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Praised by media and political figures including Michael Bloomberg, Hillary Clinton, and Katie Couric, Shannon Watts—"the NRA’s Worst Nightmare”—tells the inspiring story of how a rallying call-to-action grew into a powerful movement to protect children from America’s epidemic of gun violence, and offers lessons for others who want to make a difference in their community. O Praised by media and political figures including Michael Bloomberg, Hillary Clinton, and Katie Couric, Shannon Watts—"the NRA’s Worst Nightmare”—tells the inspiring story of how a rallying call-to-action grew into a powerful movement to protect children from America’s epidemic of gun violence, and offers lessons for others who want to make a difference in their community. On the morning of December 14, 2012, stay-at-home-mom Shannon Watts was folding laundry when the news broke that there had been a shooting in Newtown, Connecticut. Along with the world, Watts watched horrifying images of children being marched in a line outside of Sandy Hook Elementary School. Outraged and heartbroken, Shannon felt an overwhelming need to act. She thought there must be an organization like Mothers Against Drunk Driving, but for gun violence prevention. There was no such organization. Watts decided then and there that she needed to build it. Fight like a Mother is the powerful story of how one mother’s cry for change started a national women’s movement—Moms Demand Action—to fight some of the richest and most powerful people in America: the gun lobby. It is a riveting account of how outraged mothers became engaged activists, creating a powerful grassroots network of local chapters in all 50 states. Along with her observations and wisdom, Watts shares inspiring messages of perseverance, courage, and compassion, and outlines the core mantras and principles that Moms Demand Action has used to battle the NRA and the intimidating tactics they use to prevent gun safety progress. Most of all, Fight like a Mother explores the unique power of women—starting with what they have, owning their expertise, asking for help, and doubling down instead of backing down. While not everyone can be on the front lines lobbying congress, every mom is already an organizer, and Shannon shows them how to put their skills to use in their own community, in their own way. Bringing activism into the everyday, Fight like a Mother will inspire everyone—mothers and fathers, students and teachers, lawmakers, and anyone who is outraged, angry, and motivated to work for change— to get to work transforming hearts, minds, and laws.


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Praised by media and political figures including Michael Bloomberg, Hillary Clinton, and Katie Couric, Shannon Watts—"the NRA’s Worst Nightmare”—tells the inspiring story of how a rallying call-to-action grew into a powerful movement to protect children from America’s epidemic of gun violence, and offers lessons for others who want to make a difference in their community. O Praised by media and political figures including Michael Bloomberg, Hillary Clinton, and Katie Couric, Shannon Watts—"the NRA’s Worst Nightmare”—tells the inspiring story of how a rallying call-to-action grew into a powerful movement to protect children from America’s epidemic of gun violence, and offers lessons for others who want to make a difference in their community. On the morning of December 14, 2012, stay-at-home-mom Shannon Watts was folding laundry when the news broke that there had been a shooting in Newtown, Connecticut. Along with the world, Watts watched horrifying images of children being marched in a line outside of Sandy Hook Elementary School. Outraged and heartbroken, Shannon felt an overwhelming need to act. She thought there must be an organization like Mothers Against Drunk Driving, but for gun violence prevention. There was no such organization. Watts decided then and there that she needed to build it. Fight like a Mother is the powerful story of how one mother’s cry for change started a national women’s movement—Moms Demand Action—to fight some of the richest and most powerful people in America: the gun lobby. It is a riveting account of how outraged mothers became engaged activists, creating a powerful grassroots network of local chapters in all 50 states. Along with her observations and wisdom, Watts shares inspiring messages of perseverance, courage, and compassion, and outlines the core mantras and principles that Moms Demand Action has used to battle the NRA and the intimidating tactics they use to prevent gun safety progress. Most of all, Fight like a Mother explores the unique power of women—starting with what they have, owning their expertise, asking for help, and doubling down instead of backing down. While not everyone can be on the front lines lobbying congress, every mom is already an organizer, and Shannon shows them how to put their skills to use in their own community, in their own way. Bringing activism into the everyday, Fight like a Mother will inspire everyone—mothers and fathers, students and teachers, lawmakers, and anyone who is outraged, angry, and motivated to work for change— to get to work transforming hearts, minds, and laws.

