counter create hit The Overnight Kidnapper - Download Free eBook
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

The Overnight Kidnapper

Availability: Ready to download

The day gets off to a bad start for Montalbano: while trying to break up a fight on Marinella beach, he hits the wrong man and is stopped by the Carabinieri. When he finally gets to the office, the inspector learns about a strange abduction: a woman was abducted, drugged, and then released unharmed a few hours later. A few days later, the same thing happens again, but this The day gets off to a bad start for Montalbano: while trying to break up a fight on Marinella beach, he hits the wrong man and is stopped by the Carabinieri. When he finally gets to the office, the inspector learns about a strange abduction: a woman was abducted, drugged, and then released unharmed a few hours later. A few days later, the same thing happens again, but this time the woman abducted is the niece of Enzo, the owner of Montalbano’s favorite trattoria. The only link between the two events is that both women are thirty years old and work in a bank. Alongside this investigation, Montalbano has to deal with an arson case. A shop that sells household appliances has burned down, and its owner, Marcello Di Carlo, seems to have vanished into thin air. Has he run off with his lover after a holiday in the Canary Islands? Is he fleeing from his creditors, or was he murdered by the mafia for not paying their protection money? At first this seems like a trivial case, but a third abduction—yet again of a girl who works in a bank—and the discovery of a body bring up new questions. Whose body is it? And where has Di Carlo’s secret lover gone?


Compare
Ads Banner

The day gets off to a bad start for Montalbano: while trying to break up a fight on Marinella beach, he hits the wrong man and is stopped by the Carabinieri. When he finally gets to the office, the inspector learns about a strange abduction: a woman was abducted, drugged, and then released unharmed a few hours later. A few days later, the same thing happens again, but this The day gets off to a bad start for Montalbano: while trying to break up a fight on Marinella beach, he hits the wrong man and is stopped by the Carabinieri. When he finally gets to the office, the inspector learns about a strange abduction: a woman was abducted, drugged, and then released unharmed a few hours later. A few days later, the same thing happens again, but this time the woman abducted is the niece of Enzo, the owner of Montalbano’s favorite trattoria. The only link between the two events is that both women are thirty years old and work in a bank. Alongside this investigation, Montalbano has to deal with an arson case. A shop that sells household appliances has burned down, and its owner, Marcello Di Carlo, seems to have vanished into thin air. Has he run off with his lover after a holiday in the Canary Islands? Is he fleeing from his creditors, or was he murdered by the mafia for not paying their protection money? At first this seems like a trivial case, but a third abduction—yet again of a girl who works in a bank—and the discovery of a body bring up new questions. Whose body is it? And where has Di Carlo’s secret lover gone?

30 review for The Overnight Kidnapper

  1. 5 out of 5

    Roman Clodia

    Amazingly, this series is still going strong at #23 in the series - steeped in Sicilian atmosphere, moody Montalbano continues to charm and amuse, with his usual able sidekicks. Catarella has less of a role than in some books, but does manage to successfully mangle every name given to him - and Adelina deals with a burglar without taking her eyes off the pasta! Classiest of switch-off reading.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Skip

    Three female bank employees are flagged down to help a man working on his car; two are chloroformed, but otherwise unharmed, but the third is superficially slashed. Are they related? Is this a vendetta against banks? Montalbano and his team start asking questions as they always do, and Catarella butchers everyone's names. Mix in a nasty case of arson and the shop owner's disappearance after refusing to pay the Mafia's increased protection money. Then for some spice, add in a jilted lover and you Three female bank employees are flagged down to help a man working on his car; two are chloroformed, but otherwise unharmed, but the third is superficially slashed. Are they related? Is this a vendetta against banks? Montalbano and his team start asking questions as they always do, and Catarella butchers everyone's names. Mix in a nasty case of arson and the shop owner's disappearance after refusing to pay the Mafia's increased protection money. Then for some spice, add in a jilted lover and you have all ingredients for a classic Sicilian mystery by the master, Andrea Camilleri.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Ivonne Rovira

