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In this heartfelt, funny, touching memoir, Tan France, star of Netflix's smash-hit QUEER EYE, tells his origin story for the first time. With his trademark wit, humor, and radical compassion, Tan reveals what it was like to grow up gay in a traditional Muslim family, as one of the few people of color in Doncaster, England. He illuminates his winding journey of coming of ag In this heartfelt, funny, touching memoir, Tan France, star of Netflix's smash-hit QUEER EYE, tells his origin story for the first time. With his trademark wit, humor, and radical compassion, Tan reveals what it was like to grow up gay in a traditional Muslim family, as one of the few people of color in Doncaster, England. He illuminates his winding journey of coming of age, finding his voice (and style!), and how he finally came out to his family at the age of 34, revealing that he was happily married to the love of his life--a Mormon cowboy from Salt Lake City. In Tan's own words, "The book is meant to spread joy, personal acceptance, and most of all understanding. Each of us is living our own private journey, and the more we know about each other, the healthier and happier the world will be."


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In this heartfelt, funny, touching memoir, Tan France, star of Netflix's smash-hit QUEER EYE, tells his origin story for the first time. With his trademark wit, humor, and radical compassion, Tan reveals what it was like to grow up gay in a traditional Muslim family, as one of the few people of color in Doncaster, England. He illuminates his winding journey of coming of ag In this heartfelt, funny, touching memoir, Tan France, star of Netflix's smash-hit QUEER EYE, tells his origin story for the first time. With his trademark wit, humor, and radical compassion, Tan reveals what it was like to grow up gay in a traditional Muslim family, as one of the few people of color in Doncaster, England. He illuminates his winding journey of coming of age, finding his voice (and style!), and how he finally came out to his family at the age of 34, revealing that he was happily married to the love of his life--a Mormon cowboy from Salt Lake City. In Tan's own words, "The book is meant to spread joy, personal acceptance, and most of all understanding. Each of us is living our own private journey, and the more we know about each other, the healthier and happier the world will be."

30 review for Naturally Tan

  1. 5 out of 5

    Deanna

    My reviews can also be seen at: https://deesradreadsandreviews.wordpr... Tanweer Wasim "Tan" France is an English fashion designer. He is one of the Fab 5 from “ Queer Eye ” on Netflix. Tan is the fashion expert on the series. I really didn’t know a lot about Tan before reading his book. I had heard of the Netflix series, “ Queer Eye ” but had never watched it. Tan was raised in a traditional Muslim family in South Yorkshire, England. If you ask him when he first knew he was gay, he’ll tell My reviews can also be seen at: https://deesradreadsandreviews.wordpr... Tanweer Wasim "Tan" France is an English fashion designer. He is one of the Fab 5 from “ Queer Eye ” on Netflix. Tan is the fashion expert on the series. I really didn’t know a lot about Tan before reading his book. I had heard of the Netflix series, “ Queer Eye ” but had never watched it. Tan was raised in a traditional Muslim family in South Yorkshire, England. If you ask him when he first knew he was gay, he’ll tell you he’s always known. He loves women, but he never thought of them as an option for his romantic future. Tan never felt that his feelings were wrong or that he had to put a stop to them, but explains what it was like growing up. Tan always knew he’d marry a man. Of course, he didn’t know it would be a Mormon cowboy from Salt Lake City. Tan didn’t care much for school but still managed to get very good grades. Getting to and from school was dangerous due to the threat of physical violence from the groups who yelled racial slurs at Tan and his siblings on a regular basis. Tan gives us insight into his first relationships as well as his marriage to husband, Rob. His love for Rob really comes across and is lovely to read about. He talks about the casting process for “Queer Eye”, how he became one of the “Fab 5”, and some other bits about the show and his cast mates. I liked the PSA’S (public service announcements) about T-shirts, jeans, and more. There is some relationship advice (First Date Do’s and Don’ts), some advice about employment (Tan had over 30 jobs), some “How to be a Good Boss” advice, and of course some great fashion tips. I know that Tan would probably hate my “well-loved” sweatpants and how often I wear them. Oh and if Tan is ever coming over to your house? HIDE YOUR CROCS! I know they are ugly, and many people hate them (especially Tan) but they are just so damn comfortable. The book took me longer to read as I kept stopping to Google something or watch something on YouTube or Netflix. I stopped so I could watch an episode of “Queer Eye” because I wanted to see Tan in action. I ended up binge-watching the first season. I loved it. When Tan would mention something that happened in an episode I had to go find it. When he talked about their appearance on “Lip Sync Battle”, I had to go watch that too. I really did enjoy learning so much about Tan. His witty writing style was fun to read. "Naturally Tan" was funny and entertaining, but it was also emotional and thought-provoking. Tan comes across as a kind, sincere, and unique person. He doesn't seem to take himself too seriously. He tells us about his own anxiety and insecurities and talks about how it can be strange giving advice to someone on the show when he didn’t always feel so confident himself. I’m really happy that I read this memoir. I’m now a big fan of Tan France and “Queer Eye”. I love Tan’s accent and I think the audiobook will also be great, especially if he is the narrator. I'd like to thank St. Martin’s Press for providing me with an advanced copy of this book. All opinions are my own.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Charlotte

    They say you shouldn’t meet your heroes. You also might want to think twice before reading their memoir. I really wanted to love this - I’m a fan of Queer Eye and the Fab 5 - but it was such a disappointment. There were some fundamental issues I had with the way the book was put together, each chapter seemed to jump from one thing to another and nothing really flowed that well as a result. Tan is not a natural storyteller and it shows. My main issues, however, were how judgemental everything cam They say you shouldn’t meet your heroes. You also might want to think twice before reading their memoir. I really wanted to love this - I’m a fan of Queer Eye and the Fab 5 - but it was such a disappointment. There were some fundamental issues I had with the way the book was put together, each chapter seemed to jump from one thing to another and nothing really flowed that well as a result. Tan is not a natural storyteller and it shows. My main issues, however, were how judgemental everything came across. Tan constantly criticises things in fashion etc that he hates and says should never be worn again. At one point he says he hates it when women have really long hair and it’s a pet peeve of his, sometimes it’s shoes, other times it’s leggings. I get that he is the ‘style guy’ on QE and people look to him for this content but sometimes it felt unnecessarily harsh. Other times it just felt a bit redundant. Coming for Crocs when everyone in the world knows they’re ugly. Even Crocs know that Crocs are ugly. Who cares? Isn’t the whole point of QE to get people to be the best version of themselves? To love themselves, no matter the flaws? This intention isn’t really synonymous with one of its stars penning a book dragging every single thing he hates in fashion because it’s not to his personal taste. I bought his memoir to read about his life and learn more about him because I like him, not to be told my long hair made me look like I’d just escaped from a cult. There are some highlights in the book though, especially the bits about meeting his husband and his experiences growing up in one of the few non-white families in northern England, though these moments seemed to come along sparingly. Tan has had a really interesting life, it’s just a shame so much of this book isn’t about it.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Paromjit

