counter create hit The Domestication of Transcendence: How Modern Thinking about God Went Wrong - Download Free eBook
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

The Domestication of Transcendence: How Modern Thinking about God Went Wrong

Availability: Ready to download

William Placher looks at "classical" Christian theology (Thomas Aquinas, John Calvin, Martin Luther) and contrasts it with the Christian discourse about God that evolved in the seventeenth century. In particular, he deals with the notion of transcendence that gained prominence in this era and its impact on modern theology and modern thinking today. He persuasively argues t William Placher looks at "classical" Christian theology (Thomas Aquinas, John Calvin, Martin Luther) and contrasts it with the Christian discourse about God that evolved in the seventeenth century. In particular, he deals with the notion of transcendence that gained prominence in this era and its impact on modern theology and modern thinking today. He persuasively argues that useful lessons can be drawn from premodern thinking about God, especially when viewed within the context of contemporary objections to it. This reexamination, according to Placher, has practical and profound implications for modern theology.


Compare
Ads Banner

William Placher looks at "classical" Christian theology (Thomas Aquinas, John Calvin, Martin Luther) and contrasts it with the Christian discourse about God that evolved in the seventeenth century. In particular, he deals with the notion of transcendence that gained prominence in this era and its impact on modern theology and modern thinking today. He persuasively argues t William Placher looks at "classical" Christian theology (Thomas Aquinas, John Calvin, Martin Luther) and contrasts it with the Christian discourse about God that evolved in the seventeenth century. In particular, he deals with the notion of transcendence that gained prominence in this era and its impact on modern theology and modern thinking today. He persuasively argues that useful lessons can be drawn from premodern thinking about God, especially when viewed within the context of contemporary objections to it. This reexamination, according to Placher, has practical and profound implications for modern theology.

30 review for The Domestication of Transcendence: How Modern Thinking about God Went Wrong

  1. 5 out of 5

    Patrick Schlabs

    This book addresses the major shift in thinking about God and thus, language about God in the years after the enlightenment. Placher points to the wisdom of Aquinas, Luther, and Calvin and explored what their thought and language of God can restore to us in the 21st century. The final chapter on the inadequacy of theodicies is worth the price of the book.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Alex Stroshine

    This is a challenging but rewarding read about how the classical theology of the medieval period and the Reformation dramatically changed as time went by. Although Aquinas, Luther and Calvin affirmed the mystery of God, subsequent theologians and philosophers (e.g. Jansenists, Arminians, Puritans, Enlightenment thinkers) sought to comprehend and understand God (e.g. developing schemes for understanding free will and God's sovereignty) leading to a contorted theology. One of the most interesting This is a challenging but rewarding read about how the classical theology of the medieval period and the Reformation dramatically changed as time went by. Although Aquinas, Luther and Calvin affirmed the mystery of God, subsequent theologians and philosophers (e.g. Jansenists, Arminians, Puritans, Enlightenment thinkers) sought to comprehend and understand God (e.g. developing schemes for understanding free will and God's sovereignty) leading to a contorted theology. One of the most interesting aspects of this is the increase in self-scrutiny and examination, particularly among the Puritans. Where Calvin urged believers to trust in Christ, the Puritans became far more introspective; now one had to examine oneself to ensure they were living faithfully to God rather than relying on the grace and mercy of Jesus. Placher closes by offering thoughts on evil and God's transcendence. This is well worth another read. The book is mostly a chronology of ideas; the material causes of changes to theology are not so much addressed.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    "To say this—or to make any other criticism of some turn modernity took—is not to propose a simple return to the premodern. We could not go back into that world if we wanted to, and we would not want to if we could. It was a world of terrible injustice and violence, and some aspects of its theology both reflected and even contributed to those horrors. Christian theologians supported oppressive social structures and all sorts of bigotry; the male bias of the tradition is only one of its most obvi "To say this—or to make any other criticism of some turn modernity took—is not to propose a simple return to the premodern. We could not go back into that world if we wanted to, and we would not want to if we could. It was a world of terrible injustice and violence, and some aspects of its theology both reflected and even contributed to those horrors. Christian theologians supported oppressive social structures and all sorts of bigotry; the male bias of the tradition is only one of its most obvious faults. If contemporary theology engages in critical retrievals of insights from premodern theology, then the retrievals must indeed always be critical, keeping in mind that what we retrieve was often embedded in contexts we can no longer accept. To engage in such critical retrievals while acknowledging our debts to modernity is to synthesize something new."

