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An intersectional anthology of works by the known and unknown women that shaped and established the suffrage movement, in time for the 2020 centennial of women's right to vote, with a foreword by Gloria Steinem Comprised of historical texts spanning two centuries, The Women's Suffrage Movement is a comprehensive and singular volume with a distinctive focus on incorporating An intersectional anthology of works by the known and unknown women that shaped and established the suffrage movement, in time for the 2020 centennial of women's right to vote, with a foreword by Gloria Steinem Comprised of historical texts spanning two centuries, The Women's Suffrage Movement is a comprehensive and singular volume with a distinctive focus on incorporating race, class, and gender, and illuminating minority voices. This one-of-a-kind intersectional anthology features the writings of the most well-known suffragists, such as Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony, alongside accounts of those often overlooked because of their race, from Native American women to African American suffragists like Ida B. Wells and the three Forten sisters. At a time of enormous political and social upheaval, there could be no more important book than one that recognizes a group of exemplary women--in their own words--as they paved the way for future generations. The editor and introducer, Sally Roesch Wagner, is a pre-eminent scholar of the diverse backbone of the women's suffrage movement, the founding director of the Matilda Joslyn Gage Foundation, and serves on the New York State Women's Suffrage Commission.


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An intersectional anthology of works by the known and unknown women that shaped and established the suffrage movement, in time for the 2020 centennial of women's right to vote, with a foreword by Gloria Steinem Comprised of historical texts spanning two centuries, The Women's Suffrage Movement is a comprehensive and singular volume with a distinctive focus on incorporating An intersectional anthology of works by the known and unknown women that shaped and established the suffrage movement, in time for the 2020 centennial of women's right to vote, with a foreword by Gloria Steinem Comprised of historical texts spanning two centuries, The Women's Suffrage Movement is a comprehensive and singular volume with a distinctive focus on incorporating race, class, and gender, and illuminating minority voices. This one-of-a-kind intersectional anthology features the writings of the most well-known suffragists, such as Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony, alongside accounts of those often overlooked because of their race, from Native American women to African American suffragists like Ida B. Wells and the three Forten sisters. At a time of enormous political and social upheaval, there could be no more important book than one that recognizes a group of exemplary women--in their own words--as they paved the way for future generations. The editor and introducer, Sally Roesch Wagner, is a pre-eminent scholar of the diverse backbone of the women's suffrage movement, the founding director of the Matilda Joslyn Gage Foundation, and serves on the New York State Women's Suffrage Commission.