    This is a insightful memoir of the life of Tanweer Wasim, otherwise more commonly known as Tan France, as one of the Fab Five of Queer Eye, a hit show on Netflix. It takes an easy, casual conversational approach that makes this a comfortable immersive reading experience as we learn of Tan's past and how he ended up on the much loved TV show in a non-linear narrative peppered with his fashion tips and advice. What makes this a fascinating read is that he is South Asian, gay and muslim, from a tra This is a insightful memoir of the life of Tanweer Wasim, otherwise more commonly known as Tan France, as one of the Fab Five of Queer Eye, a hit show on Netflix. It takes an easy, casual conversational approach that makes this a comfortable immersive reading experience as we learn of Tan's past and how he ended up on the much loved TV show in a non-linear narrative peppered with his fashion tips and advice. What makes this a fascinating read is that he is South Asian, gay and muslim, from a traditional and conservative family background, with a challenging childhood of growing up in Doncaster, Yorkshire, facing bullying and racism. He comes across as warm and humorous, a real personality, a fashion designer who worked his way through a myriad of jobs prior to his audition for Queer Eye. He relates falling in love with his husband, Rob, from Salt Lake City, a Mormon cowboy, giving us an endearing account of their relationship. There are aspects of his life that Tan chooses to be less than forthcoming about, but that is his right and does not detract from the authenticity of who he is and the life he has lived. This is an entertaining, often humorous and thought provoking memoir in which Tan comes across as so very human, touching on important issues such as the experience of being a muslim gay man in our contemporary world. There was much that I could relate to, and Tan is open about who he is, his anxieties, dishing out life lessons such as the importance of being true to who and what you are, an important tenet of Queer Eye, a show that he gives us behind the scenes information about. Many thanks to Random House Ebury for an ARC.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Heather K (dentist in my spare time)

    *3.5 stars* I'm a fan of Tan France, and I find him to be charming, funny, but a bit aloof. His book feels the same way. Naturally Tan was an easy, enjoyable read that actually felt like Tan wrote it instead of the book being fully reworked by a ghostwriter. It had his voice and cadence, and I loved that about it. Tan's upbringing, love life, and religion aren't new to anyone who watches his show, but we learn a bit more about the details in his book. I liked the anecdotal details about his child *3.5 stars* I'm a fan of Tan France, and I find him to be charming, funny, but a bit aloof. His book feels the same way. Naturally Tan was an easy, enjoyable read that actually felt like Tan wrote it instead of the book being fully reworked by a ghostwriter. It had his voice and cadence, and I loved that about it. Tan's upbringing, love life, and religion aren't new to anyone who watches his show, but we learn a bit more about the details in his book. I liked the anecdotal details about his childhood and family, and I loved his very firm commitment and love for his husband, but if you are expecting a lot of very personal details, you will won't really find them here. Tan stays a bit guarded while telling his story, and any details about his religion, further details about his romance, and many of the juicier tidbits aren't in the book. Though I learned more about Tan than I knew perviously, it didn't quite satisfy me. On the flip side, while I liked that the book felt like Tan wrote it himself, it's also very apparent that Tan isn't a writer. It doesn't have a polished feel, and the books seems a bit choppier and more scattered than I would like. I think if you are a fan of Queer Eye or Tan France, you will enjoy this book. It's a light, easy read, and it made me smile and learn a bit more about fashion, so I'll call it a win. *Copy provided in exchange for an honest review* goodreads|instagram|twitter|blog

  5. 5 out of 5

    Whitney Atkinson

    i enjoyed learning tan’s backstory but his advice chapters are shaky. never wear sweats around your significant other? if you find something you like, always buy more than one? im trying to be gracious that we have lots of cultural differences but it definitely made me go hmmm...... also he makes sweeping statements about fashion like “boot cut jeans look bad. blue hair and long hair are ugly” and i could only think really dude??? i liked tan on the show but the tone of this book edged toward con i enjoyed learning tan’s backstory but his advice chapters are shaky. never wear sweats around your significant other? if you find something you like, always buy more than one? im trying to be gracious that we have lots of cultural differences but it definitely made me go hmmm...... also he makes sweeping statements about fashion like “boot cut jeans look bad. blue hair and long hair are ugly” and i could only think really dude??? i liked tan on the show but the tone of this book edged toward condescending more often than not. i hope it’s a case of bad word choice and editing and that he’s not actually like that.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jasmine from How Useful It Is

    I started reading Naturally Tan on 5/11/2019 and finished it on 5/16/2019. This book is an excellent read. Normally memoirs put me to sleep but this book is actually written in a way that I feel like Tan is talking to me. It’s upbeat and honest and I found myself wanting to get to know him and learn from his experiences. I have never heard of Tan France and the Netflix show Queer Eye until I receive the surprise book mail, advance copy for review. I went on Netflix right after I open my book mai I started reading Naturally Tan on 5/11/2019 and finished it on 5/16/2019. This book is an excellent read. Normally memoirs put me to sleep but this book is actually written in a way that I feel like Tan is talking to me. It’s upbeat and honest and I found myself wanting to get to know him and learn from his experiences. I have never heard of Tan France and the Netflix show Queer Eye until I receive the surprise book mail, advance copy for review. I went on Netflix right after I open my book mail to watch two episodes from season 1. Tan worried about himself not being silly enough on the show compared to the other guys, but I thought their silliness is a bit annoying. I do love the end of the show because the transformation is gorgeous. From this book I learned that racism do exist in England too and not just in USA that I know of. This book is told in the first person point of view following Tan France, a Netflix Queer Eye star specializing in fashion. He was born in England and experienced racism against Pakistanis for being a person of color. He learned fashion from an early age through his grandfather’s denim factory. He worked many different jobs growing up and travel to USA often for fun. While in USA he met Rob, now husband and they started dating. Since he couldn’t get married to a man to stay in USA with Rob, they continue their relationship long distance. Later he started a business in the fashion industry to obtain work permit and eventually US green card. Naturally Tan is very well written and a fast paced read. I enjoyed reading his experiences in starting a business and the stress of keeping it afloat. Definitely interesting to learn about international press tours where Tan and the guys are in a room for up to 12 hours just answering questions from different reporters. Each time they answer a question they have to be excited like it’s their first time answering the question. Sounds intense. I’m also surprised that Pakistanis wanting their skin white just like Asians. I enjoy the different advices spread throughout the book. Definitely a good memoir to read to obtain a glimpse into show biz, fashion, marriage, etc. I highly recommend everyone to read this book! Pro: fast paced, page turner, England, humor, advices, starting a business in fashion, press tours, Netflix auditions Con: none I rate it 5 stars! ***Disclaimer: Many thanks to St. Martin’s Press for the opportunity to read and review. Please be assured that my opinions are honest. xoxo, Jasmine at www.howusefulitis.wordpress.com for more details

