counter create hit Astounding Science Fiction, March 1942 - Download Free eBook
Hot Best Seller

Astounding Science Fiction, March 1942

Availability: Ready to download

Table of Contents: The Editor. Science-Fiction and War A. E. Van Vogt. Recruiting Station Lester del Rey. The Wings of Night Roby Wentz. Day After Tomorrow Martin Pearson. The Embassy In Times to Come The Analytical Laboratory Anson MacDonald. Goldfish Bowl Suppressed Violence Isaac Asimov. Runaround Malcolm Jameson. Dispersion Brass Tacks Eric Frank Russell. Describe a Circle


Compare

Table of Contents: The Editor. Science-Fiction and War A. E. Van Vogt. Recruiting Station Lester del Rey. The Wings of Night Roby Wentz. Day After Tomorrow Martin Pearson. The Embassy In Times to Come The Analytical Laboratory Anson MacDonald. Goldfish Bowl Suppressed Violence Isaac Asimov. Runaround Malcolm Jameson. Dispersion Brass Tacks Eric Frank Russell. Describe a Circle

30 review for Astounding Science Fiction, March 1942

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jamie

    Short, smart, funny, foreboding.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Roger

    This issue of Astounding Science Fiction, the best pulp magazine ever, includes "Goldfish Bowl" by Robert A. Heinlein (as Anson MacDonald), Recruiting Station by A. E. van Vogt, Runaround by Isaac Asimov, and other stories. "Goldfish Bowl" is one of Heinlein's least excellent stories, in my opinion, but still one of the best stories in this issue. Likewise "Recruiting Station" is not among van Vogt's better works, though it may be the origin of the sci-fi idea of time-traveling recruiters. "Runa This issue of Astounding Science Fiction, the best pulp magazine ever, includes "Goldfish Bowl" by Robert A. Heinlein (as Anson MacDonald), Recruiting Station by A. E. van Vogt, Runaround by Isaac Asimov, and other stories. "Goldfish Bowl" is one of Heinlein's least excellent stories, in my opinion, but still one of the best stories in this issue. Likewise "Recruiting Station" is not among van Vogt's better works, though it may be the origin of the sci-fi idea of time-traveling recruiters. "Runaround" is one of Asimov's robot stories, perhaps a little less polished than his later works, playing with the notion that his 3 laws of robotics are relative and not rigid. It takes place on Mercury, which is more interesting than the robot aspects. "The Wings of Night" by Lester Del Rey puts the lie to the currently fashionable accusation that the editor, John W. Campbell, Jr., was a "racist" -- if that were true, this gem wouldn't have gotten into his magazine. "Describe A Circle" by Eric Frank Russell follows a typical space pirate/mutiny theme, written better than the typical pulp versions, though it does get bogged down in a lengthy action sequence. I found "The Day After Tomorrow" by Roby Wentz interesting because it's American underground forces fighting back against invaders reminded me of Heinlein's "Sixth Column," which very coincidentally was published in paperback under the title "The Day After Tomorrow." In this case America has lost World War Two (though that's not specified, it's implied who the invaders are). This issue is also interesting because it's apparently the first issue to go to press after Pearl Harbor; there are several references to things like Heinlein (MacDonald) not being available to write more for the duration, which Campbell predicts will take at least two and a half more years. Also the letter column, "Brass Tacks" is interesting because both Heinlein and MacDonald are praised by readers who don't know they're the same man. I'd give the issue 5 stars for it's historical interest, only 4 stars for it's literary quality.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Maggie Gordon

    I love the Donovan and Powell shorts! Asimov uses these two to explore how robot behaviour can go wrong, but without devolving into the tired, robots are evil stereotypes. As Runabout shows, robot behaviour is all controlled by programming, so if a robot is acting strangely, a human can usually use logic to figure out why. In this case, the two men send an advanced robot out to gather energy materials for the Mercurian base that they are on, but the robot gets stuck too far out for the humans to I love the Donovan and Powell shorts! Asimov uses these two to explore how robot behaviour can go wrong, but without devolving into the tired, robots are evil stereotypes. As Runabout shows, robot behaviour is all controlled by programming, so if a robot is acting strangely, a human can usually use logic to figure out why. In this case, the two men send an advanced robot out to gather energy materials for the Mercurian base that they are on, but the robot gets stuck too far out for the humans to get to. He seems drunk, but really his trapped between logic shifts caused by geological activity. The three laws are interacting in a manner that forces him to shift constantly between two, leaving him unable to complete or abandon his task. Donovan and Powell must figure out how to pull Speedy out of his logical loop before they run out of power at their base! It's a fun, golden age story heavily relying on science, but with a good dose of fun characters and excitement!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Husam Starxin

    Runaround is the first book in Asimov's I,Robot series which introduces the entire set of three laws of robotics, which is very important for a reader that's trying to understand the reasoning behind these robot's behavior. This story brings about a very intersting dilemma, which is what would happen if one of the robotic laws conflicted with another one. Naturally one would think that the easiest way to go is to evaluate these laws by priority and importance, and make the robots follow them acco Runaround is the first book in Asimov's I,Robot series which introduces the entire set of three laws of robotics, which is very important for a reader that's trying to understand the reasoning behind these robot's behavior. This story brings about a very intersting dilemma, which is what would happen if one of the robotic laws conflicted with another one. Naturally one would think that the easiest way to go is to evaluate these laws by priority and importance, and make the robots follow them accordingly. And it is infact the case in Asimov's laws, however this story tackles these laws in a very interesting way that would never have occurred to a casual reader with basic understanding of robotic reasoning. The issue that I found with the plot though is that the entire issue could've been resolved with a better natural language parser, which you would think such a robot would absolutely have, given how expensive and state of the art it is.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jesse