    The Overnight Kidnapper, the 23rd novel in the series featuring Chief Inspector Salvo Montalbano, isn’t up to author Andrea Camillieri’s usual standards, but that still leaves room for it to be pretty good. Two 30-something employees from banks are doused with chloroform before being released unharmed, confusing police. But Salvo eventually links these odd kidnappings with the disappearance of a storeowner whose shop is subjected to arson. Camillieri packs some twists and turns, but it’s not as The Overnight Kidnapper, the 23rd novel in the series featuring Chief Inspector Salvo Montalbano, isn’t up to author Andrea Camillieri’s usual standards, but that still leaves room for it to be pretty good. Two 30-something employees from banks are doused with chloroform before being released unharmed, confusing police. But Salvo eventually links these odd kidnappings with the disappearance of a storeowner whose shop is subjected to arson. Camillieri packs some twists and turns, but it’s not as clever or as humorous as Camillieri’s usual fare; still I’m glad I read it, and I look forward to the next one.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Nancy Oakes

    somewhere between a 3 and a 3.5 -- this isn't Camilleri's best entry in this series, nor is it his worst, but it's somewhere in the middle. I'll post more about this book soon; for now let me just say that he's done better. The thing is though that I will keep reading (and buying) these novels until the last one is translated and published because I am a huge fan. more shortly.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Kathy

    As always, I enjoyed a few belly laughs appreciating the comical exchanges between Montalbano and his staff as well as the frequent reckless driving sequences getting to crime scenes. Typically of late these books have started with dreams hinting at the theme to come, but in this case it's a case of a guilty fly vs innocent fly disturbing his sleep. There are some confusing abductions of women on their way home from work at banks, missing people, concerned friends and family, suspicion of Mafia, As always, I enjoyed a few belly laughs appreciating the comical exchanges between Montalbano and his staff as well as the frequent reckless driving sequences getting to crime scenes. Typically of late these books have started with dreams hinting at the theme to come, but in this case it's a case of a guilty fly vs innocent fly disturbing his sleep. There are some confusing abductions of women on their way home from work at banks, missing people, concerned friends and family, suspicion of Mafia, murders and more...all for Montalbano to resolve. Livia was only offstage via short phone calls. Her presence usually adds warmth, so I missed that. Even so, this author is a favorite and he always makes me laugh.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Richard

    There are aspects here that are frustrating to the avid reader of the Inspector Montalbano series. At times it appears that the brilliant Camilleri is toying with his reader and playing on the success of the popular TV series these books have spawned. Is it an homage to the great detective to explore lighter moments or is it closer to parody and on the cusp of farce? Now reader, I believe all these things are forgivable. For me the author is a genius and based on his success can play with his char There are aspects here that are frustrating to the avid reader of the Inspector Montalbano series. At times it appears that the brilliant Camilleri is toying with his reader and playing on the success of the popular TV series these books have spawned. Is it an homage to the great detective to explore lighter moments or is it closer to parody and on the cusp of farce? Now reader, I believe all these things are forgivable. For me the author is a genius and based on his success can play with his characters in this way. However, this is not an apology in my review of a substandard story as I believe there are aspects here that celebrate the success and I am so pleased to be part of that process. This is a police procedural with Montalbano aided and abetted by Fazio, Augello and Catarella. Here we find the team struggling with a mysterious kidnapper who seems to be escalating in his violence with each abduction. Meanwhile life in the police station is further disrupted by a fire at an electronics store and the disappearance of its owner which has potential Mafia links. The two separate crimes are investigated and progress is slow but methodical. To cut through the routine the author has breathed life into his characters who have become larger than life due to the TV series and Camilleri acknowledges that by his love and care of these individuals here. So we understand the role of the TV news media based on Salvo’s friend at the station. Smile at his tetchy and caustic interactions with Dr Pasquano born out of their mutual respect. When you add the humour, the location and the heart of the fiction, crimes of passion, you have the flavour of these books. When exposed to wonderful food and the Sicilian magic in relationship and character you appreciate why it is a formula that works and produces more success. In this case, all these elements are spun and woven into a complex investigation that although seems familiar, is fresh and compelling. Unlike many of the stories that evolve in books in his series - this one does not recall an actual crime turned into fiction. This is from the mind of the Maestro himself, an original idea, so is precious in itself for this insight into his imagination. A crime mystery that demands engagement by the reader. A book that rewards with entertainment, transportation to another place. Escapism to a point, but countered by sharing lessons from life. I love the digs at getting older and the irksome idiosyncrasies of others that annoy, frustrate but can also be affirming. Andrea Camilleri respects his art too much to just bring out another book, each one I view as a gift and it is a great pleasure to read another one and recommend it to others.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Leslie

