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L'obsolescence programmée de nos sentiments

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Lui, il s'appelle Ulysse. Il est veuf depuis plusieurs années et lorsqu'il perd son travail de déménageur, à 59 ans, une grande solitude s'empare de lui. Impossible même de s'entourer de ses enfants : sa fille est morte dans un accident à l'âge de 16 ans et son fils est très pris par son travail. Elle, c'est Mme Solenza. Méditerranée de son prénom, 62 ans au compteur. Ancie Lui, il s'appelle Ulysse. Il est veuf depuis plusieurs années et lorsqu'il perd son travail de déménageur, à 59 ans, une grande solitude s'empare de lui. Impossible même de s'entourer de ses enfants : sa fille est morte dans un accident à l'âge de 16 ans et son fils est très pris par son travail. Elle, c'est Mme Solenza. Méditerranée de son prénom, 62 ans au compteur. Ancien modèle (elle a fait la couverture de Lui dans sa jeunesse !), elle ne s'est jamais mariée et tient la fromagerie de sa mère qui vient de décéder après une longue maladie. Si leurs jours s'écoulent tristement et leurs occupations ne suffisent pas à masquer l'isolement qui est le leur, c'était sans compter un miracle émotionnel. Car entre cette femme et cet homme va se tisser une histoire d'amour d'autant plus belle qu'elle est tardive, et merveilleusement porteuse d'avenir...


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Lui, il s'appelle Ulysse. Il est veuf depuis plusieurs années et lorsqu'il perd son travail de déménageur, à 59 ans, une grande solitude s'empare de lui. Impossible même de s'entourer de ses enfants : sa fille est morte dans un accident à l'âge de 16 ans et son fils est très pris par son travail. Elle, c'est Mme Solenza. Méditerranée de son prénom, 62 ans au compteur. Ancie Lui, il s'appelle Ulysse. Il est veuf depuis plusieurs années et lorsqu'il perd son travail de déménageur, à 59 ans, une grande solitude s'empare de lui. Impossible même de s'entourer de ses enfants : sa fille est morte dans un accident à l'âge de 16 ans et son fils est très pris par son travail. Elle, c'est Mme Solenza. Méditerranée de son prénom, 62 ans au compteur. Ancien modèle (elle a fait la couverture de Lui dans sa jeunesse !), elle ne s'est jamais mariée et tient la fromagerie de sa mère qui vient de décéder après une longue maladie. Si leurs jours s'écoulent tristement et leurs occupations ne suffisent pas à masquer l'isolement qui est le leur, c'était sans compter un miracle émotionnel. Car entre cette femme et cet homme va se tisser une histoire d'amour d'autant plus belle qu'elle est tardive, et merveilleusement porteuse d'avenir...