    I've begun reading Asimov's Robot stories to Raven. We began with Runaround because I thought he'd like Powell and Donovan, I remember them as good grounding characters. Also this story is the first to define the 3 Laws of Robotics, which Raven had actually heard of from a video. Anyway, this story is a little overly long for what happens, but is good. The characters are entertaining and the story is puzzling and engaging. Raven seemed to like the old-school style as I read it aloud. A good begin I've begun reading Asimov's Robot stories to Raven. We began with Runaround because I thought he'd like Powell and Donovan, I remember them as good grounding characters. Also this story is the first to define the 3 Laws of Robotics, which Raven had actually heard of from a video. Anyway, this story is a little overly long for what happens, but is good. The characters are entertaining and the story is puzzling and engaging. Raven seemed to like the old-school style as I read it aloud. A good beginning.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Norman Cook

    This is minor Heinlein, at best. Perhaps when it was published in 1942 it broke new ground, but today it's a trifle that's been done many times. The idea of an unknown (and probably unknowable) alien culture taking human specimens for observation has become trite. And to top it off, one of the protagonists (a typical Heinlein super-genius) comes up with a cockamamie explanation of who their captors are, with absolutely no data to substantiate the hypothesis. There's really no character developme This is minor Heinlein, at best. Perhaps when it was published in 1942 it broke new ground, but today it's a trifle that's been done many times. The idea of an unknown (and probably unknowable) alien culture taking human specimens for observation has become trite. And to top it off, one of the protagonists (a typical Heinlein super-genius) comes up with a cockamamie explanation of who their captors are, with absolutely no data to substantiate the hypothesis. There's really no character development, and the attempt at irony at the end just falls flat.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Doctor Science

    Pretty slight Heinlein. I'm RAH, I know about the Navy! Merged review: A very "primitive" story in many ways. Notable that the problem is solved via programming, basically. Also notable for showing tech change: the robots from the expedition 50 years before are in fact primitive compared to Speedy. The description of the spacesuits etc. is *hilariously* precise and antique. Build a rocket ship in your back yard! Pretty slight Heinlein. I'm RAH, I know about the Navy! Merged review: A very "primitive" story in many ways. Notable that the problem is solved via programming, basically. Also notable for showing tech change: the robots from the expedition 50 years before are in fact primitive compared to Speedy. The description of the spacesuits etc. is *hilariously* precise and antique. Build a rocket ship in your back yard!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Alysha DeShaé

    I'm not sure if the language of the time (first published in 1942) included the use of the phrase "infinite loop" as we understand it in regards to programming today, but I love how easily and obviously the concept was described without the phrase. I also love the introduction of the three laws of robotics. I've known the laws for most of my life, I suppose, but I've never read their original introduction into our world until I read this story. :-D I'm not sure if the language of the time (first published in 1942) included the use of the phrase "infinite loop" as we understand it in regards to programming today, but I love how easily and obviously the concept was described without the phrase. I also love the introduction of the three laws of robotics. I've known the laws for most of my life, I suppose, but I've never read their original introduction into our world until I read this story. :-D

  9. 4 out of 5

    Marie

    3.5-stars The second short story in Asimov's classic I, Robot, "Runaround" is the story of a group of scientists and robots on Mercury who encounter a problem during their mission, but recall that there is some outdated equipment elsewhere on the planet from a mission that occurred approximately 10 years prior. Points to Andy Weir's sci-fi geekness for paying homage to classic sci-fi in The Martian. 3.5-stars The second short story in Asimov's classic I, Robot, "Runaround" is the story of a group of scientists and robots on Mercury who encounter a problem during their mission, but recall that there is some outdated equipment elsewhere on the planet from a mission that occurred approximately 10 years prior. Points to Andy Weir's sci-fi geekness for paying homage to classic sci-fi in The Martian.

  10. 4 out of 5

    David Meditationseed

    Its more interesting as reflection than history: what would be the moral and ethical judgment of robots in decision-making involving humans, even if there are laws and rules for them; how would robots interpret them?

  11. 5 out of 5

    A Critical Reader

    Short story by Heinlein about mysterious events. It's one of those stories I wish the author had expanded upon - but realize that the story is almost certainly only as compelling as it is because of the unsolved mystery. Short story by Heinlein about mysterious events. It's one of those stories I wish the author had expanded upon - but realize that the story is almost certainly only as compelling as it is because of the unsolved mystery.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Patricia Ferreira

    Really good. I liked it a lot, very funny.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jana

    Přečteno pro zajímavost. Kupodivu to není zase tak špatné :)

  14. 4 out of 5

    Austin Wright

    Written in March 1942. More Heinlein Tragedy!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Old Man Aries

    First published in Astounding SF, March 1942 as by Anson MacDonald. First collected in The Menace From Earth, 1959.

  16. 5 out of 5

    o20n3

    A great breakdown of the three rules during a life or death situation.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jeff Yoak

    This story seemed a little cute to me originally, but it has grown on me in the re-reading.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Peter

    The story where the three laws of robotics were first put forward. Good short story too.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jhseltzer

  21. 5 out of 5

    Les Abernathy

  22. 5 out of 5

    Rodrigo Bercini Martins

  23. 4 out of 5

    Zachary

  24. 4 out of 5

    Arturs

  25. 5 out of 5

    Connor

  26. 4 out of 5

    Paul Loggins

  27. 5 out of 5

    Lena

  28. 5 out of 5

    Nicolas

  29. 4 out of 5

    Wong Nicole

  30. 5 out of 5

    Alexander

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.