    This entry in the Montalbano series lacks the social commentary that many of the previous books featured but the mystery was solid. Translated by Stephen Sartarelli

  8. 5 out of 5

    Ivor Armistead

    Not one of Camilleri’s best efforts.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Steve

    Historically, I have given just about every Montalbano book a four star review. That was generally due to the good mystery, the humor, the surprises, and the character development. This one, The Overnight Kidnapper, lacked all four of those qualities. We have the womanizing Augello, the foul mouthed Pasquano, the inept Catarella, Montalbano's dreams and his preoccupation with getting older, the foodies Adelina and Enzo. But in this book, these are all retreads with little touch of humor, depth o Historically, I have given just about every Montalbano book a four star review. That was generally due to the good mystery, the humor, the surprises, and the character development. This one, The Overnight Kidnapper, lacked all four of those qualities. We have the womanizing Augello, the foul mouthed Pasquano, the inept Catarella, Montalbano's dreams and his preoccupation with getting older, the foodies Adelina and Enzo. But in this book, these are all retreads with little touch of humor, depth or curiosity. The mystery at the heart of the story is also a letdown. I would agree with other reviewers who have said that Camilleri just phoned this one in. Easily the worst and most lifeless of the Montalbano books. If you are reading all of the Montalbano books, you could readily skip this one and invest your precious time elsewhere. If you choose to read it, at least it is a quick read. Definitely not recommended.

  10. 4 out of 5

    James

    The literary equivalent of a Cassata. “A layer of sponge dipped in liqueur is topped with fresh ricotta sometimes mixed with chocolate chips. The cake and ricotta are then covered by a marzipan shell, followed by green icing. Usually, the cake is topped with glace fruit such as cherries. You can find the cake in small or large sizes throughout Sicily but it is said to originate in Palermo.”* It’s delicious, comforting, best enjoyed at leisure and has little to nothing to do with crime but who care The literary equivalent of a Cassata. “A layer of sponge dipped in liqueur is topped with fresh ricotta sometimes mixed with chocolate chips. The cake and ricotta are then covered by a marzipan shell, followed by green icing. Usually, the cake is topped with glace fruit such as cherries. You can find the cake in small or large sizes throughout Sicily but it is said to originate in Palermo.”* It’s delicious, comforting, best enjoyed at leisure and has little to nothing to do with crime but who cares. * copied from a website called something along the lines of Sicilian desserts so good they make you want to cry

  11. 4 out of 5

    Lesa

    Whether it's the actual writing or the translation by Stephen Sartarelli, the twenty-third book in the Inspector Montalbano mystery series, The Overnight Kidnapper, has enough humor involving the office staff at the police department to make it a Sicilian cousin of Bill Crider's Sheriff Dan Rhodes' mysteries. Armchair travelers may want to venture to Sicily for the latest book. You don't need to have read earlier books to enjoy the humor in this one. The opening scenes are already funny. One invo Whether it's the actual writing or the translation by Stephen Sartarelli, the twenty-third book in the Inspector Montalbano mystery series, The Overnight Kidnapper, has enough humor involving the office staff at the police department to make it a Sicilian cousin of Bill Crider's Sheriff Dan Rhodes' mysteries. Armchair travelers may want to venture to Sicily for the latest book. You don't need to have read earlier books to enjoy the humor in this one. The opening scenes are already funny. One involves a fly waking Inspector Salvo Montalbano. The other scene causes him to be late for work. He attempts to break up a fight, and all three men, including Montalbano, are arrested by the Carabinieri. Once he's at work, he learns of the strange kidnapping of a woman. She was abducted, drugged, and released unharmed the next morning. When that happens a second time, with another woman, it doesn't take much for Montalbano to catch the similarities. Both kidnap victims are in their thirties and work at banks. When a third kidnapping turns violent, bankers start to worry. Police don't work in a vacuum, with just one case at a time. Montalbano and his team are also investigating a case of arson. The owner of the burnt out shop, Marcello Di Carlo, has disappeared. Montalbano is shrewd enough to find a connection between Di Carlo's disappearance and the unusual kidnappings. The Overnight Kidnapper is an atmospheric mystery. It's filled with descriptions of Sicilian politics, customs, and food. Readers will appreciate Inspector Montalbano's team and his sly ability to maneuver his superiors. If you're looking for a humorous police procedural series, check out Andrea Camilleri's books