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jon DePue

    This isn't just another book about the question of modernity. Rather, in this ambitious work, Placher makes a case for how human beings should think and talk about God, showing how the dawn of the modern age in the seventeenth century brought with it the loss of an appreciation for divine transcendence. Instead of suggesting a wholesale retrieval of premodern theology, or the adoption of a postmodern theology, Placher offers his readers a detailed treatment of Aquinas, Luther, and Calvin. These This isn't just another book about the question of modernity. Rather, in this ambitious work, Placher makes a case for how human beings should think and talk about God, showing how the dawn of the modern age in the seventeenth century brought with it the loss of an appreciation for divine transcendence. Instead of suggesting a wholesale retrieval of premodern theology, or the adoption of a postmodern theology, Placher offers his readers a detailed treatment of Aquinas, Luther, and Calvin. These pre-Enlightenment theological giants knew something that their modern (and I would also add postmodern) successors seemed to forget: Theology must begin by trusting the self-revealing God who, dialectically, remains beyond human comprehension, and forego any hopes of explaining its assertions to the satisfaction of non-Christians. Such efforts inevitably confuse God with more familiar realities, allowing systems of human thought to control divine revelation. (One is reminded at the point of Barth's critique of Christian apologetics in CD I/2.) However, I wonder if the fundamental problem is not simply the domestication of God's transcendence, but also the domestication of the explosively universal character of Christian truth-claims revealed in Jesus. Jesus himself is disclosed as the Lord of truth, space and time, history, and Judaism, which necessarily means that God's self-revelation will have universal significance. This might be a bit picky, but I couldn't really think of anything else. The book is just really damn persuasive.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Ben Crosby

    A very rewarding read, focusing primarily on the way in which God becomes in the modern period understood as a being among beings in the world rather than as the Being about which we can only speak analogically - and its consequences for how we understand grace, the limits of theological language, evil, and more. One might note that the account he gives of the classical, pre-modern Christian tradition is a decidedly postliberal one, but this is a feature, not a bug (though I'm not sure he gets T A very rewarding read, focusing primarily on the way in which God becomes in the modern period understood as a being among beings in the world rather than as the Being about which we can only speak analogically - and its consequences for how we understand grace, the limits of theological language, evil, and more. One might note that the account he gives of the classical, pre-modern Christian tradition is a decidedly postliberal one, but this is a feature, not a bug (though I'm not sure he gets Thomas' five ways quite right, even if he gets closer than many, if not most). Certainly his diagnosis of one of the key problems with modern theologizing strikes me as right-on, and the project of a critical retrieval of pre-modern accounts of the limits of our language about God is one that I entirely endorse.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Drew

    Placher is never an easy read but is always rewarding. His Calvinist leanings come through more strongly here than in the other books I've read from his corpus, but the final chapter on theodicy is alone worth the price of admission.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Brian

  8. 5 out of 5

    Chris Roberts

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan Petzold

  10. 4 out of 5

    Heidi

  11. 4 out of 5

    Wesley Hill

  12. 4 out of 5

    Ty Benbow

  13. 4 out of 5

    Joe

  14. 5 out of 5

    Carolyn Francis

  15. 4 out of 5

    Ian Packer

  16. 5 out of 5

    Clayton Hutchins

  17. 5 out of 5

    Zachary Wilke

  18. 5 out of 5

    Paul Bjerke

  19. 5 out of 5

    Steve McCready

  20. 5 out of 5

    Marcia

  21. 4 out of 5

    Dillon Evans

  22. 4 out of 5

    FatherSwithin

  23. 5 out of 5

    Kester

  24. 4 out of 5

    Elliot Lee

  25. 5 out of 5

    Paul

  26. 4 out of 5

    Mark

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan Platter

  28. 4 out of 5

    Bob Wollenberg

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jenine

  30. 5 out of 5

    Tommy Graves

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.