  7. 5 out of 5

    Brandice

    Tan France is the style expert on Netflix’s Queer Eye and part of the Fab 5. I am a huge fan of the show and like all 5 of the men, though I knew very little about Tan prior to reading this book. Naturally Tan is part memoir and part advice. The advice is dispensed in a casual, friendly manner and includes numerous style-related tips, as well as a few regarding the management of relationships, and how to not let instant fame and wealth go to your head. Tan is playful, thoughtful, and maintains a Tan France is the style expert on Netflix’s Queer Eye and part of the Fab 5. I am a huge fan of the show and like all 5 of the men, though I knew very little about Tan prior to reading this book. Naturally Tan is part memoir and part advice. The advice is dispensed in a casual, friendly manner and includes numerous style-related tips, as well as a few regarding the management of relationships, and how to not let instant fame and wealth go to your head. Tan is playful, thoughtful, and maintains an upbeat, positive outlook on life. I learned a lot about Tan through reading the book, for example, that he lives in Salt Lake City, he worked at numerous clothing retail operations + had his own fashion lines prior to the show, and, he met his husband while vacationing. His stories, much like the advice included in the book, are told in a friendly tone. There was an element of humor throughout Naturally Tan too. I’m not sure I should admit this, but I fully relate to this statement Tan included: ”I’d love to be a better person but I just like being right.” ;) Thank you to NetGalley and St. Martin’s Press for providing an advanced copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Ronnie

    What a terrible book. This is the only one star rating I’ve ever given. I really liked Tan from Queer eye. I listen to JVN’s podcast, and I love him more the more I hear from him. This was the exact opposite. From this book, Tan seems like a judgmental, pretentious asshole. He lists the insults he’s received that have stuck with him forever and changed his behaviors, and then turns around and says that unnatural hair colors are universally unflattering and people whose hair goes down to their but What a terrible book. This is the only one star rating I’ve ever given. I really liked Tan from Queer eye. I listen to JVN’s podcast, and I love him more the more I hear from him. This was the exact opposite. From this book, Tan seems like a judgmental, pretentious asshole. He lists the insults he’s received that have stuck with him forever and changed his behaviors, and then turns around and says that unnatural hair colors are universally unflattering and people whose hair goes down to their butt look like they’ve escaped from a cult and their friends are terrible for not telling them that. Like, thanks, way to go and do exactly what you said hurt you in your youth. He says towards the end of the book that he tries to put himself in other people’s shoes when he’s criticizing their outfits, and ask himself how he’d feel if he was receiving the criticism. Did he not even read this book?? He literally gives borderline cruel insults to so many different people, and he’s downright flippant about it. Did he think that it doesn’t count because he’s not saying it to anyone’s face? Did he not consider that some of his readers would be people who make some of those fashion “mistakes,” and be hurt while reading how insensitive he is? One of my favorite things about America the past two times I’ve visited is how everyone seems to be having their own moment in fashion, about how it seems like people are much more free to be themselves these days. In his opinion, you can do that.... as long as you’re not doing one of, um, five million things that are not just wrong, they just make you an imbecile for ever even considering them (in the way his opinion comes off). He makes so many allowances for himself, and then doesn’t consider that other people see themselves as marching to the beat of their own drums as much as he does. He gives himself space for gray areas, but sees everyone else’s fashion sense in black and white. He makes a point of how much he dislikes bullies... and then proceeds to sound like a huge bully multiple times in this book. And then blames how many jobs he’s had on being a millennial? That is the negative *stereotype* of a millennial, so... way to reinforce that misguided image. Most millennials aren’t actually flakey assholes, they’re just willing to make hard decisions in order to search for a genuinely fulfilling job. That is not the same as walking away from a job at your lunch break, or hopping over the bar in the middle of your shift. That’s called being rude. And I have no desire to listen to someone who is unapologetically rude. The most important thing I’ve learned in life is that your first impression is almost always wrong. From this book, it seems Tan’s life philosophy is the exact opposite of that. He makes up his mind and refuses to let any other fact or perception change his opinion. That level of stubborn shows a stunning level of immaturity. I can’t imagine being so pretentious as to think I always know best. There are a few exceptions to that, as when he keeps getting to know his blogger friend Rachel and also Antoni, and Tan acts like he’s genuinely the most surprised human that he was wrong about something. (That bloggers are self-indulgent (which is richly ironic coming from him, at this point) and that Antoni was shy and quiet.) I wonder if he’s ever stopped to consider that he could find himself wrong about a lot of things, if he gave them more than five minutes of a chance. He also whines for a significant amount of time about how hard it is to do press for Queer Eye; about how it’s exhausting and he misses his husband and he gets homesick after like two days. And then he tries to make up for how much time he spent whining by ending the chapter with a sentence about how grateful he is? Like, I’m NOT FOOLED. Did he honestly regard a book as his big chance to complain? He could have used his platform for anything. Writing a book is a big deal, especially when you’re so popular. He used it to insult people, make single-minded judgements, and literally say (multiple times!) how much of a jerk he’s been in the past and then fail to realize that he doesn’t sound like he’s done anything to work on those behaviors. His contributions about his experience growing up as an immigrant in Britain were interesting, and in my opinion, were this book’s only redeeming quality. There’s so much negative energy in this book, I hesitated to even keep reading after the first few chapters. I wanted to keep at it though, see if it got better. It didn’t, and I had a sick feeling the whole way through from all the negativity and the fact that this lovely, cheerful, sassy person I’d grown so fond of was actually this bitter human. Maybe that’s naive of me, to think someone would be the same as they are on a reality show, but as I’ve mentioned I’ve sought out JVN’s work and he seems very genuine and consistent. All in all, this book was a huge waste of six hours of my life. It’s a bummer, because I love memoirs, I was in the virtual hold line at the library for weeks, and I had been really excited about it.