  12. 5 out of 5

    Paul

    The Overnight Kidnapper – Another Montalbano Classic The Overnight Kidnapper is now the twenty fourth book in the Montalbano Mystery series, and once again another classic. All the Andrea Camilleri tricks are in the story, the food, the comedy and the crimes. While at the same time this is one of the few stories not to have originated from a news story. Two women have been kidnaped on their way home from work when they stop to help someone. But the kidnapper makes no ransom demands but releases t The Overnight Kidnapper – Another Montalbano Classic The Overnight Kidnapper is now the twenty fourth book in the Montalbano Mystery series, and once again another classic. All the Andrea Camilleri tricks are in the story, the food, the comedy and the crimes. While at the same time this is one of the few stories not to have originated from a news story. Two women have been kidnaped on their way home from work when they stop to help someone. But the kidnapper makes no ransom demands but releases them later that night or the following day. The victims all say the same thing, they did not see his face, but he had an acrid smell from his sweat. Montalbano and his team are called out to a shop that has been set on fire, a victim of arson, but they are unable to find the owner. His assistant tells the team the owner has been away in Lanzarote for a month and while he was out there fell in love with an Italian female, who happened to be local. When they discover that he has been murdered, in a mafia style murder, and they cannot find his girlfriend, they have many suspects but very little to go on. Montalbano delves in to both mysteries with gusto, once he has eaten his daily lunch fix at Enzo’s trattoria with all the usual suspects. With his colleagues and chance encounters, everything is described with wit and gusto, I just wish they would publish a book on how to make some of the dishes that get mentioned. A proper Montalbano classic.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Carolyn

    This most recent novel in the Inspector Montalbano series continues to impress the reader with the talent and the prodigious body of work of Andrea Camilleri. The clever storyline keeps the reader on the edge of their seat right until the end, when, of course, the inspector comes through and solves the case. But this does not happen until the reader is treated to the hilarious give and take between Salvo, 'poissonally in poison' (read the book) and his co-workers, his superiors, the Mafia, his r This most recent novel in the Inspector Montalbano series continues to impress the reader with the talent and the prodigious body of work of Andrea Camilleri. The clever storyline keeps the reader on the edge of their seat right until the end, when, of course, the inspector comes through and solves the case. But this does not happen until the reader is treated to the hilarious give and take between Salvo, 'poissonally in poison' (read the book) and his co-workers, his superiors, the Mafia, his romantic interest, and of course, his favorite places and foods to eat. Camilleri's wry sense of humor prevails throughout. I have enjoyed reading every book in the series and have recommended it to others who have become hooked on everything Vigata (his fictitious town in Italy where an awful lot of murders seem to take place). The translations are excellent, as are the notes included for the reader. One can only hope that the inspector will have a long and happy career so that we can continue to enjoy his activities and the workings of his process of reasoning out the identity of the culprits. Camilleri gets substantial information across with an economy of words. If you have not read any of the series my advice is to get started right now. Read the series from the beginning, as Camilleri develops his characters incrementally, throughout the series.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    Although crime fiction is often not realistic, one thing that many real and fictional detectives have in common is the need to find a way of surviving encounters with evil. Inspector Montalbano eats delicious Italian dishes, walks on the jetty, swims in the sea a lot, and keeps his distance in personal relationships. And he works, rarely taking a vacation or even getting away for any length of time. When faced with the overnight kidnappings of two women, even though they are found unharmed he as Although crime fiction is often not realistic, one thing that many real and fictional detectives have in common is the need to find a way of surviving encounters with evil. Inspector Montalbano eats delicious Italian dishes, walks on the jetty, swims in the sea a lot, and keeps his distance in personal relationships. And he works, rarely taking a vacation or even getting away for any length of time. When faced with the overnight kidnappings of two women, even though they are found unharmed he assumes that the incidents will escalate. Skillfully written and superbly translated.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jan