30 review for The Women's Suffrage Movement

  1. 4 out of 5

    Theresa

    Dr. Sally Roesch Wagner was one of the first PhD’s in Women’s Studies, writing her dissertation on Matilda Joslyn Gage (for whom she is the official biographer). She was also one of the founders of the Women’s Studies Program at California State University, Sacramento and the founder of the Gage Museum in Fayetteville, NY. Sally and I have been friends and colleagues for nearly fifty years, and it is with great pleasure that I introduce you to her newest book, The Women’s Suffrage Movement (publ Dr. Sally Roesch Wagner was one of the first PhD’s in Women’s Studies, writing her dissertation on Matilda Joslyn Gage (for whom she is the official biographer). She was also one of the founders of the Women’s Studies Program at California State University, Sacramento and the founder of the Gage Museum in Fayetteville, NY. Sally and I have been friends and colleagues for nearly fifty years, and it is with great pleasure that I introduce you to her newest book, The Women’s Suffrage Movement (published by Penguin and available March 2019). When I told a friend that I was reading The Women’s Suffrage Movement, my friend replied, “I would think that that subject had been exhausted by now, that nothing new could be said about the Suffrage Movement.” If you, like my friend, think we know all there is to know about the 19th century women’s movement, you are so wrong. Sally offers and analyzes information about feminism in the 19th century that has never been told before. When Sally was in graduate school she discovered that a neighbor in her home town in South Dakota was the granddaughter of Matilda Joslyn Gage and had her grandmother's papers and other historical documents in her attic. These materials opened a whole new view of the 19th century women’s movement (along with many years of original source research) which Sally shares with us in her new book. Sally was once asked in a job interview how she approached her work as a historian. She replied, “I talk to dead people.” And now thanks to Sally’s careful and insightful research, she allows us to do the same, with her astute and candid guidance and translation. Sally does what many historians fail to do: she presents us with original source materials (which she gives to us so we can draw our own conclusions); she aligns the stories with analysis but leaves judgement to us as readers and offers an intersectional view of history that includes actors often written out of mainstream history. While most feminist histories focus largely (or even entirely) on white women, this book examines the influences of indigenous women and the organizing of Black women including what was done prior to Seneca Falls. The metaphor most frequently used to describe the different generations of feminism is the wave. Nineteenth century was the first wave, 20th century the second wave and now is the third or fourth wave (depending upon the current interpretation). Sally, however, explains history not as a wave, implying non-differential movement in one direction, but rather as a puzzle with each unique piece developing a complete picture. Unfortunately most of us were taught a linear, white, patriarchal, fantasized version of US history. The puzzle metaphor explains that all participants are a piece and without each version of the story (puzzle) the picture is incomplete. One extremely important point that Sally makes early in the book is that what is termed the Suffrage Movement was about much more than the vote. Much like contemporary feminists, our foremothers were fighting for economic parity, married women’s property rights, freedom from violence, sexual liberty and many other parallel issues. Also like the current movement, feminism wasn’t monolithic. Deep divisions arose particularly around the levels of radicalism participants wanted to exhibit, the strategies for ending slavery (remember most early feminists were also abolitionists) and most importantly what principles and values would govern their actions. These conflicts resulted in splintering of organizations, unlikely alliances and racist tactics. Fortunately Sally dispels the bifurcated, “two-sides to the story” view of history in favor of the many sides. When members of organizations disagreed about strategies, they would often start new organizations to continue the fight, demonstrating that sometimes conflict clarifies and allows for theoretical growth. Having been involved in movement politics for the past fifty years, I saw many parallels between the 19th and 20th century movement. The current Women’s Movement continues to deal with issues like expediency vs. principles, radicalism vs. reform, racism, heterosexism, who speaks for the movement, the function of separatism, just to name a few. For that reason alone, it is important to learn our herstory, to learn what has come before us. One of the things I love most about Sally’s writing is how accessible it is. She does not get lost in academese. Her writing is straight forward, and she backs up her assertions with materials written at the time, including conflicting stories of the same events. Some years back, Sally wrote a book entitled A Time of Protest, about several social justice movements happening simultaneously in the 19th century (feminism, anti-slavery, labor, even animal rights) and I assigned it in my Women’s Studies classes. My students, many of whom groaned when told they would have to read a history book, loved Sally’s book. I predict students will have the same response to The Women’s Suffrage Movement. So whether you are a feminist wanting to know your roots, a history buff, an academic or someone interested in the development of movements, this book is for you. My bio: Theresa Corrigan is a professor emeritus from California State University, Sacramento who taught Women’s Studies for thirty years. She also owned and operated Lioness Books, Sacramento’s feminist bookstore, from 1980-2000 and was actively involved with the Feminist Bookstore Network.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Francesca Calarco

    If you are looking for a series of primary sources detailing the women’s suffrage movement from before the creation of the United States, to the ratification of the 19th Amendment in 1920, then this is a pretty solid reference book. Roesch is good at detailing the ebb and flow of the movement(s), including the internal skirmishes between the NWSA and AWSA, and later on the NAWSA and abolitionist groups. Perhaps most fascinating was how differences in approach and goals rising between notable fig If you are looking for a series of primary sources detailing the women’s suffrage movement from before the creation of the United States, to the ratification of the 19th Amendment in 1920, then this is a pretty solid reference book. Roesch is good at detailing the ebb and flow of the movement(s), including the internal skirmishes between the NWSA and AWSA, and later on the NAWSA and abolitionist groups. Perhaps most fascinating was how differences in approach and goals rising between notable figures like Susan B. Anthony, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, and Frederick Douglass also led to conflict (and drama). That said, before and after giving this timeline, Roesch was good about detailing how women of ethnic minorities groups had (and have) struggles that extended beyond the experiences of suffrage movement’s leading white figures. She is also good at detailing how black women (and men) were included and excluded at varying moments throughout this timeline. Where I feel she could have done better is to emphasize the challenges Native American women faced (as their battles involved fighting for human and citizenship recognition), as well as the struggles of immigrant women throughout this time period. For me at least, if a book titled The Women's Suffrage Movement wants to be inclusive, it aught at least extend its timeline to the Civil Rights Act (1964) and the Voting Rights Act (1965)—because for most women the 19th Amendment alone was an empty promise. Rating: 3.5 stars

  3. 4 out of 5

    Mattie

    This book was really disappointing. The majority of the book was old essays instead of original work from the author. I skipped all the essays and mostly skimmed through the rest because I felt like I wasn't gaining anything from this book. Books like these are so important but this was such a let down. If you want a collection of essays from the late 1800's and early 1900's this is the book for you, but otherwise I would not suggest you waste your time on this.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Casey Cep

    Reviewed this book and two others in an article for "The New Yorker." Here's the link: https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/20... Reviewed this book and two others in an article for "The New Yorker." Here's the link: https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/20...