  9. 5 out of 5

    da AL

    How I got to reading this book is a mystery to me -- surely I'm not the only book lover for whom one book can sometimes follow another as if by magic. What I'm trying to say is that I loved this even though I've never watched Queer Eye, I enjoyed Tan's sweet, loving, down-to-earth call for people to be their best, to be respectful of each other, to dream, to work hard, and to have fun. I wish Tan & his dear Rob the best! How I got to reading this book is a mystery to me -- surely I'm not the only book lover for whom one book can sometimes follow another as if by magic. What I'm trying to say is that I loved this even though I've never watched Queer Eye, I enjoyed Tan's sweet, loving, down-to-earth call for people to be their best, to be respectful of each other, to dream, to work hard, and to have fun. I wish Tan & his dear Rob the best!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Gabby

    I adore Tan France so much. I was highly anticipating this book, and I received a copy of it from BookSparks, and I couldn’t wait to read it! And I’m so glad I did. I’m a huge fan of Queer Eye and I absolutely adore Tan. I loved getting more insight into his childhood and his marriage and getting casted for Queer Eye and meeting the other guys for the first time. Reading some of those stories from his childhood were heartbreaking, because he dealt with a lot of racism growing up brown in the UK. I adore Tan France so much. I was highly anticipating this book, and I received a copy of it from BookSparks, and I couldn’t wait to read it! And I’m so glad I did. I’m a huge fan of Queer Eye and I absolutely adore Tan. I loved getting more insight into his childhood and his marriage and getting casted for Queer Eye and meeting the other guys for the first time. Reading some of those stories from his childhood were heartbreaking, because he dealt with a lot of racism growing up brown in the UK. I love his passion and love for his husband Rob, I could really feel through his writing how much he loves him. I also loved reading about his first impressions of the rest of the guys on Queer Eye and how wrong he ended up being haha. I appreciate Tan’s honesty about things in this book - like how things made him feel. The only reason I knocked off a star is because this writing doesn’t seem the best (I appreciate the fact that Tan actually wrote this instead of using a ghostwriter - you can obviously tell it was written by him I can hear his voice in this words) but with that being said the writing still isn’t the best, and this book kind of jumps back and forth and all over the place, which I know is the case for a lot of memoirs but I like a little more structure when reading. I also couldn’t care less about fashion so I found myself skimming those sections where he went on and on about fashion, I know that’s a huge part of Tan so I expected it in this book but I was mostly here for him talking about his childhood and his experiences on Queer Eye. Overall this was great. I feel like I spent the last two hours in Tan’s mind and it was a great time. Now I desperately want to re-binge Queer Eye haha. I’m counting down the days till season 4 airs next month!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Steven

    Thanks to Netgalley and St. Martin's Press for providing me with an advanced copy in exchange for an honest review. I loved this book! Non-fiction is rarely my genre of choice, and I don't read a lot of memoirs. I can count on one hand how many non-fiction books I've read in the past five years. But I saw the Fab 5 member Tan France had written something and I just had to read it. As a gay man, this new Queer Eye has been a revelation. I adore them all - the cast members, the "heroes" as they cal Thanks to Netgalley and St. Martin's Press for providing me with an advanced copy in exchange for an honest review. I loved this book! Non-fiction is rarely my genre of choice, and I don't read a lot of memoirs. I can count on one hand how many non-fiction books I've read in the past five years. But I saw the Fab 5 member Tan France had written something and I just had to read it. As a gay man, this new Queer Eye has been a revelation. I adore them all - the cast members, the "heroes" as they call them (meaning the people they're going to help), everything and everybody. It was so interesting to get insight into who Tan is as a person - both before his time on the show, and after. And I love that he's pretty much exactly the same person as before, just more recognizable on the streets. I won't say the writing is perfect. It wasn't. There's a lot of train-of-thought writing and incomplete sentences and sometimes even the paragraph splits don't seem just right... but it didn't matter, because it very honestly felt like I was sitting down and having a conversation with Tan, and just listening to him speak. Highly recommended. --- Lots of train of thought writing, which can be jarring, especially for someone like me who usually avoids non-fiction, but I just love the Fab 5 and it was a pleasure to read about his life. Better review upon release.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Diane

    I had the good fortune to attend an author event with Tan France, and it was an incredibly delightful evening. Tan, who came to fame as the fashion expert on Netflix's show "Queer Eye," was hilarious and charming and it was a joy to hear him tell his stories. With it being clear that I adore Tan France the person, his book is a bit of a meandering mess. I listened to it on audio, which Tan performs himself, and it's a mix of his biography along with his tips on fashion, dating, food, and other li I had the good fortune to attend an author event with Tan France, and it was an incredibly delightful evening. Tan, who came to fame as the fashion expert on Netflix's show "Queer Eye," was hilarious and charming and it was a joy to hear him tell his stories. With it being clear that I adore Tan France the person, his book is a bit of a meandering mess. I listened to it on audio, which Tan performs himself, and it's a mix of his biography along with his tips on fashion, dating, food, and other lifestyle advice. Tan has said he always tries to just be himself on the show, and that effort also came across in these pages. I did appreciate hearing many of his personal stories, such as the racism and prejudice he experienced as a Muslim boy growing up in England, and how he came to be involved in the fashion industry and "Queer Eye." However, there were a lot of public service announcements with Tan delivering his verdict on various fashion and dating choices, which grew tiresome after awhile. But that's OK — I still love Tan and love the show and not everyone can write a great book. He has many other talents. Fun note for "Queer Eye" fans: on the audiobook, Antoni makes a visit to the studio, and it was fun hearing the two of them chat. The behind-the-scenes stories were some of my favorite parts of this book. Opening Passage Straight people love to ask, "When did you know you were gay?" Maybe some people do have an epiphany. I am not that person. For me, when somebody asks me this question, it's the same as someone asking, "When did you know you were a boy?" or "When did you realize you were a human?" Because I breathe. I've always known.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Sahitya