    Weirdly good! Camilleri's books are always interesting and populated with characters who truly are, and this is no exception. It's fun to watch Montalbano manipulate both the bureaucracy and the media as well as leaping to unsupported conclusions and getting into ridiculous predicaments. The publisher's blurb is somewhat informative but doesn't know about Catarella! Blackstone Audio really picked the best man for the job when they chose Grover Gardner for narrator. Stephen Sartarelli continues Weirdly good! Camilleri's books are always interesting and populated with characters who truly are, and this is no exception. It's fun to watch Montalbano manipulate both the bureaucracy and the media as well as leaping to unsupported conclusions and getting into ridiculous predicaments. The publisher's blurb is somewhat informative but doesn't know about Catarella! Blackstone Audio really picked the best man for the job when they chose Grover Gardner for narrator. Stephen Sartarelli continues to amaze with his ability to translate idioms into relatable English.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Liisa

    Thoroughly enjoyable--both the mystery and the humor.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Pam Tickner

    I enjoy this series. An easy, between heavy books, read.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Sienna

    When I got the latest book, I realized I'd missed this one. I will admit that one every six months or so is the best dosage, just to keep the silliness fresh & fun. When I got the latest book, I realized I'd missed this one. I will admit that one every six months or so is the best dosage, just to keep the silliness fresh & fun.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Darius Ostrowski

    This one seemed a little bit too much by-the-numbers, as both Montalbano and Mr. Camilleri were both just going through the motions

  20. 4 out of 5

    Elaine

    Completely run of the mill Montalbano. Mostly plot and very little character. The Maestro is phoning it in. But I'll keep reading as long as he keeps writing.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Alison C

    On two separate occasions, two young women are mysteriously kidnapped, rendered unconscious by chloroform and then left, unmolested and unrobbed, to be found some hours later, conscious but unable to identify their assailant. Inspector Montalbano is of course concerned about this strange crime, but he is also in the process of looking into a fire at an electronics store, the owner of which seems to have disappeared. Then a third woman is also kidnapped, but then is found with injuries, and *then On two separate occasions, two young women are mysteriously kidnapped, rendered unconscious by chloroform and then left, unmolested and unrobbed, to be found some hours later, conscious but unable to identify their assailant. Inspector Montalbano is of course concerned about this strange crime, but he is also in the process of looking into a fire at an electronics store, the owner of which seems to have disappeared. Then a third woman is also kidnapped, but then is found with injuries, and *then* a corpse is discovered wrapped in cellophane….I’ve lost count of how many Montalbano books there are now, but this latest one is just a good as all the rest of them. Better, actually, to my mind because for once there are no beautiful young women who fall madly in love with the much older Montalbano, a factor is some of the earlier books that has always annoyed me. The strange kidnappings turn out to be even weirder than they seem, and the larger mystery is handled very well by the author. But as ever, the best thing about a Camilleri novel is the relationships between the main characters; in addition to Montalbano’s usual team of officers, this story introduces a new Prosecutor, Dr. Platania (filling in for Montalbano’s usual nemesis, Dr. Tommaseo) with whom, unusually, Montalbano gets along - a nice touch, that! As always, recommended, but read the series in order (and if you’ve never read any of the Montalbano series, you have many, many hours of enjoyment ahead of you)!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Alan