30 review for L'obsolescence programmée de nos sentiments

  1. 5 out of 5

    PattyMacDotComma

    3.5~4★ “You know, Mediterranea, I can’t get my head around the fact that now . . . you’re the oldest Solenza.” Trust a younger brother to cheer you up! This is an interesting and timely graphic novel. The characters are recognisable, normal, everyday people of older middle age you could easily know. They have both hit bitter reality checks and are having trouble dealing with life. Mediterranea’s mother has just died, and she, not her brother, is the one who has been caring for her, so now, she’s n 3.5~4★ “You know, Mediterranea, I can’t get my head around the fact that now . . . you’re the oldest Solenza.” Trust a younger brother to cheer you up! This is an interesting and timely graphic novel. The characters are recognisable, normal, everyday people of older middle age you could easily know. They have both hit bitter reality checks and are having trouble dealing with life. Mediterranea’s mother has just died, and she, not her brother, is the one who has been caring for her, so now, she’s not only grieving but she’s feeling the weight of age herself. Mind you, she’s only 61, hardly over the hill. Illustration of her brother reminding her she’s the oldest in the family now She heads for home, and the weather and the night aren’t doing much to cheer her up. Illustration of her waiting for the bus on a dark, wet night On board the bus, a woman tells her child “you need to give up your seat for old folks.” Boy, that hurts! We also meet Ulysses, a long-haul truckdriver who is being retrenched at 57. Illustration of Ulysses ‘handing in’ his keys in anger He makes excuses to be in the neighbourhood to say hello and tries to pretend to his mates that he’s enjoying his forced retirement. Illustration of Ulysses with his truckie friends Meanwhile, Mediterranea, who used to be a girlie model, checks out every sag and bag and wrinkle. She’s sure not the girl she used to be, and it saddens her. Illustration of Mediterranea inspecting herself in the mirror I have chosen only discreet illustrations to give a sense of the realism of the story. The author and artist pull no punches. They know where people bulge and wrinkle roughly as they age and how worrying it can be, and they show it warts and all, the whole glorious body. Meanwhile, Ulysses is doing his best, or his worst, depending on your point of view, to pass the time. Daytime TV, evening sudoku, walks in the park. He makes excuses to chat to the cashier in the supermarket just to have someone to talk to. Illustration of Ulysses walking through the park without stopping to chat We also see, in pretty graphic detail, Ulysses making his regular visit to his “comfort woman”, as she’s referred to later in the book. She’s a younger woman with a picture of her family by the bed! It’s not loving sex, but she seems fond of him and manages to give him a little relief, so to speak. We see her a little later in the story, where she’s also shown as a very real person, not just some sex object. We know Ulysses and Mediterranea have to meet, of course. That’s why we’re still reading! It happens when she is visiting her gynaecologist, and it turns out that Ulysses is in the same waiting room also waiting for the doctor – his son. Illustration of meeting at the doctor’s office They begin chatting, and she mentions she runs a cheese shop. The inevitable happens, he visits the shop, they become friendly and start flirting a bit and going out a bit and he finds out she was the equivalent of a Playboy bunny in France, and one thing leads to another and we have quite a different sort of bedroom scene. Several of them, all very lovingly drawn, with less and less detail and more and more gentle blurring of the wrinkles and warts and all. Illustration of some love scenes graduating from full colour to charcoal and chalk sketches There is a lot of story, back story, history, shared memories of songs and events, wine and cheese and music and fun. There’s a lot of teasing about their names and what they mean. It’s more than a superficial glance at loneliness, it’s a heartfelt CONGRATULATIONS! to anyone who’s been brave enough to risk connecting with someone new at any age. Also, Ulysses mentions at their first meeting that he hates reading, which reminds me of the importance of graphic novels. There must be millions of people who love stories and would enjoy a book like this while they would never read pages full of only words. I enjoyed it very much. I hope the few illustrations I’ve shared will give you a sense of the depth of the story and the love that has obviously gone into producing it. I did find some of the translation a little awkward and the songs unfamiliar, which made me feel like an outsider at the party sometimes. But it's a graphic novel, so the pictures make up for it, and overall, I like it. Thanks to NetGalley and Europe Comics for the preview copy which is available as Read Now on NetGalley. If you’ve not tried a graphic novel before, I suggest you have a look.

  2. 4 out of 5

    David Schaafsma

    Middle-aged Belgian Zidrou’s short graphic novel, illustrated by Aimee De Jongh, is a romance about finding love in late middle-aged. The French-language title, translates to The Programmed Obsolescence of Our Feelings, which is kind of a boring way of saying the point, that we don’t expect love to happen with the intensity of youth, but hey, why not? When I taught high school the librarian had lost her husband in a tornado decades before. She, in her early fifties had never married again, but t Middle-aged Belgian Zidrou’s short graphic novel, illustrated by Aimee De Jongh, is a romance about finding love in late middle-aged. The French-language title, translates to The Programmed Obsolescence of Our Feelings, which is kind of a boring way of saying the point, that we don’t expect love to happen with the intensity of youth, but hey, why not? When I taught high school the librarian had lost her husband in a tornado decades before. She, in her early fifties had never married again, but then suddenly met this guy that made her heart go pitter patter and she talked to me about how unexpected it was to once again feel like this obsessive hormonal schoolgirl. I thought, even in my twenties when it happened, that it was delightful. Anyway, like a lot of romances, this book is kind of a fairy tale. Ulysses’s wife Penelope dies and he has not much to do. He doesn’t like to read, though he has a copy of Ulysses sitting around, eh. Now, you expect him to read it, don’t you?! But this is still a “journey” story, okay, but are there any new journies for the old man to go on? Ulysses meets Mediterranea (!!), who recently lost her mother and runs a cheese shop after her father died. Oh, and she used be a nude model, so this ups the ante in the “romance” department, though they both have age-appropriate bodies, so it’s not unrealistic in that respect. But speaking of realism, there IS very much a complete surprise as the relationship develops, but I take that to be in keeping with the “fairy tale” aspect of it all. I like the lovely art more than the story, but I did like it well enough overall. Oh, he doesn’t read it, though, which I was kind of glad about, actually.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jane

    This is a bittersweet little story. As I was reading, first I felt sad, then hopeful, then kind of sad again. I think this might be one of those ones that is just as deep as you want it to be. You could find an endless pool of insight here, or it could be a fluffy fun read. For me it was enjoyable enough, and it's stuck in my mind for a while since I finished reading it, so it must have struck some chord, though it didn't feel overly memorable as I was reading it. 3 stars for this one. Thank you t This is a bittersweet little story. As I was reading, first I felt sad, then hopeful, then kind of sad again. I think this might be one of those ones that is just as deep as you want it to be. You could find an endless pool of insight here, or it could be a fluffy fun read. For me it was enjoyable enough, and it's stuck in my mind for a while since I finished reading it, so it must have struck some chord, though it didn't feel overly memorable as I was reading it. 3 stars for this one. Thank you to NetGalley and Europe Comics for providing me with a DRC of this book.