    I didn’t know what the show Queer Eye was about until I saw everyone talking about it on twitter last year and then I decided to binge watch the two seasons ... wow was that an experience. I sobbed in almost every episode and fell in love with the Fab 5 and it’s been wonderful getting to know them better since then. It was also very surprising to see a gay South Asian person on such a mainstream popular show and he quickly became my favorite and I’ve really wanted to know more about Tan. So I wa I didn’t know what the show Queer Eye was about until I saw everyone talking about it on twitter last year and then I decided to binge watch the two seasons ... wow was that an experience. I sobbed in almost every episode and fell in love with the Fab 5 and it’s been wonderful getting to know them better since then. It was also very surprising to see a gay South Asian person on such a mainstream popular show and he quickly became my favorite and I’ve really wanted to know more about Tan. So I was so so excited when I got approved for the advance copy of his memoir and I think it’s awesome that I’m able to review this today, the premier of Season 3. Tan has always come across as the more reserved one among the Fab 5, so I definitely was expecting to get a better read on him through this book and I wasn’t let down. His narrative style is witty, sassy and charming and this is a memoir you won’t mind finishing in a single sitting. He is also quite self deprecating, pointing out his own flaws and owning them while also being very forthright about some of his own opinions. Peppered among the anecdotes from his life are some of his signature fashion tips and I definitely loved them. Some of his advise felt out of place within the context of the chapters (or the book) sometimes, but I think we can’t expect anything different from a designer/stylist. Despite the lighthearted way he tries to convey his story, there are many things he dealt with which are painful and heartbreaking to read about. Especially the racism that he had to encounter for being one of the few people of color in a small town in England, and how the little things like walking back home from school were a lesson in survival were both unpleasant to read, but unsurprising because I think much has not changed since then in some places. His particular mention that brown people can’t run in airports (even when you are late for your flight) just hit me hard because that’s so true and unfair. There are many such observations that he makes about what brown people can or can’t do and it’s painful to realize that we have to keep all this things in mind just to live our lives peacefully. Though I live in the US now, I grew up in India among people who looked like me, so seeing myself represented in media or other aspects of life was never an issue. I realized the importance of it only after moving to a different country, so his issues about representation since childhood felt so much more profound and I think this is such a harsh reality for most of the people of color who live in the west. He is also quite forthcoming about a very painful episode in his life and I commend him for it, because it just goes on to show that just because someone is successful and making money doesn’t mean everything is great with their life. He is also pretty frank about the non glossy side of his celebrity life - the incessant travel, innumerable press junkets, being away from his husband and feeling lonely, the toll it takes to keep up appearances in public - while acknowledging how privileged he is. I was actually surprised by the ease with which he seemed to have handled the fact that he was gay while also being Muslim and South Asian but I think it’s a testament to the strength of his convictions. He is also still very traditional in his mindset and that reflects in the relationship with his husband. It feels like a great love story and they seem to be wonderful supportive partners and I loved reading the parts where he kept gushing about his husband. Their first date and subsequent meetings are especially adorable and it really feels like they were meant to be together. And there are so many things in the book that I found endearing because of the relatability. The conservative nature of the family while growing up, all the nosy family members, the ways we are restricted in terms of dressing up or making friends or going out and how we all learn to lie to do what we want to do - it was so reflective of my own life growing up that I found it very nostalgic. It’s also lovely to see him want to incorporate his culture within his style and I think his mehndi is a wonderful statement in that regard. He is also quite open about the rampant colorism in the South Asian community and our obsession with being fair (essentially white) and associating lighter skin with beauty and his journey about realizing the importance of respecting his own skin color felt so similar to mine. There are many such instances in this book where I thought ... “wow this is exactly what happened to me too” ... and that’s one of the main reasons I really enjoyed this one. If you are a fan of the show Queer Eye, you should definitely check this out because you’ll love it. It definitely goes along with the theme of the show - finding your own path in life, accepting and understanding yourself and spreading joy around you. Tan’s witty writing style makes for a very fun read and you’ll definitely find something in this memoir that you can relate to. However, the blurb does mention about him coming out to his family and revealing the truth about his marriage - it is not included in this advance copy but I hope it’s a part of the final book. This was a lovely book to read and I definitely recommend to everyone. I promise it’ll make you smile.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Heather~ Nature.books.and.coffee

    I listened to "Naturally Tan" on audiobook. I do not watch the show "Queer Eye" and I did not really know who Tan France was but I was seeing this book all over bookstagram so I had to check it out! Well let me just say, I thought this was such a great book! Tan narrated the audiobook himself, which was fantastic because it really felt like he was talking to me. His personality really shone through! I'm not a huge memoir fan but I was impressed with this book. So much truth about how he grew up, I listened to "Naturally Tan" on audiobook. I do not watch the show "Queer Eye" and I did not really know who Tan France was but I was seeing this book all over bookstagram so I had to check it out! Well let me just say, I thought this was such a great book! Tan narrated the audiobook himself, which was fantastic because it really felt like he was talking to me. His personality really shone through! I'm not a huge memoir fan but I was impressed with this book. So much truth about how he grew up, feeling he had to hide who he was. And the racism he has dealt with. Parts that were heartbreaking. And then there was so many parts that really made me laugh! I LOVED the fashion adivice, definitely learned a few tidbits there! Lol. . . I will definitely have to watch "Queer Eye" now for sure! I'd would definitely recommend you read this book!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Malia

    What a delight! I only wish it had been longer:-) If you're a fan of the Fab Five or just want a fun, though thoughtful summer read, give this one a try! Find more reviews and bookish fun at http://www.princessandpen.com What a delight! I only wish it had been longer:-) If you're a fan of the Fab Five or just want a fun, though thoughtful summer read, give this one a try! Find more reviews and bookish fun at http://www.princessandpen.com

  16. 5 out of 5

    Candie

    There wasn't much I particularly disliked about this book, there just wasn't too much I particularly liked either. I was just kind of meh. I listened to this as an audiobook and I do recommend it as Tan narrates it himself, and I feel that his sense of humor and personality are a large part of the book. It was easy to listen to, kind of like watching reality TV, but wasn't really engrossing. I also tried watching the show as I know it is so popular but I just couldn't get into it. :( It was inte There wasn't much I particularly disliked about this book, there just wasn't too much I particularly liked either. I was just kind of meh. I listened to this as an audiobook and I do recommend it as Tan narrates it himself, and I feel that his sense of humor and personality are a large part of the book. It was easy to listen to, kind of like watching reality TV, but wasn't really engrossing. I also tried watching the show as I know it is so popular but I just couldn't get into it. :( It was interesting to hear his experiences of growing up gay and South Asian. It was heartbreaking to hear him share his experiences dealing with racism growing up and still as an adult. No child or person should ever have to go through that. I found his drive to find out what you want and go for it to be very inspiring. He is very real and not afraid to express himself and speak his truth. He seems very genuine. However, I did not really enjoy the rest. It was mostly just about his interests or lifestyle type tips that I didn't find useful such as if you can't find a pair of jeans that fit good, you can just have them altered or that you can't let yourself go you need to continue to make an effort to make yourself desirable for your partner. It was overall pretty judgy. I feel like maybe if you already know who he is and watch the show you may enjoy this book more, but I found I was a little bit uninterested as I couldn't connect with much.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Cynthia