30 review for Fight like a Mother: How a Grassroots Movement Took on the Gun Lobby and Why Women Will Change the World

  1. 5 out of 5

    britt_brooke

    From its spur of the moment inception following the devastation at Sandy Hook to its rapid growth, branding, successes, and challenges, this is the in-depth story behind Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America. Thank you, Shannon Watts, and all members/volunteers, for your tireless work and dedication. I’m proud to be a member of my local chapter.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Betsy Lasch

    I was fortunate to receive an advanced copy of the book. A group of 17 women read and discussed the book. We were affirmed, energized, excited by Shannon's words. There is no book more appropriate or meaningful for a group of women activists. Our highlighters ran dry as we reacted to her comments. Her book is an affirmation of our beliefs, a Balm of Gilead to the struggles and emotions that we experience daily, and a battle plan that speaks to our mission. Shannon wanted to “bring together a bad I was fortunate to receive an advanced copy of the book. A group of 17 women read and discussed the book. We were affirmed, energized, excited by Shannon's words. There is no book more appropriate or meaningful for a group of women activists. Our highlighters ran dry as we reacted to her comments. Her book is an affirmation of our beliefs, a Balm of Gilead to the struggles and emotions that we experience daily, and a battle plan that speaks to our mission. Shannon wanted to “bring together a badass group of women . . . .and raise an army of tough mothers.” Her goals have been exceeded.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Paulette Cervenka

    Loved this book. If you’re a mom, or a grandma like me, who feels that you don’t have enough power over what happens in our country, read this book. Shannon Watts does a great job of showing that moms are a FORCE. We need to find our voice, be brave, organize, and know that we hold a vast amount of power if we will just use it.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Ann

    Our book club was able to read the unedited version! It was fantastic. Shannon speaks plainly and the book is easy to read. She offers loads of advice for organizing a grassroots movement as well as fully explaining the position of Moms Demand Action.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Kate Hanley

    I can't rate this book because I collaborated on the writing of it -- a huge honor and career highlight! I am so inspired by Shannon Watts and everyone who is part of the organization she started, Moms Demand Action. This has been a life-changing project from me; it has already gotten me to testify at the state house in defense of a bill I care deeply about (at 1:45 am, no less). I had to read it over as part of the editorial process, so I figured, it totally counts toward my goal of reading 52 I can't rate this book because I collaborated on the writing of it -- a huge honor and career highlight! I am so inspired by Shannon Watts and everyone who is part of the organization she started, Moms Demand Action. This has been a life-changing project from me; it has already gotten me to testify at the state house in defense of a bill I care deeply about (at 1:45 am, no less). I had to read it over as part of the editorial process, so I figured, it totally counts toward my goal of reading 52 books this year. :)

  6. 4 out of 5

    Tucker (TuckerTheReader)

    Many thanks to HarperOne for sending me a copy in exchange for an honest review | Goodreads | Blog | Pinterest | LinkedIn | YouTube | Instagram Many thanks to HarperOne for sending me a copy in exchange for an honest review | Goodreads | Blog | Pinterest | LinkedIn | YouTube | Instagram

  7. 4 out of 5

    Brandi

    I admire her tenacity, but sadly, I just didn't 'feel' this book like I thought I would. There is a lot of useful info in here, I guess I was just expecting something else. I would rate it about 4.3. My copy of this book was from a Goodreads giveaway.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Brigitte Dale