  4. 5 out of 5

    ♥ Sandi ❣

    5 stars Thanks to NetGalley and Europe Comics for allowing me to read and review this graphic ARC. Publishes March 20, 2019. Such a wonderful open graphic, written with flare in a European style. The author, Zidrou, actually Benoît Drousie of Brussels, has brought a wonderful story to light with an abundance of human emotions, open to the thoughts and actions of middle aged adults. European Comics is definitely more unimpeded in their views of sex than we are here in the States, but this graphic 5 stars Thanks to NetGalley and Europe Comics for allowing me to read and review this graphic ARC. Publishes March 20, 2019. Such a wonderful open graphic, written with flare in a European style. The author, Zidrou, actually Benoît Drousie of Brussels, has brought a wonderful story to light with an abundance of human emotions, open to the thoughts and actions of middle aged adults. European Comics is definitely more unimpeded in their views of sex than we are here in the States, but this graphic was done in very good taste. Aimée de Jongh, born in the Netherlands, and an accomplished figure in Dutch comics, has brought forth a sterling illustration of the characters in this story. Depicting the main characters, both in youth and middle age, brought life to this story. The story is two middle aged singles who find each other accidentally in the 'autumn' of life. We become voyeurs as their romance grows. Throughout this short story we see death, love and the miracle of new life.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Swaroop

    A beautifully illustrated graphic novel about old age, loneliness and falling in love. It's about hope and also that it is never too late to fall in love. The story and characters leaves you with a nice, warm, hope-filled feeling and smile...

  6. 4 out of 5

    MissBecka

    That was weird and a fair bit more depressing than I expected. The illustrations were fantastic and honest in the details with many wonderful one liners to be found throughout. Thank you NetGalley and Europe Comics for this DRC. That was weird and a fair bit more depressing than I expected. The illustrations were fantastic and honest in the details with many wonderful one liners to be found throughout. Thank you NetGalley and Europe Comics for this DRC.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Moi Baltazar

    "The body gives up faster than the soul. Time wrinkles it, wounds it, debases it... Varicose veins, menopause... Time makes it a caricature. The body plays along, a good sport."

  8. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    There are so many romances about young love. This is a romance about old love. Or rather, a romance about people in their late 50s, early 60s who are in love. Ulysses who has been forced to retire early and Mediterranean, who has spent a long time watching her mother die. Both adrift, they find each other. Being European, the author is from Brussels and the illustrator from the Netherlands, they are open about showing bodies in all their glory, and in this case, all their wrinkled glory. This is a There are so many romances about young love. This is a romance about old love. Or rather, a romance about people in their late 50s, early 60s who are in love. Ulysses who has been forced to retire early and Mediterranean, who has spent a long time watching her mother die. Both adrift, they find each other. Being European, the author is from Brussels and the illustrator from the Netherlands, they are open about showing bodies in all their glory, and in this case, all their wrinkled glory. This is all tastefully done, but would still be NSFW in most offices. A most enjoyable romance. Highly recommend it. Thanks to Netgalley for making this book available for an honest review.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Mitticus