  5. 5 out of 5

    Margaret

    This is a fantastic collection of primary documents from the women's suffrage movement in the United States, with excellent commentary from Dr. Sally Roesch Wagner. This is the only book I've read so far that places the beginnings of the woman's suffrage movement with the Iroquois Nation and their struggle to maintain the rights of their women while be subsumed by the white, patriarchal US culture. In every moment and every chapter of this book, Wagner points out the racism and sexism used in th This is a fantastic collection of primary documents from the women's suffrage movement in the United States, with excellent commentary from Dr. Sally Roesch Wagner. This is the only book I've read so far that places the beginnings of the woman's suffrage movement with the Iroquois Nation and their struggle to maintain the rights of their women while be subsumed by the white, patriarchal US culture. In every moment and every chapter of this book, Wagner points out the racism and sexism used in the movement, by pretty much every single major player. It's depressing that many of the white women in the movement could not see all women as human beings, regardless of race, sexual orientation, class, and way of life. Even Susan B. Anthony succumbed to the racism in the movement. The audiobook is read by the phenomenal Bahni Turpin. She's always a fantastic reader, but I did not find this an easy listen, and would've preferred to read it in print. It was difficult to remember the who/where/when as well as all the abbreviations for the women's groups that kept splintering off into new groups. It would've been helpful to flip back and forth to double-check things.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Dori Sabourin

    It is a conundrum to me how there are still women today who can't be bothered voting. These are the ones who complain bitterly about the state of affairs and the elected officials. Perhaps if they read Sally Roesch Wagner's The Suffrage Movement and learned of the struggle suffrages in this country endured to gain the right to vote, they would alter their attitude. The Suffrages:Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, Matilda Joslyn Gage, Frederick Douglass were among those who fought for suff It is a conundrum to me how there are still women today who can't be bothered voting. These are the ones who complain bitterly about the state of affairs and the elected officials. Perhaps if they read Sally Roesch Wagner's The Suffrage Movement and learned of the struggle suffrages in this country endured to gain the right to vote, they would alter their attitude. The Suffrages:Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, Matilda Joslyn Gage, Frederick Douglass were among those who fought for suffrage. They argued as men had done before them: no taxation without representation. One statement often reiterated was might makes right. And mighty were they from Seneca Falls in 1848 until the final ratification in 1920. Suffrages were imprisoned, even force fed, committed suicide, took chances with ill health, pickiteers were attacked and many other injustices committed against them. But then, those who can't be bothered to vote, probably can't be bothered to read any lierature as comprehensive as Sally Roesch Wagner's The Women's Suffrage Movement.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jill Rabideau

    Fantastic book reflecting on issues that impact women currently while looking back at first and second waves of feminism. Encouraging to think about productive anger today.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Hali Davidson

    Dense, but vital.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Dori Sabourin

    It is a conundrum to me how there are still women today who can't be bothered voting. These are the ones who complain bitterly about the state of affairs and the elected officials. Perhaps if they read Sally Roesch Wagner's The Suffrage Movement and learned of the struggle suffrages in this country endured to gain the right to vote, they would alter their attitude. The Suffrages:Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, Matilda Joslyn Gage, Frederick Douglass were among those who fought for suff It is a conundrum to me how there are still women today who can't be bothered voting. These are the ones who complain bitterly about the state of affairs and the elected officials. Perhaps if they read Sally Roesch Wagner's The Suffrage Movement and learned of the struggle suffrages in this country endured to gain the right to vote, they would alter their attitude. The Suffrages:Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, Matilda Joslyn Gage, Frederick Douglass were among those who fought for suffrage. They argued as men had done before them: no taxation without representation. One statement often reiterated was might makes right. And mighty were they from Seneca Falls in 1848 until the final ratification in 1920. Suffrages were imprisoned, even force fed, committed suicide, took chances with ill health, pickiteers were attacked and many other injustices committed against them. But then, those who can't be bothered to vote, probably can't be bothered to read any lierature as comprehensive as Sally Roesch Wagner's The Women's Suffrage Movement.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Olivia Chin

