST LIKE YOU is an excellent YA contemporary exploring consent, rage, familial relationships and so much more. Infuriating in its relatability, Younge-Ullman’s depictions of the life of a teenage girl are so realistic. The discussions surrounding rape culture & consent were very nuanced and well done, exploring the many different perspectives and ways in which sexual harassment & assault occurs. Libby’s confusion as she was working through her own experiences is hard to read at times but SO HE MUST LIKE YOU is an excellent YA contemporary exploring consent, rage, familial relationships and so much more. Infuriating in its relatability, Younge-Ullman’s depictions of the life of a teenage girl are so realistic. The discussions surrounding rape culture & consent were very nuanced and well done, exploring the many different perspectives and ways in which sexual harassment & assault occurs. Libby’s confusion as she was working through her own experiences is hard to read at times but SO realistic. Though it deals with a lot of heavy, hard-hitting topics, this is overall pretty light-hearted in tone. This is an excellent starting point for teens to read about consent and rage, and I’ll definitely be recommending this for years to come.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    Loved it! Danielle Younge-Ullman has an incredible ability to tell a story without trying to play on your emotions. I encourage every young woman to read it!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Ria Reads Books

    One of the best books I’ve read this year.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Susan Marshall

    A heart-wrenchingly real and engrossing novel about the difficult issues around consent that should be a must-read for every teen.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jaye Berry

    I did not vibe with this at all and it isn't even worth the time to finish, bye.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Isabel

    i did not vibe with this.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Zemira (Kylo Ren fangirl) Warner

    Another win from Danielle Younge-Ullman. He Must Like You deals with consent and rape so if those are your triggers, stay away.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Deep_Abyss

    3.5 stars I wrote a whole review why I didn’t like this story as much as I thought I would, and then I realized it sounded rude and vague. So now, it’s going to be short and simple. This story didn’t work for me. The whole plot felt fast and short, and too much was happening. The main character sounded sharp and strong at first, but as the story grew on, I felt like I lost the character I knew. That’s it. No shame. I don’t hate this book. It’s good. That’s it.

  25. 4 out of 5

    JoAnne Richards

    I had seen this title come up frequently. Kept thinking to myself, I must find this book. Found it and just finished reading it and wow! And, I just finished reading Joanne (Levy's) review.....and yes, everything Joanne says is perfect....ditto. And yes, this book has been written or categorized as a YA. I would like to encourage all adults of all ages to read it. Both female and male. Adults in my age group will recognize this inappropriate behaviour and yes, for years it has been excused, allo I had seen this title come up frequently. Kept thinking to myself, I must find this book. Found it and just finished reading it and wow! And, I just finished reading Joanne (Levy's) review.....and yes, everything Joanne says is perfect....ditto. And yes, this book has been written or categorized as a YA. I would like to encourage all adults of all ages to read it. Both female and male. Adults in my age group will recognize this inappropriate behaviour and yes, for years it has been excused, allowed because "he's just joking around, or he's a great guy". The storyline proves how wrong this behaviour really is. Danielle has expertly pointed out the wrongs. Brought in some resources and good advice and written it smoothly with a touch of humour so that poor Libby doesn't lose her mind, as well as a wonderful strong group of friends. Loved it. Highly recommend it to all.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Lorena

    "And every day I'm working on the new me-the calm but relentless me; the me who stands up for herself without going off the deep end, and who knows how to think and say." I loved He must like you. It had a light tone and was super easy and fast to read while also dealing with serious topics (focusing on misogyny but talking about other problems too). I loved Libby and her journey. I loved how real everything in her life and all the other characters felt. But what I probably loved the most was "And every day I'm working on the new me-the calm but relentless me; the me who stands up for herself without going off the deep end, and who knows how to think and say." I loved He must like you. It had a light tone and was super easy and fast to read while also dealing with serious topics (focusing on misogyny but talking about other problems too). I loved Libby and her journey. I loved how real everything in her life and all the other characters felt. But what I probably loved the most was how in the end it leaves you with this sense of calmness and the feeling that it'll all be okay and how you can grow and learn and stand up for yourself. Yep, I really liked this book.