    +Digital ARC gently provided by Netgalley+ Graphic novel Art - 3.5 / 5 Story - 1 / 5 There are many things in the story that rubs me the wrong way, so... it's not of my liking. And since this is just my personal taste, well, that. Blossoms in Autumn, -which in French is called "The programmed obsolescence of our sentiments"- is about two aging people who know each other and get together. Ullyses with 59 years is lay off from a moving company, the loneliness and emptiness of his days is well told. Whi +Digital ARC gently provided by Netgalley+ Graphic novel Art - 3.5 / 5 Story - 1 / 5 There are many things in the story that rubs me the wrong way, so... it's not of my liking. And since this is just my personal taste, well, that. Blossoms in Autumn, -which in French is called "The programmed obsolescence of our sentiments"- is about two aging people who know each other and get together. Ullyses with 59 years is lay off from a moving company, the loneliness and emptiness of his days is well told. While Mediterranea, with 62 years, still works in a cheese factory, she is going through her own crisis of loneliness after the death of her mother whom she cared for. Newsflash - Life does not end at 50, or at 60. And I must say (coming from a family that mostly lives after the 90s and a hundred years) not even after that. And yes, they still have sex in some cases. I mean, my maternal grandfather was a hardworking , mean, and lecherous man until the day he died at 96 years old. But it is Ulysses wich bother me. He repeats again and again that 'he hate reading'. STRIKE ONE. I don't know if that hints at problems like dyslexia? but srly? not good. I guess that with the fairy tales, the SnowWhite bit and the apple, hints to lost opportunities or something like that. Or waiting too much for something to happen and grasp the Now. The 'they live happily forever'?. But it was weird , specially that ending (view spoiler)[with the row machine, to me is like that something never happen, after the bleeding probable she has ovary cancer and that pregnancy was wishful thinking and Mediterranea see her opportunity to have children ending. But we know that women don't need to get married to have children, nor even get pregnant. (hide spoiler)] That point , add with the frankly masculine point of view of the thing... with the female friend ... the woman he pays for sex when the photograph of the family beside the bed (really?), and she feels sad because Ulysses leaves her (really?) . Just not believable. Also the behaviour of the guy, with the magazine and crass opennings, and the thing with cheese in her hair? Nope , nope, nope. Not of my liking indeed.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Marianne

    Blossoms in Autumn is a graphic novel by Zidrou. It is illustrated by Aimee de Jongh. Mediterranea and Ulysses are both grieving. Ulysses Varennes, at fifty-nine, has been retrenched from his job as a removalist. Sixty-one-year-old Mediterranea Solenza has just lost her mother after nine months of devoted care. Life for both of them is suddenly emptier. And each has been rudely made aware of their advancing age. Mediterranea has her cheese shop, but the tactics Ulysses employs to fill his day ar Blossoms in Autumn is a graphic novel by Zidrou. It is illustrated by Aimee de Jongh. Mediterranea and Ulysses are both grieving. Ulysses Varennes, at fifty-nine, has been retrenched from his job as a removalist. Sixty-one-year-old Mediterranea Solenza has just lost her mother after nine months of devoted care. Life for both of them is suddenly emptier. And each has been rudely made aware of their advancing age. Mediterranea has her cheese shop, but the tactics Ulysses employs to fill his day are less than successful. They first encounter each other in a doctor’s surgery waiting room. Ulysses has been a widower for some fourteen years, while Mediterranea has never married. But now, something blossoms between them. And that’s not the only surprise they’re in for. It is said that a picture is worth a thousand words. In a graphic novel, the text might be minimal, but what is conveyed by the illustrations is probably immeasurable. Aimee de Jongh’s art work is detailed and evocative, expressing a myriad of emotions and feelings. The message in this charming book seems to be that life need not end with a loved one’s passing or the end of a career. The text offers plenty of perceptive observations about life and love and getting older; there’s a bit of nudity; there’s humour, sadness and joy. This is an insightful, sweet and moving story. This unbiased review is from an uncorrected proof copy provided by NetGalley and Europe Comics.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Richard

    I was truly moved by this story. It is a boy meets girl romance with a twist. For nine months the woman (61) has been nursing and caring for her dying mother. With her passing she becomes the head of the family and feels her age; unmarried, childless, there she seems little prospect for her life and looking at her sagging body she feels her time has been and gone. Meanwhile, the man, (60 ish) is tired from his years moving other people’s belongings. The financial downturn has left fewer house move I was truly moved by this story. It is a boy meets girl romance with a twist. For nine months the woman (61) has been nursing and caring for her dying mother. With her passing she becomes the head of the family and feels her age; unmarried, childless, there she seems little prospect for her life and looking at her sagging body she feels her time has been and gone. Meanwhile, the man, (60 ish) is tired from his years moving other people’s belongings. The financial downturn has left fewer house moves and more economic solutions found to save homeowners money. Hire a van, get mates to help out. Who needs an expensive professional service? Because of such realities the removers need to cut back its workforce, the old guy loses his job and is forced into the inactivity of early retirement. Washed up and no longer with a routine to his day. All things change when a meeting of two lonely souls shows there is life in these old dogs yet. but can real love blossom in later life? I absolutely adored this funny and moving tale that resonated on so many levels with the attitudes of society. Not only did the words make sense and real people were identified in the characters. Their life situations were believable both in despair and renewed hope. So, we are invited to see older people differently, that are still able to show affection, share difficult times in their past and embrace a possible future which just weeks before seemed impossible to contemplate. The cartoon drawings are on another level, as they lift the story onto another level. It becomes all-consuming and allows in its candid reality and the reflection of wrinkles to remove the thought of elderly relationships as unnatural. Where younger people might feel anything is inappropriate beyond falling asleep in front of the TV and perhaps holding hands. The text here combined with illustrations make the man and the woman just like any human beings, not just capable of love but unable to be anything other than a sensual couple. A real fillip for showing that 60 is the new 40 and a celebration of life. I was delighted to not only read this comic book but to become lost in the illustrated world of two people who when not looking for anything special found that something extra that changes a grin into a smile and that twinge into a flutter. A must read and a genuine life affirming graphic novel that justifies this form of literature and demonstrates storytelling suits any medium. But when words and pictures join in such synchronicity as they do here, there is no better way to get that story across.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Brown Girl Reading