    I really enjoyed this foray into the history of the women's suffrage movement. However, I think the chapter about the Nineteenth Amendment finally being ratified was incomplete and negative in tone. While it is extremely disappointing and wrong that people still continued to be sexist and racist (black people could not fully exercise their rights to vote until the 1960s), the Nineteenth Amendment was at least a stepping stone to making the U.S. more progressive. This book left out the story of Ha I really enjoyed this foray into the history of the women's suffrage movement. However, I think the chapter about the Nineteenth Amendment finally being ratified was incomplete and negative in tone. While it is extremely disappointing and wrong that people still continued to be sexist and racist (black people could not fully exercise their rights to vote until the 1960s), the Nineteenth Amendment was at least a stepping stone to making the U.S. more progressive. This book left out the story of Harry T. Burn, who, with help from a suffragist letter from his mother, made Tennessee the final state to ratify the Nineteenth Amendment. Instead, this book focuses on the anti-suffragists and racists in Tennessee, completely omitting the name of Sue Shelton White (a Tennessee suffragist who burned Woodrow Wilson in effigy, spent time in jail for the cause, and then went on a train crusade around the south to get more women involved in the suffragist movement). Her actions are mentioned but remain nameless, even though she contributed greatly to the cause? I don't know why she was left out. I know it's easy to look at most of the people in the South during this time period and think they were awful (many were!) but there WERE some progressive people who were trying to fight for equality. By omitting the "good guys" from Tennessee's history, this book reduces Tennessee's involvement in making the Nineteenth Amendment a reality. As a feminist from Tennessee who has done extensive research on Tennessee suffragists, I was disappointed to find revisionist history in this book. I agree that we need to do better than our ancestors and that many involved in the suffragist movement were racist, sexist, or overly religiously zealous. I agree that we need to include the negative parts of history with the positive. But that's the thing: we need to have the positive included as well, and I'm afraid this book ended on a very discouraging note despite the fact that we are making continuous (if not slow and frustrating) progress. For more information on Tennessee's part in the suffragist movement: https://sos.tn.gov/products/tsla/wome... I'd also recommend the book "Votes For Women!: The Women's Suffrage Movement In Tennessee, The South, and The Nation" by Marjorie Spruill.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Laurel

    Great but long history of the movement from 1848 to 1920. I especially liked the intro by Gloria Steinem. The rest of the book is broken down by decade with chapters containing context and historical writings. The struggle among the women and the different rival groups they formed is clear. It's interesting to read about the many philosophies of how best to get the vote: partner with or oppose the abolitionists; target the vote at the state or federal level; aim for educational requirements; par Great but long history of the movement from 1848 to 1920. I especially liked the intro by Gloria Steinem. The rest of the book is broken down by decade with chapters containing context and historical writings. The struggle among the women and the different rival groups they formed is clear. It's interesting to read about the many philosophies of how best to get the vote: partner with or oppose the abolitionists; target the vote at the state or federal level; aim for educational requirements; partner with or oppose immigrant groups. Above all it is disheartening to read how men were willing to give anyone the vote before women, women still are not equal citizens, and women are losing ground. Much work to do.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Therese Wiese

    Five hundred pages of tiny print, so this is not the book you are probably going to sit and read cover to cover. But oh my goodness - what an incredible resource! Newspaper and magazine articles, speeches, correspondence, all spanning the 1840's to 1920. I have been reading a variety of books on suffrage because of the 100th anniversary of the 19th amendment, and have already found myself going back to this anthology and looking for new names I am finding. I received this book from the publisher Five hundred pages of tiny print, so this is not the book you are probably going to sit and read cover to cover. But oh my goodness - what an incredible resource! Newspaper and magazine articles, speeches, correspondence, all spanning the 1840's to 1920. I have been reading a variety of books on suffrage because of the 100th anniversary of the 19th amendment, and have already found myself going back to this anthology and looking for new names I am finding. I received this book from the publisher for an unbiased review. My only negative comment is that I wish the physical book had been just a little larger so that the print was not so small.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Yari

    I attend Syracuse University and Wagner was my professor last semester. We read the manuscript of this book and I can honestly say that my life is changed forever. All the knowledge, wisdom, facts, and stories that she provides her readers, like me, with is immense and she does so in a way that isn't boring or textbook like so anyone can read this. Definitely recommend it not just to historians or feminists but to anyone who likes to read. There's a lot that can be learned from this book.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    Such a fantastic read! (But definitely not a casual read.) I learned so very much and came to appreciate all the intersections of the suffrage movement. I both loved and didn't love the inclusion of all the source documents - I read some, skipped some. I'm glad I read this to kick off the suffrage centennial year!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Kelly Obernuefemann