  27. 4 out of 5

    ♛ cameron ♛

    I’m so used to YA novels dancing around or just flat out ignoring the importance of consent, so this book just really ended up being special for tackling it head on. Not just talking about “no means no,” but also coercion, consenting to some sexual activities, but no others, and how silence is not consent. I’ve read another book from this author before, Everything Beautiful Is Not Ruined, so I was expecting the book to handle rough topics with a mix of comedy, but I didn’t expect for this book I’m so used to YA novels dancing around or just flat out ignoring the importance of consent, so this book just really ended up being special for tackling it head on. Not just talking about “no means no,” but also coercion, consenting to some sexual activities, but no others, and how silence is not consent. I’ve read another book from this author before, Everything Beautiful Is Not Ruined, so I was expecting the book to handle rough topics with a mix of comedy, but I didn’t expect for this book to be so hard to read. I especially didn’t expect to feel as angry reading it as I did. Libby’s having a rough senior year. Her older brother absconded with his college money and is bartending on a Greek island. Her dad just told her she has to pay for college herself, and he’s evicting her when she graduates so he can Airbnb her room. A drunken hookup with her coworker has left her upset and confused. So when Perry Ackerman, serial harasser and the most handsy customer of The Goat where she waitresses, pushes her over the edge, she can hardly be blamed for dumping a pitcher of sangria on his head. Now Libby must deal with the fallout of her outburst. I loved the main character, Libby, so much. She is put into so many difficult situations where she has to be the grownup amongst grownups, something so many young girls and women will relate to. Although Perry had sickening behavior and would hit on teenaged girls, Libby was expected to deal with it. She had to face hardships from every man in her life to be considered worthy to them. She remained so strong and mature, despite deserving a break. I truly felt for her when bad things came her way. I wish Libby didn’t have to go through all the things that happened to her, because I felt so much realism in her character. I had to read this relating to so many bad things that happened, and knowing that this is the experience of almost every woman. I truly hated the character of Perry. He was the perfect embodiment of creepy old guy who uses his power to let him get away with anything. Honestly he deserves worse than getting sangria dumped on him. I also disliked Libby’s father. I know he was going through things, but his emotional abuse on his family should have had more repercussions. This book was just very powerful. It explored so much more than what I was expecting. I knew that there would be the details of Perry’s sexual harassment to Libby and every other woman in their town, but I didn’t expect to be as truly disturbed as I was. The horrors of everyone being aware of his behavior, and just letting him get away with it was too real. The matters of PTSD from rape was another surprise, but a welcome one. I liked that this book covered all the horrible ways rape effects a person. I think it could be so educational to people. Despite all the heavy topics, this book is not depressing to read, and I’d recommend it to everyone.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Amy (novelteahappyme)

    “He Must Like You” from Canadian author Danielle Younge-Ullman is a standout amongst the YA titles released in 2020. Filled with realistic woes and the often bumpy road navigating relationships in our teen years, at it’s core this book is most potently an authentically angry and surprisingly funny story about family, friendships, mental health, emotional well-being and sexual harassment. Libby’s having a rough senior year. Her older brother absconded with his college money and is bartending on a “He Must Like You” from Canadian author Danielle Younge-Ullman is a standout amongst the YA titles released in 2020. Filled with realistic woes and the often bumpy road navigating relationships in our teen years, at it’s core this book is most potently an authentically angry and surprisingly funny story about family, friendships, mental health, emotional well-being and sexual harassment. Libby’s having a rough senior year. Her older brother absconded with his college money and is bartending on a Greek island. Her dad just told her she’s got to pay for college herself, and he’s evicting her when she graduates so he can Airbnb her room. A drunken hook-up with her coworker Kyle has left her upset and confused. So when Perry Ackerman, serial harasser and the most handsy customer at The Goat where she waitresses, pushes her over the edge, she can hardly be blamed for dupming a pitcher of sangria on his head. Unfortunately, Perry is a local industry hero, the restaurant’s most important customer, and Libby’s mom’s boss. Now Libby has to navigate the fallout of her outburst, find an apartment, and deal with her increasing rage at the guys who’ve screwed up her life - and her increasing crush on the one guy who truly gets her. I appreciate how fluidly the novel begins, introducing readers almost immediately to main character Libby and two important supporting characters Kyle and Perry as the three play an important part in the story’s relevant and timely story about consent, trauma, and the potential we all have to be better people. There are several other side characters, all extremely well-crafted with distinct personalities and important roles to play in Libby’s life. It is through these varied and sometimes complex relationships that readers grow to instinctively care about Libby. Author Younge-Ullman does a superb juxtaposing her protagonists internal thoughts and feelings against what she feels society (and her family) expects her to do and say. The writing here is vibrant, honest, and extremely well-paced. This is a book you will not want to miss and a story that deserves to be spoken about amongst readers, friends, families and students. A great choice for high-school libraries and teen readers. Sincere thanks to Penguin Teen Canada for an advanced review copy.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Beth Rodgers