    This graphic novel surprised me with it's fairytale ambiance. The main characters are sixty year olds and that's refreshingly rare. Why don't we have more stories with main characters that are over 50? Anyway this graphic novel has wonderful artwork and great story telling, in spite of the the ending which isn't very realistic but an interesting touch. I still loved it. It's mainly about getting old and how it effects people differently. It's also about falling in love when you believe that it i This graphic novel surprised me with it's fairytale ambiance. The main characters are sixty year olds and that's refreshingly rare. Why don't we have more stories with main characters that are over 50? Anyway this graphic novel has wonderful artwork and great story telling, in spite of the the ending which isn't very realistic but an interesting touch. I still loved it. It's mainly about getting old and how it effects people differently. It's also about falling in love when you believe that it is no longer in the cards. All in all it's a love story that will encourage us all to keep looking for love and showing us it can fall right in front of you when you least expect it. There is some nudity in this graphic novel so if that bothers you you may want to give it a miss, but otherwise it's a quick, sweet story that I will probably read again.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

    The French-language title, translated literally, is The Programmed Obsolescence of Our Feelings. (Talk about highfalutin!) Both that and the English title defy the notion that we become less capable of true love and growth the older we are – as will be dramatized through the story of a later-life romance between the two main characters. Ulysses Varennes, a 59-year-old widower who retired early from his career as a mover, hates books (gasp!) because moving boxes of them ruined his back (he even r The French-language title, translated literally, is The Programmed Obsolescence of Our Feelings. (Talk about highfalutin!) Both that and the English title defy the notion that we become less capable of true love and growth the older we are – as will be dramatized through the story of a later-life romance between the two main characters. Ulysses Varennes, a 59-year-old widower who retired early from his career as a mover, hates books (gasp!) because moving boxes of them ruined his back (he even refuses to read them!). Mediterranea Solenza, coming up on 62, was a nude model in her prime and is now a cheese-maker. At the book’s opening she has just laid her mother to rest, and her affair with Ulysses serves as a chance at a new life that somehow counterbalances the loss. We come to understand the characters through the sadness of their past but also through their hopeful future, both of which are encompassed by the metaphor of a Homeric journey (Ulysses, get it?). Indeed, the book takes an unusual turn I never would have expected; if it beggars belief, it is at least touching. Zidrou is a Belgian comics writer and Aimée de Jongh is a Dutch-born illustrator. She portrays these ageing bodies sensitively but realistically, retreating into an appropriately impressionistic style for the spreads that show their actual lovemaking. In a nice touch, the first two words and last two words of the book are exactly the same.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Ije the Devourer of Books

    I loved this. It is a beautiful story about a widower who is made redundant at 59. He then has to find a new way of living and he struggles but copes. He then bumps into a 62 year old former model who runs her own cheese shop and a friendship develops between the two of them. And as the friendship deepens love emerges and the two of them decide to grasp all that life still has to offer them and they do this despite the moaning of the man's son and daughter in law and why not? Why should older peop I loved this. It is a beautiful story about a widower who is made redundant at 59. He then has to find a new way of living and he struggles but copes. He then bumps into a 62 year old former model who runs her own cheese shop and a friendship develops between the two of them. And as the friendship deepens love emerges and the two of them decide to grasp all that life still has to offer them and they do this despite the moaning of the man's son and daughter in law and why not? Why should older people be written off as if they can't still live, love and enjoy what the world has to offer. I must say that this kind of negativity towards age is prevalent in global North cultures but less so elsewhere. I have never seen negative attitudes towards age in West Africa and instead age is actually revered. (In my experience at least). The story provides a beautiful perspective on what is possible and why we should continue to embrace love throughout our lives. The artwork was lovely with simple graphics that conveyed the story in a gentle but yet powerful way. I loved this story so much that I am going to buy myself a paperback copy for my own collection. This is a lovely story for anyone who enjoys romance with their graphic novels. Copy provided by Europe Comics via Netgalley in exchange for an unbiased review.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Etienne