    Great collection of sources. I love that it includes native women.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Shannon

    Absolutely fantastic, incredibly informative. This should be required reading for any feminist or anyone interested in the women’s suffrage movement. Sally Roesch Wagner has compiled a huge selection of primary documents written by people in the movement, and she has edited it to give us context. My favorite thing about this book is that Wagner is not afraid to show us the good, the bad, and the ugly. The women’s suffrage movement was seemingly endless, extremely challenging, and often full of d Absolutely fantastic, incredibly informative. This should be required reading for any feminist or anyone interested in the women’s suffrage movement. Sally Roesch Wagner has compiled a huge selection of primary documents written by people in the movement, and she has edited it to give us context. My favorite thing about this book is that Wagner is not afraid to show us the good, the bad, and the ugly. The women’s suffrage movement was seemingly endless, extremely challenging, and often full of disagreements and infighting. Wagner helped me to appreciate the struggle even more, but she also shines a light on inequalities even within the movement itself. Be prepared to read some awful, racist words from women you may consider to be your heroes. The amount of work and dedication women had to the suffrage cause is awe-inspiring. They worked relentlessly, many of them for their entire lives, often with little or no reward. People mocked and shunned them, but still they fought. Wagner reminds us that women were not “given” the right to vote, they fought tooth and nail for about 70 years for every tiny little victory that led to the 19th amendment. And for many women (especially in the South where Jim Crow laws prevented black men and women from voting), that fight continued until 1965 when the Voting Rights Act helped to curb voter suppression (unfortunately the VRA was gutted in 2013, so we are beginning to see another rise in voter suppression tactics). Wagner’s afterword is beautifully written and gives me inspiration for the fights that continue today: “History is shaped by those who swim with the tide as well as those who swim against it, stemming the tide of injustice. To choose not to act is the worst possible action. There are no innocent bystanders to history. Inaction ensures that injustice will continue in your name.”

  17. 4 out of 5

    Katie

    I'm really glad this is a book. Each chapter covered a decade leading up to the amendment that awarded women the vote, with publications and writings on women's suffrage from that decade. I feel so ignorant in saying this, but I didn't realize how long this battle for the vote was, and how very modern some of the rhetoric was. It was very eye opening to me. One of the shortcomings of the book for me was that each chapter started with a summary of the decade and then all the primary sources follo I'm really glad this is a book. Each chapter covered a decade leading up to the amendment that awarded women the vote, with publications and writings on women's suffrage from that decade. I feel so ignorant in saying this, but I didn't realize how long this battle for the vote was, and how very modern some of the rhetoric was. It was very eye opening to me. One of the shortcomings of the book for me was that each chapter started with a summary of the decade and then all the primary sources followed. I would've very much preferred to have the period texts integrated into the historical context. Listening to the audiobook made it hard to link the summary and historical context with the original source material because of the distance between them. But a pro of the audiobook was definitely that Bahni Turpin was the narrator; love her. She's one of my favorites. I really enjoyed the afterward, where Wagner called the suffragists out for not doing more, not using their right to vote to achieve more for women's and minority rights. I also appreciated that this book showed many angles to the surface movement, that the women didn't all agree. As I'm dedicating this month to reading feminist literature, I keep encountering that sentiment, that there's no way for half of the world's population to unite together, even when we face the same issues. This book showed that this has long been an issue in fighting for women's rights.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Falinda

    I liked the way this book is organized with the author’s explanation of each decade of the suffrage movement, followed by the primary documents supporting each of her summaries. I learned some very disturbing things about the women of the suffrage movement—their conservatism, racism, sexism, and anti-immigration. All the things that kept the vote away from them, they used against other women to keep them out of the suffrage movement. They focused on only certain women—white, tax-paying, and educ I liked the way this book is organized with the author’s explanation of each decade of the suffrage movement, followed by the primary documents supporting each of her summaries. I learned some very disturbing things about the women of the suffrage movement—their conservatism, racism, sexism, and anti-immigration. All the things that kept the vote away from them, they used against other women to keep them out of the suffrage movement. They focused on only certain women—white, tax-paying, and educated. Thus, the movement was so splintered, it is a miracle women achieved the vote in only 70 years. In the end women achieved the right to vote and the 19th amendment of the US constitution by voting. They had won the right to vote in enough states that when the 19th amendment was being ratified, TN was the last state needed for ratification. Women had elected just enough congressmen in the state to win the final vote for ratification. They won by only a few votes, but that’s all it took to change the lives of millions of women for the first time since the founding of our country. I highly recommend this book for anyone interested in the suffrage and women’s rights movements.