    Naturally Tan is all Tan, naturally. It's about a diverse person sharing their diverse experiences, background, and personality. If anyone wants to get some perspective on such diversity this is a good story to read. Warning though, lots of cursing/swearing/foul/prohibited/adult words; so age appropriate-ness advisable. Naturally Tan is all Tan, naturally. It's about a diverse person sharing their diverse experiences, background, and personality. If anyone wants to get some perspective on such diversity this is a good story to read. Warning though, lots of cursing/swearing/foul/prohibited/adult words; so age appropriate-ness advisable.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie Gillespie

    Thanks so much to NetGalley and St. Martin's Press for an ARC of this book in exchange for my honest opinion. Tan France is one of five TV personalities from the Emmy-award-winning Netflix show Queer Eye. I feel like I should start off by saying that I love Netflix's Queer Eye to pieces, and Tan is always one of my favorite guys on the show. I don’t tend to read very many memoirs, unless there by some of my favorite people. I find it really hard to rate non fiction, as this is about someone's lif Thanks so much to NetGalley and St. Martin's Press for an ARC of this book in exchange for my honest opinion. Tan France is one of five TV personalities from the Emmy-award-winning Netflix show Queer Eye. I feel like I should start off by saying that I love Netflix's Queer Eye to pieces, and Tan is always one of my favorite guys on the show. I don’t tend to read very many memoirs, unless there by some of my favorite people. I find it really hard to rate non fiction, as this is about someone's life, and how can I judge there experiences. So I tend to rate them for enjoyment, and I really liked this book. Tan's voice is exactly how I imagined it would be, he is intelligent ,so sassy and his personality shines throughout the novel. He also doesn’t hold anything back, which I really appreciate. Tan was born in Pakistan and raised in Britain, he is also Muslim. He talks about what it was like going to school and growing up in a mostly white neighborhood. It absolutely broke my heart to hear how desperately Tan wished he were white when he was younger. I'm glad he has come to accept his skin color, as its beautiful! He grew up in a strict Muslim household, so it was so fun reading about his acts of rebellion. I cannot imagine getting on a plan at the age of seventeen and flying to New York, and telling my parents I was sleeping over at a friends. He is a little bit of a bad boy! I really loved his honesty about the show, he was really nervous and that makes me able to connect with him on a deeper level. Most actors brush off being anxious in front of the camera, but Tan relates how he felt uncomfortable. He is touches on his businesses before the show. He has accomplished so much, but his fame isn't without struggles or stress.  I really loved reading the stories about his husband Rob, I never knew much about him until reading this memoir. They were in a long distance relationship for years, while running a business from two different countries. Which both things are incredible, while each are difficult in there own ways, Tan and Rob accomplished them both. There story is so sweet and was a delight to read.  Also I highly recommend the audiobook as its read by Tan. I think if you are a fan of Queer Eye you will adore this book.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Kerri

    I've been wanting to read this book for quite a long time so I was very pleased to get a copy for my birthday recently! I liked it just as much as I had hoped I would. I don't have a favourite from Queer Eye (a show I like a great deal, despite typically avoiding makeover shows whenever possible) but when I watched the trailer for the first season, it was Tan France that pulled me in. I just liked him, and he was the main reason why I decided to give the show a go. I'm glad I did as it's proved I've been wanting to read this book for quite a long time so I was very pleased to get a copy for my birthday recently! I liked it just as much as I had hoped I would. I don't have a favourite from Queer Eye (a show I like a great deal, despite typically avoiding makeover shows whenever possible) but when I watched the trailer for the first season, it was Tan France that pulled me in. I just liked him, and he was the main reason why I decided to give the show a go. I'm glad I did as it's proved a welcome dose of warmth and inspiration since it's release. I think what made me instantly connect with Tan over the others was that he was British. I don't mean that as an insult to American's at all, but the kind of British approach to things feels more natural to me, more in line with the way New Zealand people are. Sometimes America can seem like a lot, and I just don't always get it, if that makes sense. There is a difference in humour that sometimes isn't noticeable but sometimes is. Tan explains this much better than I am somewhere in his book, but annoyingly I haven't marked it! I have a shorter quote that I will include that kind of gets into it, but I'm sure there was a more in-depth one that I just cannot find now. They also told me to Americanise what I was doing, and I got really upset. I was like, "I am a Brit. This is how I do things. I can't be more American." And quite frankly, I had no desire to be. I liked not being over-animated. I think they wanted me to speak loudly, use my body a lot more, and act a little cheesy, but that's definitely not my personality. That kinda thing makes me feel embarrassed for others when I see them doing it. There's no way I could do that myself." I added the bold to highlight the parts that especially made me nod in recognition. Something I often wonder is are all, or most, American people typically this ON, with heightened emotions that seem to be bubbling just under the surface, ready the look direct to camera and emote the hell out of them, or is this more an America entertainers thing? I watch American talk shows on occasion, and it seems to be the default setting, for both host and guest, whereas you see less of it elsewhere. Please note this is not a criticism, just an observation! Note: Tan talks about this more in the chapter Supermarket but it's way too long to include here. It's kind-hearted, enjoyable and makes me want to go to an American supermarket just so I can see the cereal aisle for myself! In this book Tan talks candidly about his issues with depression and feeling suicidal which is obviously a very important thing to discuss. He explains everything very clearly and I think it is always good to have people being open about this kind of thing as I hope it allows others to follow suit. Of equal emotional impact for me was the chapter 9/11. I have seen a long interview with Tan where he talked about this chapter and I am glad that he included it in the book. His experiences as a South Asian man post-9/11 are unfair but unfortunately not surprising. Rob France (Tan's husband) did the illustrations that head up each chapter and I really love them. I already knew I liked his art because I have looked at it quite regularly on his Instagram page! I think they add so much to the book, especially the Naturally Tan one. I found Tan and Rob's relationship very heartwarming, and the parts devoted to that were my favourites of the book.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Libby