    This was better then what I expected!! This isn't about old people naked like the cover made me think, this book is about two older persons (59 and 62... I think) who are searching for a reason to continue living and then finding one. This is a book about love, about life, about getting old and I find myself deeply touch by it. I'm no way near that age (I'm 31 has I read it), but I see the future me in those characters and it made me thing a lot about getting old, without kid and all that came w This was better then what I expected!! This isn't about old people naked like the cover made me think, this book is about two older persons (59 and 62... I think) who are searching for a reason to continue living and then finding one. This is a book about love, about life, about getting old and I find myself deeply touch by it. I'm no way near that age (I'm 31 has I read it), but I see the future me in those characters and it made me thing a lot about getting old, without kid and all that came with it. The illustrations where also beautiful so it help getting into the story. A big surprise and a great book! Love it!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Skirmish

    Book Reaction: https://nildivision.blogspot.com/2019... Rating: 3 Stars – not exactly setting my world on fire but I liked it I received a copy of Blossoms In Autumn from Europe Comics via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. Book Reaction: https://nildivision.blogspot.com/2019... Rating: 3 Stars – not exactly setting my world on fire but I liked it I received a copy of Blossoms In Autumn from Europe Comics via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Loredana (Bookinista08)

    ***ARC found on NetGalley, so many thanks for this opportunity to read and enjoy this graphic novel!*** This was such a lovely surprise for me! Apart from the ending, which was too good to be true (though I admit it is not impossible in real life), the whole of this graphic novel was crazy good! So refreshing to read about the life and love story of two almost-old people. It's something that does exist, but is almost never portrayed in films or books or songs. It should! It's just a stage in life ***ARC found on NetGalley, so many thanks for this opportunity to read and enjoy this graphic novel!*** This was such a lovely surprise for me! Apart from the ending, which was too good to be true (though I admit it is not impossible in real life), the whole of this graphic novel was crazy good! So refreshing to read about the life and love story of two almost-old people. It's something that does exist, but is almost never portrayed in films or books or songs. It should! It's just a stage in life after all. :) The story was minimalistic, I guess, but it went really well with the theme of the novel. However, the art was gorgeous! Not lush, but very detailed and close to life. I found myself looking at those frames with rain and water minutes on end. I just loved it, it was my kind of graphic art. To wrap up things nicely, I have to say I'm glad I stumbled upon this story. It has some sad moments, but overall it is a very good and realistic portrayal of growing old. And growing old does not necessarily have to be painful. That is just another cliche that this society is force-feeding us. :)

  18. 4 out of 5

    Elle♣

    3 stars *Thank you to the author and Netgalley for giving me an ARC in exchange for an honest review* An interesting graphic novel. I thought it was okay, just not my kind of thing. It was pretty bleak.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Marcel Driel

    Bought it for the art, stayed for the story. A beautiful look at love at a later age and how our body ages faster than our mind and soul.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Shazia

    A beautifully illustrated graphic novel with a somewhat underwhelming story line. I did like the aspect of two older people meeting and falling in love. However, the meeting and progression of the relationship seemed a bit rushed and unrealistic to me, along with an unexpected situation that is revealed toward the end of the story.

  21. 4 out of 5

    xueh wei

    I found this a really interesting read that deals with facing the realities of old age, not the most popular topic I'd say. The protagonists in this story finds new love towards the end of their lives, and they find comfort in one another. The art is absolutely lovely, and I enjoyed this more than I'd expected to! Actual rating: 3.5 *I received this copy through Netgalley in return for an honest review.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Deviki