  19. 4 out of 5

    M

    An excellent book. It is balanced perfectly between primary writings from suffragists and original writing from the author. Wagner both celebrates and criticizes the ways in which suffragists helped and hindered the cause for universal equality and suffrage in America. The historical figures who dominate highlight their successes and their failures. Wagner gives a voice to minority suffragists and reminds the reader of the blood, sweat, tears, and lives lost to this noble cause as its centennial An excellent book. It is balanced perfectly between primary writings from suffragists and original writing from the author. Wagner both celebrates and criticizes the ways in which suffragists helped and hindered the cause for universal equality and suffrage in America. The historical figures who dominate highlight their successes and their failures. Wagner gives a voice to minority suffragists and reminds the reader of the blood, sweat, tears, and lives lost to this noble cause as its centennial approaches.

  20. 5 out of 5

    LP Hansen

    This undoubtedly comprehensive book lacks a vital sub-title: The Women's Suffrage Movement IN THE US. Perhaps the publisher is responsible for the current misleading title which leads a reader to assume there will be some acknowledgement of suffrage elsewhere, including New Zealand women being the first in the world to gain nationwide suffrage in 1893, almost 30 years before the US. However no apparent mention is made of this apart from a comment that "suffragists knew that women had voted in th This undoubtedly comprehensive book lacks a vital sub-title: The Women's Suffrage Movement IN THE US. Perhaps the publisher is responsible for the current misleading title which leads a reader to assume there will be some acknowledgement of suffrage elsewhere, including New Zealand women being the first in the world to gain nationwide suffrage in 1893, almost 30 years before the US. However no apparent mention is made of this apart from a comment that "suffragists knew that women had voted in the colonies." xxv

  21. 4 out of 5

    April Young

    This book is invaluable for its inclusion of the full-text of many first-person speeches and accounts of suffragists. Unlike many historians, the author does not take a neutral stance, and takes sides about which activists did activism right and which ones did it wrong. The opinionated commentary makes the narrative more interesting, but I often disagreed with the author's opinions and wished she were more open to seeing the value in other kinds of feminism besides her preferred brand.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Laura Nasoulinh

    I honestly tried so hard to finish this book before I had to return it to the library. I did get through most of it and really enjoyed learning more about it then what I did before. I may give it another try eventually and I do love learning new things. Overall I found it fascinating and liberating.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    As seen in the New Yorker: https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/20... As seen in the New Yorker: https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/20...

  24. 4 out of 5

    Booreiss

    This is a great compilation and summary of the suffragette movement by decade. Each chapter summarizes a decade on 10-20 pages and also provides excerpts of speeches and letters from that time.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jen O'Donnell

    "Can we do better than our foremothers and forefathers? The opportunity to do so is the gift we are given – and the responsibility."

  26. 4 out of 5

    old acc

    I'm giving this book 4 stars for being good at what it is—a book to reference on the Woman's Rights Movement with a wealth of great firsthand accounts. Most of those accounts, however, were boring to me. It started off smooth with Stanton's writing on the mother-age, which I loved, but my mistake was trying to read 583 pages of a political movement like a novel. It's not kind of book. Still, I learned a lot from it. I especially value learning about the radical Victoria Woodhull, the woman who s I'm giving this book 4 stars for being good at what it is—a book to reference on the Woman's Rights Movement with a wealth of great firsthand accounts. Most of those accounts, however, were boring to me. It started off smooth with Stanton's writing on the mother-age, which I loved, but my mistake was trying to read 583 pages of a political movement like a novel. It's not kind of book. Still, I learned a lot from it. I especially value learning about the radical Victoria Woodhull, the woman who stood against a rich and entitled rapist a hundred years before #MeToo, and Belva Blackwood, the the first woman to campaign and get votes to become the US President (Woodhull tried earlier, but didn't campaign) after successfully lobbying for many women's rights laws.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Elise Brianna

    Very informative, and very dry. Either I'm not cut out for learning about history (which is entirely possible) or this book could use some better storytelling techniques.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Debra Nagel

  29. 4 out of 5

    Megan Verhagen

  30. 5 out of 5

    Marissa

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