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Supreme Whispers: Conversations with Judges of the Supreme Court of India 1980-89

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Based on 114 intriguing interviews with nineteen former chief justices of India and more than sixty-six former judges of the Supreme Court of India, Abhinav Chandrachud opens a window to the life and times of the former judges of India's highest court of law and in the process offers a history that largely remained in oblivion for a long time.


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Based on 114 intriguing interviews with nineteen former chief justices of India and more than sixty-six former judges of the Supreme Court of India, Abhinav Chandrachud opens a window to the life and times of the former judges of India's highest court of law and in the process offers a history that largely remained in oblivion for a long time.

30 review for Supreme Whispers: Conversations with Judges of the Supreme Court of India 1980-89

  1. 5 out of 5

    Priyank Chauhan

    This is is the kind of book that is really hard to review. This is because the book is a result of efforts of two different people at two different points in time. George H. Gadbois Jr., a scholar of Indian law and judicial behaviour, conducted over 116 interviews with more than sixty-six judges of the Supreme Court of India, and others like senior lawyers, politicians, relatives of deceased judges and court staff. Gadbois made meticulous records of these interviews in his handwritten notes whic This is is the kind of book that is really hard to review. This is because the book is a result of efforts of two different people at two different points in time. George H. Gadbois Jr., a scholar of Indian law and judicial behaviour, conducted over 116 interviews with more than sixty-six judges of the Supreme Court of India, and others like senior lawyers, politicians, relatives of deceased judges and court staff. Gadbois made meticulous records of these interviews in his handwritten notes which he later typed out on a typewriter. Before passing away, he sent these notes to Abhinav Chandrachud, his student and the book’s author, after he had himself extracted a book out of them. The present book is justified by the author citing the fact that he had been granted full freedom towards the use of Gadbois’ notes by the man himself, and that Gadbois’ book barely scratched the surface on a few important details, perhaps due to the time period that it had been written in. It is with these things in mind that Abhinav Chandrachud fashions a rather interesting book out of Gadbois’ notes but since we are not exposed to the full catalogue of the original content we have to depend on the author’s discretion and direction in choosing and arranging the material. Full review here: http://www.indictoday.com/reviews/boo...

  2. 4 out of 5

    Pratyush Rathore

    This one is difficult to review. I really loved the read, simply because my knowledge of judiciary was negligible - the novelty factor for the book was 100% and I really felt my lack of knowledge about the judicial workings of the country while reading the book. However, this could have been far far better, both in terms of writing and structure. The lack of work from the writer in that regard was obviously apparent and irritating. It may be because I was not the target audience and it was writte This one is difficult to review. I really loved the read, simply because my knowledge of judiciary was negligible - the novelty factor for the book was 100% and I really felt my lack of knowledge about the judicial workings of the country while reading the book. However, this could have been far far better, both in terms of writing and structure. The lack of work from the writer in that regard was obviously apparent and irritating. It may be because I was not the target audience and it was written for somebody with some knowledge of judiciary. All in all, I am glad I have read it.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Phillip Adnett

    Quite an interesting book about an otherwise less covered Supreme court. As a British law student, it was interesting to see how Indian legal philosophies developed post-independence and how the Indian Supreme court forged their own identity, separate from the US or UK Common Law traditions. It was lacking on substantive law however, many important cases are quickly summed up, in favour of political and historical analysis. Overall, a strong book and an important read for many law students

  4. 5 out of 5

    Aman Garg

    Very few people have had the privilege of looking into the Inside world of the Hon'ble Supreme Court of India. The Indian Supreme Court is a mysterious edifice with a profusion of secrets and this book endeavors to explore the same. It attempts to reveal the events of what happens behind the walls of this court and provides the readers with a new perception of the Indian judges. Some good, some better and some worse. An amazing read.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Sejal

    This makes for a very easy and extremely interesting read on the judges of the Supreme Court of India. Mostly we consider them as the institution that they represent rather than themselves. The book provides insight into the humane perspective of the court.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Aditya Bharadwaj

    The way the book has used Prof. Gadbois notes to explain the inner politics of the Supreme court from independence till the 80's is amazing. The arrangement of the sections along with scrutiny of different topics was really good. A must read for anyone interested in Indian legal history.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Adithya

    Intresting book, this book drastically changed my perspective towards Indian judiciary especially the apex court, there are too many flaws in the appointment of judges and in the elevation of judges to the apex court from the bar and high courts. One really wonders if the judiciary can function independently while reading this book.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Sunjoy Shekhar

    Fails to deliver on its promise. A mere catalogue of “he said, she said” woven in an uninspiring narrative and an insipid prose. The best part of the book is the first two pages of the introduction.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Sambasivan

    Ok read. Collection of themes from various interviews. It appears to me that the government has always been interfering with the judiciary.

  10. 5 out of 5

    akhilesh

    This is a very informative book and shows you the evolution of the Supreme Court from the colonial era to the 21st century. I would honestly rate this book 4/5, but given that this is the only existing work in this domain, I have chosen to give it a 5/5.

  11. 4 out of 5

    tanishq

  12. 5 out of 5

    Gaurav Pathak

  13. 5 out of 5

    Sachin Bhagwat

  14. 4 out of 5

    Nishchay Sharma

  15. 5 out of 5

    Afreen Alam

  16. 5 out of 5

    Sanjiv

  17. 4 out of 5

    Varunkumar

  18. 5 out of 5

    Anirudh Goyal

  19. 4 out of 5

    Eukti Garg

  20. 4 out of 5

    Stephin

  21. 5 out of 5

    Kumar Diwesh

  22. 4 out of 5

    Eddie

  23. 4 out of 5

    Shreya Singh

  24. 4 out of 5

    Ashmi Mohan

  25. 5 out of 5

    Zeeshan Thomas

  26. 4 out of 5

    Shubhang Upadhyay

  27. 5 out of 5

    Adwait Bhonde

  28. 4 out of 5

    Satyajeev Patnaik

  29. 5 out of 5

    Divesh Rathod

  30. 5 out of 5

    Saurabh

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