    Rating between 3 & 4 The actual story is probably closer to a rating of 3. It was less involved than previous novels in the series and had a very small cast. Even livia wa only mentioned a couple of times almost in passing. The 4 star rating is really for the novel itself, the last few montalbano I have read have followed the Colin dexter morse novels and moved from crime mystery fiction into more general literary fiction I think. The translation at least for me flows nicely and doesn’t interfere w Rating between 3 & 4 The actual story is probably closer to a rating of 3. It was less involved than previous novels in the series and had a very small cast. Even livia wa only mentioned a couple of times almost in passing. The 4 star rating is really for the novel itself, the last few montalbano I have read have followed the Colin dexter morse novels and moved from crime mystery fiction into more general literary fiction I think. The translation at least for me flows nicely and doesn’t interfere with the flow of the story. As a comparison a couple of the recent Maigret translations felt as if they had taken a more relaxed approach which for me felt clunky and not in keeping with the story or its locale. I had a vague remembrance of the story from watching the excellent TV movie adaptation of a few years ago but couldn’t remember the details. The only real issue I had with the novel is the sudden end which came almost out of nowhere and just stopped. Not that the killer was a new character who had only just been mentioned but the reasons, motives and personality of the killer were not given the usual Montalbano treatment which detracted from the ending. It felt like there should have been a couple of things extra chapters before the denouement. So with that caveat about the ending another Montalbano novel I would highly recommend. I’m running out of these now, I think a couple left so will have to move into his other novels towards the end of the year.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Carol Evans

    The Montalbano series is not one I read/listen to in order. When I’m between books and one is available at the library I pick it up, which is how I ended up listening to The Overnight Kidnapper. It’s pretty typical for the series. We have some random, brief kidnappings that Montalbano is looking into, along with an arson, but, in true mystery book style, it’s all connected and much more serious than it seems at first, when it turns into a murder investigation. Montalbano is his usual self, amusing The Montalbano series is not one I read/listen to in order. When I’m between books and one is available at the library I pick it up, which is how I ended up listening to The Overnight Kidnapper. It’s pretty typical for the series. We have some random, brief kidnappings that Montalbano is looking into, along with an arson, but, in true mystery book style, it’s all connected and much more serious than it seems at first, when it turns into a murder investigation. Montalbano is his usual self, amusing and charming in his own way. I think the narrator does a good job with him. We’ve got the usual sidekicks and I love the way his housekeeper/cook, Adelina, deals with a break-in without losing track of her pasta. I guess I just like the feel of these books, the characters, the setting, the food. The actual mystery in this one was fine, if a little odd. Who kidnaps a woman for just an hour and then leaves her somewhere to be found? Turns out someone who’s covering up another crime. As always, Montalbano does a thorough job at the investigation, even pulls in his friend at the tv station to set up a bit of a trap. The Overnight Kidnapper is not outstanding, but I enjoyed it. Would I recommend it to someone who hasn’t read any in the series? Probably not, it’s not one of the best, but if you already know Montalbano and his friends and co-workers, it’s always good to tag along on one of his investigations.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Edith

    3 and 1/2 A good deal of the joie de vivre of Camilleri's early books has evaporated before this, the 23rd episode of Inspector Montalbano's investigations. It's not a terrible book, but it's not wonderful either. The old tropes are getting pretty tired--can Catarella please take a nice early retirement? The only thing that usually happens in a Camilleri novel which didn't happen this time is that Salvo and Livia didn't have one of their usual quarrels. Mimì is still chasing girls, Salvo is stil 3 and 1/2 A good deal of the joie de vivre of Camilleri's early books has evaporated before this, the 23rd episode of Inspector Montalbano's investigations. It's not a terrible book, but it's not wonderful either. The old tropes are getting pretty tired--can Catarella please take a nice early retirement? The only thing that usually happens in a Camilleri novel which didn't happen this time is that Salvo and Livia didn't have one of their usual quarrels. Mimì is still chasing girls, Salvo is still eating at Enzo's and taking the usual walk along the breakwater, Pasquano is still obnoxious, etc. Number 23 concerns the peculiar kidnappings of young women who are chloroformed but are soon released unharmed; soon it develops an even more serious aspect. The culprit is pretty easily identified, so what fun there is comes from observing the inspector at work. You might well ask why I am still reading these novels if I find them disappointing. I think the reason is that I keep hoping Camilleri will somehow have returned to form. And there is something, even now, that is very ingratiating about Inspector Montalbano, even though he does less that surprises us. If you have not read this series, don't start with this entry; start with The Shape of Water (#1) or The Snack Thief (#3), novels which are well above average and transcend the police procedural genre.