    Honestly, I feel like I just read one, huge run-on sentence that Tan France happened to say aloud at one point and someone decided to write it down. I mean, don’t get me wrong, I like Tan France, and I LOVE the new Queer Eye show, but for real, Tan needs to stop subtly (and sometimes not so subtly) fat shaming and slut shaming people. There were quite a few moments I was not picking up what he was putting down. Like how dare he tell his readers to wear one piece swimsuits instead of bikinis becau Honestly, I feel like I just read one, huge run-on sentence that Tan France happened to say aloud at one point and someone decided to write it down. I mean, don’t get me wrong, I like Tan France, and I LOVE the new Queer Eye show, but for real, Tan needs to stop subtly (and sometimes not so subtly) fat shaming and slut shaming people. There were quite a few moments I was not picking up what he was putting down. Like how dare he tell his readers to wear one piece swimsuits instead of bikinis because, “If you’re thirsty for attention, you do you, bish, but if what you want is to feel good about yourself and feel comfortable and supported, wear a one-piece.” That’s a direct quote. How DARE he tell people to wear what HE thinks they’ll be most comfortable in and imply that a one-piece is the only way to respect yourself while wearing swimwear. This book was full of stuff like that. Not to mention that so much of it felt redundant. Like on a smaller sentence level and also just in the grand scheme of the book and its themes. I feel like I read the sentence, “I love an ‘I told you so’ moment” 503025 times while reading this book. All in all: I expected more, but I’m not surprised by what I got.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Bethany

    Actual Rating: 4.5 stars As a fan of Queer Eye I was looking forward to reading Tan's memoir, and it did not disappoint. We get a look at his British childhood, growing up gay and Muslim in a traditional family and the racism he faced as a Pakistani. The we get a brief overview of his teen years and hijinks, the MANY jobs he worked, and his experience starting his own fashion company. (I was unaware of this part of his history, so it was interesting) and then, of course, beginning to work on Quee Actual Rating: 4.5 stars As a fan of Queer Eye I was looking forward to reading Tan's memoir, and it did not disappoint. We get a look at his British childhood, growing up gay and Muslim in a traditional family and the racism he faced as a Pakistani. The we get a brief overview of his teen years and hijinks, the MANY jobs he worked, and his experience starting his own fashion company. (I was unaware of this part of his history, so it was interesting) and then, of course, beginning to work on Queer Eye. Blended in we get fashion tips, advice on long term and long-distance relationships, frank discussions of racist microagressions and racial profiling, and a look at the less-glamorous reality of press tours. I listened to the audiobook of this, and you also get a lovely surprise when Antoni happens in for an off the cuff conversation not found in the book! I enjoyed getting to know more about Tan and love his perspective on the importance of representation in media, especially for kids who often don't see themselves. He's also funny in a very British sort of way. Structurally it's a little all over the place, but I think if you like the show, this is worth a read!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Amy | Foxy Blogs

    I really love Tan on Queer Eye so when I found out he wrote an autobiography it was a no-brainer, for me, on reading it. I really enjoyed listening to Naturally Tan and Tan being the narrator was really enjoyable - I love his accent. Besides sharing about his life he gives advice on everything from fashion to relationships. These little bits of advice are sprinkled throughout the book. It was fun finding out tidbits about Tan and the show like - when Tan was asked to the audition for QE and he t I really love Tan on Queer Eye so when I found out he wrote an autobiography it was a no-brainer, for me, on reading it. I really enjoyed listening to Naturally Tan and Tan being the narrator was really enjoyable - I love his accent. Besides sharing about his life he gives advice on everything from fashion to relationships. These little bits of advice are sprinkled throughout the book. It was fun finding out tidbits about Tan and the show like - when Tan was asked to the audition for QE and he turned it down. Tan does address some bigger topics like gay culture and racism. Midway through the audio Tan's co-star from QE, Antonio shows up and the listeners get to listen to a fun conversation between these two. Then as a bonus at the end of the audio, you get more between Antonio and Tan. Now, I need to go see if the other guys from the show have their own books. Audio book source: Library/Overdrive Narrator: Tan France Length: 7H 3M

  23. 4 out of 5

    Inge

    I absolutely adore Queer Eye. It's my go-to show for when I need a few smiles and I'm so excited for all the books these boys are releasing. So I didn't hesitate to request a review copy for Naturally Tan. I love Tan. He always seems really sweet and down-to-earth, and I love seeing his confidence grow as he spends more time in front of a camera, so we can see more of his naturally snarky self. (One of my favourite quotes from season 3: "Fives? A ten is speaking.") So he shares a few stories for t I absolutely adore Queer Eye. It's my go-to show for when I need a few smiles and I'm so excited for all the books these boys are releasing. So I didn't hesitate to request a review copy for Naturally Tan. I love Tan. He always seems really sweet and down-to-earth, and I love seeing his confidence grow as he spends more time in front of a camera, so we can see more of his naturally snarky self. (One of my favourite quotes from season 3: "Fives? A ten is speaking.") So he shares a few stories for the Queer Eye fans, but I also loved getting to know him as an individual rather than part of the Fab 5. How his life has changed since the show, his infinite love for his husband, life as a POC. It's all there. As the QE stylist, he also gives out some fashion tips, though I felt like these could have been phrased less judgy? He always backtracks by saying "If you like to dress like this, that's fine" but it still bothered me. (Though I will 100% follow him on his mission to ban all Crocs.) The book itself was a really quick and easy read, although a bit haywire at times. Some chapters were just a bunch of random thoughts/stories without any connection. Overall, I thought this was a really lovely read, and I loved getting to know Tan, naturally. Thank you to NetGalley and Penguin Random House UK for providing me with a copy

  24. 4 out of 5

    Sara

    I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. Naturally Tan is the autobiography of Queer Eye’s resident stylist Tan France, and follows his path from South Yorkshire to Salt Lake City, with some great style tips thrown in for good measure. I always like Tan on Queer Eye. He comes across as very genuine, caring and takes his role with great responsibility. In fact, all of the guys do, and that’s why I love the show. So it was nice to read about Tan’s childhood and uncover a li I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. Naturally Tan is the autobiography of Queer Eye’s resident stylist Tan France, and follows his path from South Yorkshire to Salt Lake City, with some great style tips thrown in for good measure. I always like Tan on Queer Eye. He comes across as very genuine, caring and takes his role with great responsibility. In fact, all of the guys do, and that’s why I love the show. So it was nice to read about Tan’s childhood and uncover a little bit about who Tan really is. Early on there’s depictions of some awful racism that capture the fear Tan must have felt everyday just because he wasn’t white. To hear that everything he says becomes the voice of either the gay community, and the South Asian community, must leave a heavy weight of responsibility on his shoulders - but he manages it with pride and passion. It was also great to read how he was cast on the show, and what he actually did for a living before. At some points the text doesn’t really flow all that well. It’s a bit stilted, and the story is a bit all over the place without a proper coherent structure. Having said that, I did like the little injections of styling tips every now and again, I just wish they were more seamlessly integrated into the text. This hasn’t been written by a natural story teller, and it shows, but there is a large amount of heart and fans of Tan and Queer Eye are bond to love this.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jackie