    'He Must Like You' by Danielle Younge-Ullman is an intensely provocative look at the various ways in which consent, upset, lack of choice, and the fallout of decisions can affect one's life. Libby's interactions with everyone from her parents to her friends to her boss and even her boss' boss are weighing on her life, making it extremely difficult for her to cope with the feelings of aggravation that she is experiencing. Despite all of this, she aims to turn that aggravation into determination t 'He Must Like You' by Danielle Younge-Ullman is an intensely provocative look at the various ways in which consent, upset, lack of choice, and the fallout of decisions can affect one's life. Libby's interactions with everyone from her parents to her friends to her boss and even her boss' boss are weighing on her life, making it extremely difficult for her to cope with the feelings of aggravation that she is experiencing. Despite all of this, she aims to turn that aggravation into determination to do what is right. However, the cost of doing so has her worried about how her life will turn out since what is right isn't so easy. While her father tries to prepare her for leaving the house so he can turn her room into an Airbnb space, she also finds herself having to deal with his tantrums that only get exacerbated by the troubles she's going through. Add to this a night with a co-worker that she isn't sure if she consented to, along with Perry Ackerman, the guy who basically runs the town, hitting on her every chance he gets (to put matters lightly), and Libby finds herself in the depths of despair over what to do. When she takes matters into her own hands, she teeters between regret for what she's done and how it impacts her life and the feeling of awesomeness that accompanies the revenge she has been aiming to achieve for so long. The novel does a fantastic job keeping readers on their toes, thinking about what exactly consent means. It also delves quite adeptly into the thought process of a young girl who wants to be taken seriously but doesn't want to have that happen at the cost of her pride. The way in which she counters Perry's proposals and deals with the despair she finds herself feeling after a number of inopportune encounters is a testament to Danielle Younge-Ullman's writing in this book. The beauty of her words and the way the story is presented as one in which Libby is dealing with her past as a way to make it through her present as a means to her future is engaging, purposeful, and realistic. It captures a variety of emotions, from lust to shame, regret, understanding, love, and more. This novel should definitely be added to any to-read list! Beth Rodgers, Author of 'Welcome to Chanu-Con!,' a Children's Picture Book, and Freshman Fourteen' and 'Sweet Fifteen,' Young Adult Novels *Review originally posted at YABooksCentral.com*

  30. 4 out of 5

    Joanne

    An important book everyone should read. And I really mean EVERYONE. Everyone knows rapists are sweaty, leering men who wear trenchcoats and lurk in the bushes, waiting for vulnerable women to attack, right? These are the men everyone warns us about. These are the men that we're always on the lookout for. Why we travel in groups at night. But what about all those subtle, almost silly, and easily shrugged off things that happen almost every day. The actions we endure that fall into grey areas: unwa An important book everyone should read. And I really mean EVERYONE. Everyone knows rapists are sweaty, leering men who wear trenchcoats and lurk in the bushes, waiting for vulnerable women to attack, right? These are the men everyone warns us about. These are the men that we're always on the lookout for. Why we travel in groups at night. But what about all those subtle, almost silly, and easily shrugged off things that happen almost every day. The actions we endure that fall into grey areas: unwanted touches, skeevy comments, not-so-innocent jokes, unsolicited vulgar pictures? Or what about the guy who seems nice and cool and respectful, but crosses a line? Or drinks too much and presumes a no can turn into a yes? Or who assumes that because a woman gave in that means she was into it and not just bowing to pressure? These are the topics covered so masterfully in He Must Like You. It's a frank, accessible, enlightening, and ultimately empowering discussion about consent, sexuality, harassment, and how we think of and treat women. I think many women will see themselves in these pages and might even look back on past events in a different light, with the #metoo spotlight shining bright on their experiences. But I hope that even more, men do the same. I hope they see how they might have done better themselves or been better allies. This book is a powerful tool that is at the same time as entertaining as it is important. Highly recommended.

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