  25. 4 out of 5

    James Lewis

    Andrea Camilleri's most recently translated novel featuring Inspector Salvo Montalbano is the first that is pure invention. Like Carl Hiaasen, Camilleri usually finds enough criminal insanity in his local newspaper on which to base a story. This tale begins when Montalbano tries to break up a fight on the beach below his home, gets involved in the altercation, and is arrested by the carabinieri—a typically madcap opening to a Camilleri mystery. On arrival at the office, he learns that a local wo Andrea Camilleri's most recently translated novel featuring Inspector Salvo Montalbano is the first that is pure invention. Like Carl Hiaasen, Camilleri usually finds enough criminal insanity in his local newspaper on which to base a story. This tale begins when Montalbano tries to break up a fight on the beach below his home, gets involved in the altercation, and is arrested by the carabinieri—a typically madcap opening to a Camilleri mystery. On arrival at the office, he learns that a local woman has been kidnapped but released unharmed shortly thereafter. When the same thing happens soon thereafter, the story is off and running. The story contains all the quirkiness one expects from Camilleri, including Montalbano's efforts to deceive his superiors about how he's going about the investigation. To that extent, it's vintage stuff. This book suffers from two flaws, however. One is that when the resolution is reached, a major subplot doesn't add up. Why did the perpetrator feel the need to do X? It doesn't make much sense. The second is an obvious example of "Chekhov's gun." I won't say more about it for fear of spoiling the experience for the reader, but by the time Montalbano has figured out what happened, the reader already knows. This is not the strongest outing for Camilleri—perhaps, like Montalbano, age is creeping up on him--but it's still a Sicilian lark.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Alarie

    My husband and I recently watched a Netflix DVD of two Inspector Montalbano mysteries (Italian with English subtitles). We enjoyed them, so my husband brought this volume, translated by Stephen Sartarelli, home from the library. From casting to script, the videos and book are well matched. The Inspector works in a fictional town in Sicily. The plots are multi-layered and usually quirkier than typical Who Done Its. Montalbano himself is an interesting mixture of suave gentleman and hot-headed ren My husband and I recently watched a Netflix DVD of two Inspector Montalbano mysteries (Italian with English subtitles). We enjoyed them, so my husband brought this volume, translated by Stephen Sartarelli, home from the library. From casting to script, the videos and book are well matched. The Inspector works in a fictional town in Sicily. The plots are multi-layered and usually quirkier than typical Who Done Its. Montalbano himself is an interesting mixture of suave gentleman and hot-headed renegade. He’s brilliant at his job, but worries he’s losing his edge in middle age. This particular case starts off with a quirky series of kidnappings and turns to gory murder, but is it one case, two, three, four, or five? The more they uncover, the less they know. I dislike detective super heroes who go in with guns drawn and overcome 20 or 30 other guys shooting at them. The setting and police officers in this series feel like real people, except maybe for the comical desk sergeant who speaks the Sicilian equivalent of hillbilly. He mangles every caller’s name when he passes the message onto Montalbano. You’d think he’d won the lottery when he stays at work until 3:00 a.m. and gets to eat a salami panini with the boss.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Judith

    I've waited until I finished reading all of the English translations of the Montalbano stories I could find--and there is at least one novella (The Fourth Secret), and probably some short stories I've missed--to write a review. As with every series, some of the installments are better than others. My favorite aspects of the books are the sense of place Camilleri evokes (and Sartarelli beautifully conveys in his translations and endnotes) in his descriptions of Sicilian customs, language, and foo I've waited until I finished reading all of the English translations of the Montalbano stories I could find--and there is at least one novella (The Fourth Secret), and probably some short stories I've missed--to write a review. As with every series, some of the installments are better than others. My favorite aspects of the books are the sense of place Camilleri evokes (and Sartarelli beautifully conveys in his translations and endnotes) in his descriptions of Sicilian customs, language, and food; and the character he's built in the imperfect and personally dysfunctional--but sometimes insightful--Inspector Salvo Montalbano. I've enjoyed--to greater and lesser degrees--reading about his cases and his life in Vigata. On more than a few occasions, I have cringed at the consistent misogyny displayed in Camilleri's description of most of his female characters, and his tendency to farce doesn't delight me, but most of the novels are solid for the genre, and I recommend the series if you like crime fiction. I'm glad I read them, and I'll seek out future books, and keep on the lookout for anything I've missed.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Tony Fitzpatrick