    I'm always reading random comics and I've always loved a slice of life or realistic type of stories especially in comics because most of what you (or at least I) see in comics for the most part is superhero comics, that is dominating the "industry" not that I'm complaining but just stating an observation. I love this one a lot, mainly because we always read so many books on young love that we often forget about the older generation, they too need love and attention like the younger generations. I'm always reading random comics and I've always loved a slice of life or realistic type of stories especially in comics because most of what you (or at least I) see in comics for the most part is superhero comics, that is dominating the "industry" not that I'm complaining but just stating an observation. I love this one a lot, mainly because we always read so many books on young love that we often forget about the older generation, they too need love and attention like the younger generations. I liked how the story started out with Ulysses not the most common name I've ever read a 59-year-old widower who was forced into retirement because his moving company was downsizing. It's sad because he wasn't ready to let go of his job. The thing about the older generation, most of them usually work in "one" job for a long period of time that when they retire (at the right time) they usually don't find loneliness too jarring because they are only trying to live out their "last" remaining years, even better if they have a significant other with them. But in Ulysses case, he lost his wife a long time back and being forced to face this retirement alone, he is feeling depressed as reality set in. As for his long years working in one job, Ulysses is not sure if he can do anything else to overcome that loneliness. Because being old in a fast moving technology dominant era is scary and uncountable. I'm kind of scared I will end up like him though...... So one day while waiting for his son to finish up with his appointments in his clinic, he meets 62-year-old Solenza who runs a cheese shop. She too is feeling lonely after her mother's passing and having not married, she does not have any grandchildren to play with or spend her remaining golden years with. After Ulysses and Solenza met, they started to have a mutual attraction with each other. OMG, that is sooooo sweet.......First they develop a quick friendship and then it blossom into a romance ......I like how Ulysses is still cheeky after all this years, especially after Solenza tells him of her former occupation as a nude model. LOL !! OMG, i totally love their lil flirts and cute teasing.......ugh so sweet !!! I was kind of shocked that Solenza gotten her period right after she kissed him LOL .......Dear Lord the hormones !!! AND THE PROPOSAL !! SO romantic !!!!!!!!! Ugh, I immediately disliked Ulysses daughter in law, bitch is not easy to find anyone in your golden age especially when everyone is so disconnected with everyone else. You better hope your husband don't leave your sorry arse behind !! Humph!! I like how the artist is able to capture all the old features and wrinkles beautifully. Even the sex scene is not raunchy but rather it was almost like a poetic love making HAHAHAH wth am I saying OH, the surprised reveal at the end was so sweet!! It was indeed a miracle LOL. I'm glad they decided to keep it and move away to a nicer place.......It was such a second chance in life happy ending .....I love it !! I felt like I was smiling the whole time i was reading the comic. It was so cute and ahhhh moment. You know I really wish someday I will find someone like this too.......if not as lovers but at least as a good friends that I can spend the rest of my life with :) A companion of my age that appreciate life, traveling and growing old together :) If I must point out something I didn't like, it will be the paying for sex with one of his ex co-worker's wife thing. I'm pretty sure he has no idea his wife is doing that on the side. She might be doing it for money or for whatever reason ..... it is still not cool to do that with someone's wife...especially if you have worked with that person for years. I find that quite disturbing and now I wonder if every men does that because of sexual urges ?? That one kind of messed me up a bit. This comic has cleverly capture all the growing old and falling in love moments beautifully :) This comic remind me of "Major Pettigrew's Last Stand" because that elderly second story was just as amazing to read !! I love the artwork and the colors used in this comic, I noticed the whole comic uses faded and softer colors to design this story. I think it gives it a more aged, elegance and mature feel to the comics..... I love it !!! Beautiful artwork !!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Paty Pana

    I was greatly disappointed by this book for several reasons. But let's start by the one thing I really enjoyed. The art was very beautiful and I admired the illustrations at each panel. It was unique, and did its part on adding to the story succesfully. However there were so many things I didn't like, unfortunately. To begin with, I personally can't stand graphic content in books when I am not warned about it, and even more when they have no place in the story. I am not reading erotica so I am not I was greatly disappointed by this book for several reasons. But let's start by the one thing I really enjoyed. The art was very beautiful and I admired the illustrations at each panel. It was unique, and did its part on adding to the story succesfully. However there were so many things I didn't like, unfortunately. To begin with, I personally can't stand graphic content in books when I am not warned about it, and even more when they have no place in the story. I am not reading erotica so I am not happy when I see detailed illustrations of a sexual scene in my book. This isn't the stuff I like to read, and if I had been reding this book in public I'd be even more disappointed. As for the plot, I found big connection holes and I couldn't understand how the story moved from the one part to the other, actually some parts seemed to irrelevant at times. For me, some parts didn't make clear sense and I could only rely on my imagination to understand specific parts. Maybe it was intentional? A trick to keep the reader wondering? I don't know but sadly it didn't work for me. Lastly, I can't omit mentioning that the format I received through NetGalley was faulty. Maybe this is a part of the process, but since the book is already published now I expected it to be free or editing problems. The main problem I faced was that the letter "l" often disappeared in the text, and as a result it made reading very inconvenient. To conclude, if the book was longer, and hadn't it been a review copy, I would strongly consider not finishing it at all.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Valéria.