    I won this book in a Goodreads giveaway. It’s a wonderful book and I recommend listening to it when it comes out with an audio version. You can read this as a book, but I felt this is one of those books that should be heard by the authors voice!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Janet

    I received a DIGITAL Advance Reader Copy of this book from #NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. From the publisher, as I do not regurgitate the contents or story of books in reviews, I let them do it. Fashion and compassion make the man. In this heartfelt, funny, touching memoir, Tan France tells his origin story for the first time. With his trademark wit, humour, and radical compassion, Tan reveals what it was like to grow up gay in a traditional South Asian family, as one of the few peop I received a DIGITAL Advance Reader Copy of this book from #NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. From the publisher, as I do not regurgitate the contents or story of books in reviews, I let them do it. Fashion and compassion make the man. In this heartfelt, funny, touching memoir, Tan France tells his origin story for the first time. With his trademark wit, humour, and radical compassion, Tan reveals what it was like to grow up gay in a traditional South Asian family, as one of the few people of colour in South Yorkshire, England. He illuminates his winding path of coming of age, finding his voice (and style!), and marrying the love of his life—a Mormon cowboy from Salt Lake City. From one of the stars of Netflix's runaway hit show Queer Eye, Naturally Tan is so much more than fashion dos and don'ts—though of course Tan can't resist steering everyone away from boot-cut jeans! Full of candid observations about U.S. and U.K. cultural differences, what he sees when you slide into his DMs, celebrity encounters, and the behind-the-scenes realities of "reality TV," Naturally Tan gives us Tan's unique perspective on the happiness to be found in being yourself. In Tan's own words: "The book is meant to spread joy, personal acceptance, and most of all, understanding. Each of us is living our own private journey, and the more we know about one another, the healthier and happier the world will be." I LOVE this show and all the men on it - Tan is my favourite, though --- just imagining what he went through growing up gay, of colour and Muslim (and, well, gorgeous) in South Yorkshire (not the easiest place to be any of the above!!) And that hair ... oh, I love that head of hair! It is utterly readable - just the story of a gay Mormon cowboy from SLC + a South Asian gay Englishman meeting and marrying was worth the price of the book alone! (okay the book was free for me but you can understand what I mean!) Anyone who is questioning or not fitting in for any reason can reap huge rewards from reading this book - it is just freaking awesome!!! (My biography book club will love this pick!) As always, I try to find a reason to not rate with stars as I love emojis (outside of their incessant use by Millenials on Instagram and Twitter) so let's give it.☕☕☕☕☕ (5 cuppas of Yorkshire Gold, the best tea on the planet ... savour it and the book!!) p.s. - Netgalley is not letting me put links to my reviews and their home(s) outside of Goodreads - maybe it is a temporary thing/technical glitch (it also reads that my review is less than 100 words and that I did not rate it with stars...hmmmm) but here are the links in case you want to click on them. https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?s... https://www.facebook.com/janetsbookco...

  27. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    I was pretty obsessed with Queer Eye when the reboot first came out (I don't normally like shows of this kind but something about QE struck a chord with me), and have followed the guys' careers since the show began - specifically listening to Jonathan Van Ness's podcast Getting Curious which is where I became more interested in Tan's story. In one of the podcast episodes Tan recounted to Jonathan some stories of his early years growing up in Doncaster, and it was a really emotional listen. So wh I was pretty obsessed with Queer Eye when the reboot first came out (I don't normally like shows of this kind but something about QE struck a chord with me), and have followed the guys' careers since the show began - specifically listening to Jonathan Van Ness's podcast Getting Curious which is where I became more interested in Tan's story. In one of the podcast episodes Tan recounted to Jonathan some stories of his early years growing up in Doncaster, and it was a really emotional listen. So when I heard Tan was writing a memoir I was excited to get my hands on it to find out more about his life and background. On balance I think that I'm not quite a big enough of a fan to read an entire book on his life, or at least not in the way this memoir was presented. Don't get me wrong, this isn't a bad memoir at all, and I think most fans of the show will find it an enjoyable read - readers get to learn more about how he got cast in the show, some background of how the shooting of the show works and how Tan dealt with the aftermath of the release of the show, all of which made for interesting reading. Tan's voice also comes through well, and I can imagine this being a great audiobook. The parts of the book which didn't work for me were the style tips - I guess these were kind of to be expected given Tan's role in the show but they jarred for me as they felt randomly and almost arbitrarily inserted into the narrative. The book also felt repetitive at times and I'd find myself thinking "I'm sure you mentioned that a few chapters ago...", an issue which the almost formulaic structure of each chapter exacerbated. All in all this was an easy and reasonably engaging read, and had fun insights for fans of the show, it just had a few issues which I found hard to overlook. Thank you Netgalley and Penguin Random House UK / Ebury Publishing for the advance copy, which was provided in exchange for an honest review.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Caidyn (he/him/his)

    DNF at 26% I received an ARC from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. I just... I couldn't. I tried and couldn't get into Tan's voice. I love Tan in the show -- I think he really gives great fashion advice that's very tailored to the hero they're helping that episode -- but I don't like this book. Honestly, simple as that. I just couldn't do it and it was grating on my nerves already. DNF at 26% I received an ARC from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. I just... I couldn't. I tried and couldn't get into Tan's voice. I love Tan in the show -- I think he really gives great fashion advice that's very tailored to the hero they're helping that episode -- but I don't like this book. Honestly, simple as that. I just couldn't do it and it was grating on my nerves already.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    Such an enjoyable lovely read. Tan’s genuine and authentic voice shines through every page. Illustrations were fun and beautifully done. Style advice sprinkled throughout. Can’t say enough wonderful things about this book!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Nuha

    Honestly really made me sad. I know he was trying to be funny and sassy but to be honest, the book just seemed like the judgmental rantings of a jaded business man.

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