    Latest translated novel featuring Salvo and crew, this time on the trail of a mysterious person who kidnaps young female bank staff, drugs them with chloroform, and leaves them, having neither demanded a ransom or assaulted them. The plot thickens with a possible mafia crime, and then a double murder. Hugely formulaic but none the worse in entertainment value for that. Lots of the usual humour, repartee and cast of characters. In the end the crime was hard to solve by the reader given that the p Latest translated novel featuring Salvo and crew, this time on the trail of a mysterious person who kidnaps young female bank staff, drugs them with chloroform, and leaves them, having neither demanded a ransom or assaulted them. The plot thickens with a possible mafia crime, and then a double murder. Hugely formulaic but none the worse in entertainment value for that. Lots of the usual humour, repartee and cast of characters. In the end the crime was hard to solve by the reader given that the perpetrator and his relationship with the murder victims doesn’t get introduced until very late in the book. We are somewhat encouraged to assume the identity of the culprit (as indeed does Montalbano, who kicks himself for making errors, putting it down to age). Montalbano’s appetite remains enormous, and he has at least eight portions of pasta n’casciatta in this book - a lovely dish I have also managed to cook for myself. First published in Italian as La giostra delgi scampi in 2015. English translation published February 2019. Read on Kindle.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Nancy

    I have enjoyed the Inspector Montalbano mysteries. This one took me longer to get in to. Several women, all employees in local banks, are kidnapped, drugged, and held for a short time (but not raped or assaulted otherwise). Each is confused about why she was kidnapped and so are the police. Finally a fourth is kidnapped, but this time the woman's naked body is found, covered with bruises and dead. A man that she knows (a client of the bank where she worked, is found stripped and stabbed. Montalb I have enjoyed the Inspector Montalbano mysteries. This one took me longer to get in to. Several women, all employees in local banks, are kidnapped, drugged, and held for a short time (but not raped or assaulted otherwise). Each is confused about why she was kidnapped and so are the police. Finally a fourth is kidnapped, but this time the woman's naked body is found, covered with bruises and dead. A man that she knows (a client of the bank where she worked, is found stripped and stabbed. Montalbano has to figure out who is committing this attacks and why the last one seems to have veered away fro m the pattern. A little slower than the others I've read, and with only one description of the lovely Sicilian meals his housekeeper prepares, rather than descriptions of several meals. (Maybe that's why I wasn't as engaged - the previous books made me want o drip everything and fly to Sicily for the food.)

  30. 4 out of 5

    Kimberly Ann

    First, I am missing the subtle humor that once was a part of Montalbano's character. I'm not so happy about the escalating graphic violence portrayed, hence - 1/2 ★ From the back cover: ".....When he finally gets to the office, he (Montalbano) learns about a strange abduction-a woman was kidnapped, drugged, and then released unharmed only hours later. Within a few days, the same thing happens again. Both women are thirty years old and work in a bank. Montalbano also must deal with an arson case. A First, I am missing the subtle humor that once was a part of Montalbano's character. I'm not so happy about the escalating graphic violence portrayed, hence - 1/2 ★ From the back cover: ".....When he finally gets to the office, he (Montalbano) learns about a strange abduction-a woman was kidnapped, drugged, and then released unharmed only hours later. Within a few days, the same thing happens again. Both women are thirty years old and work in a bank. Montalbano also must deal with an arson case. A shop has burned down, and its owner, Marcelo Di Carlo, has vanished into thin air. This seems like a trivial incident, but a third abduction-yet again a girl who works in a bank-and the discovery of a body bring up new questions." I do like the characters of the policemen. I'm happy Livia was absent. I ♥ Montalbano's penchant for great food (I should be able to dine w/ him). I liked the Red Herring that is only revealed towards the end.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.