    It started really nice, the beginning was interesting, kind of poetic and I was waiting when the two of them are going to meet. Then they met. They fell in love. They had sex. To this point, it was a nice romance story about two old folks, kind and funny. And then, I don't know if the author got hit or something, (view spoiler)[but Mediterranea getting pregnant in her 62 years, nope. That ruined it for me, completely. (hide spoiler)] Besides that, I did not find it extraordinary in any way, it w It started really nice, the beginning was interesting, kind of poetic and I was waiting when the two of them are going to meet. Then they met. They fell in love. They had sex. To this point, it was a nice romance story about two old folks, kind and funny. And then, I don't know if the author got hit or something, (view spoiler)[but Mediterranea getting pregnant in her 62 years, nope. That ruined it for me, completely. (hide spoiler)] Besides that, I did not find it extraordinary in any way, it was just a nicely written and drawn story.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Kayla

    Blossoms in Autumn is a heart warming, unique story that that tells the story of love at an old age. Mediterranea has become the oldest member of her family after the death of her mother. Ulysses is forced into retirement after his company “downsizes”. Both are dealing with the effects of society thinking they are too old. They find eachother and decided to spend their days being “old” together with a few surprises along the way.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Rogene Carter

    A very philosophical and entertaining look at aging and sudden miracles that can change your whole life.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth Tabler

    Thank you to the author and Netgalley for providing me with a copy of this in exchange for my open and honest review. I am very taken by this story. Distilled down, this is a story of boy meets girl. However, it is so much more than that. The premise follows two characters who are in the autumn of their lives. The first is Ulysses. He is in his sixties and has just recently been forcibly retired. The once very active Ulysses is now at a loss about how to move on with his life. Mediterranea recen Thank you to the author and Netgalley for providing me with a copy of this in exchange for my open and honest review. I am very taken by this story. Distilled down, this is a story of boy meets girl. However, it is so much more than that. The premise follows two characters who are in the autumn of their lives. The first is Ulysses. He is in his sixties and has just recently been forcibly retired. The once very active Ulysses is now at a loss about how to move on with his life. Mediterranea recently lost her mother after being her sole caretaker for the last nine months. Mediterranea runs a cheese store inherited from her father, again she is at a bit of a loss in knowing what to do at this point in her life. At a chance encounter at Ulysses sons OB/GYN office, the two of them spark a romance. The writing about romance is so on point. It isn’t forced and hackneyed. It is sweet with heat. Chemistry bubbles between them. It feels like a fresh and real love affair. Love that can blossom in the Autumn of their lives. Graphically this is fantastic. The panels have a misty quality to them, and the characters are drawn well. The art is enough to make me want to read more of this authors work. It is a life-affirming and wonderful love story that has a great twist of an ending and should be read. You don’t come by comics like this often.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Kaitlin Mooney

    I picked up this graphic novel in Angoulême at the Museum and Library of Comics bookstore. Its in french, and after spending some time in france and realizing I couldn't even master saying "Sorry I don't speak French" in french I know that I don't know french. However there is something universal about graphic novels and the subject matter of old* people having sex really interested me. I am just trying to find out what my body is going to look like so I am not surprised. The story is conveyed b I picked up this graphic novel in Angoulême at the Museum and Library of Comics bookstore. Its in french, and after spending some time in france and realizing I couldn't even master saying "Sorry I don't speak French" in french I know that I don't know french. However there is something universal about graphic novels and the subject matter of old* people having sex really interested me. I am just trying to find out what my body is going to look like so I am not surprised. The story is conveyed beautifully and I don't think anyone would have any trouble understanding the meaning despite the language barrier. I was not thrilled by the ending, but it was a surprise and to be surprised by the book you are reading is always a good thing. This is a story that I am glad I can revisit as I travel through my life. **I don't actually think 62 year olds are old people, they're just people

  29. 4 out of 5

    Maxine

    Graphic novel Blossoms in Autumn is a sweet and charming story about two lonely people who find love and romance in the autumn of their lives. The book is a gentle reminder that life and love don't have to end just because we enter our Golden Years. The book is published by Europe Comics and is written by Zidrou who is a master of stories about the human condition, especially about those who have been marginalized by race, disability, or in this case, age. The art by Aimee de Jong is understated Graphic novel Blossoms in Autumn is a sweet and charming story about two lonely people who find love and romance in the autumn of their lives. The book is a gentle reminder that life and love don't have to end just because we enter our Golden Years. The book is published by Europe Comics and is written by Zidrou who is a master of stories about the human condition, especially about those who have been marginalized by race, disability, or in this case, age. The art by Aimee de Jong is understated and done mainly in soft greys, browns and white; it is lovely and complements the story beautifully. Thanks to Netgalley and Europe Comics for the opportunity to read this book in exchange for an honest review

  30. 4 out of 5

    Rita Sousa

    A very sweet story, with really good artwork! I didn't love the ending, but it was a heart warming (and quick) read, and the characters are very loveable. I'm slowly starting to get a bit into graphic novels. It's available on Netgalley, if you want something sweet and charming to read, this is the way to go! Content warning for nudity (if you're one of those people) and aging/death themes.

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