    Fight Like a Mother by Shannon Watts is essentially a guidebook for prospective volunteers in the organization she founded, Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America. Watts explains how she came to establish the organization following the Sandy Hook school shooting tragedy in 2012 (via a Facebook group) and how advocacy on local, state, and national levels has led to the organization’s hard-fought victories against the NRA. Using her experience as a mother of five children, Watts grounds her a Fight Like a Mother by Shannon Watts is essentially a guidebook for prospective volunteers in the organization she founded, Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America. Watts explains how she came to establish the organization following the Sandy Hook school shooting tragedy in 2012 (via a Facebook group) and how advocacy on local, state, and national levels has led to the organization’s hard-fought victories against the NRA. Using her experience as a mother of five children, Watts grounds her assertions in the universally vital power of moms. I expected a story with more aspects of memoir than this book actually has. I went in hoping for childhood memories and moments of reflection, but instead, I encountered a book written as though in the trenches. Watts is, indeed, in the midst of a mortal fight for sensible gun laws. I sensed the same urgency as the primary texts I’ve read of women leaders in other political movements, like the suffragettes of the early 1900s, in that she lists many dates and goals and events, without providing the big-picture analysis you’d expect from someone more removed from a movement. While the lists and short sections may make the book accessible to an audience unfamiliar with reading about political movements, it felt like a slog to me, and a disservice to Watts’ broad aspirations that she seemed to simplify. It became evident early on, and more so as the book progressed, that Watts’ expected her audience to be predominantly moms who were not yet involved with Moms Demand Action. She refers to her reader using “you” and “we” and repeatedly cites women’s ‘mama bear’ powers as emblems of organizing strength. Perhaps Watts knows her audience better than I do, but I felt that the bulleted lists and section breaks every few paragraphs didn’t give her audience enough credit. Structurally, the book bounced around chronologically and repetitively in terms of the group’s goals, failures, and achievements. Watts did do a strong job of encouraging women to volunteer, and emphasized not only the changes to gun policy that desperately need to occur, but also the sense of community and purpose that Moms Demand Action volunteers gain. It felt like an effective recruiting tactic for apprehensive first-timers. And I do not want to discredit Watts’ amazing accomplishments—Moms Demand Action volunteers instruct Americans on safe gun practices every fifteen minutes. Still, for a book that was co-written (or ghost written), it lacks a strong organizational structure to carry a reader like myself—not a mom but someone interested in gun control and women in politics—through all 250 pages. Overall, Fight Like a Mother is an important artifact in the fight for gun control, and a great example of a women-led nonpartisan organization. Watts offers excellent strategies on keeping one’s family safe in domestic settings where guns might be present. I also enjoyed hearing how she discussed gun violence with her own children. I gather that many moms will, indeed, find this to be an inspiring and accessible text, as it should be. I only wish Watts’ had access to sharper editing, both to make the story more reflective and to widen the book’s audience.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Kate

    I love Shannon Watts. Seriously, I adore her. I just expected to feel more pumped reading this? Maybe my expectations were too high.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Holly

    5 stars for the Moms Demand Movement, 2 stars for this book. Disclaimer: I'm a MDA volunteer lead for my local chapter. However to be perfectly honest, this book kind of bored me. Maybe it was the chapters that kept specifically referencing other chapters (both still coming up and already read up to that point). Maybe it was how off-topic it seemed to get at times (a whole section on branding - really? what does that have to do with anything described in the book title?). Maybe it was the lack of 5 stars for the Moms Demand Movement, 2 stars for this book. Disclaimer: I'm a MDA volunteer lead for my local chapter. However to be perfectly honest, this book kind of bored me. Maybe it was the chapters that kept specifically referencing other chapters (both still coming up and already read up to that point). Maybe it was how off-topic it seemed to get at times (a whole section on branding - really? what does that have to do with anything described in the book title?). Maybe it was the lack of any memoir-esque insight into Shannon Watts herself or any real interesting deep insight into how the movement went from a Facebook page to it's current connection with Everytown. Maybe it was the lack of detail about the subject matter itself that inspired this movement (the Gun Lobby mentioned in the title) or a deeper look into gun violence beyond some mere listing of stats. Maybe it was the vast over simplification of how a woman's role of mom translates into running for office (apparently the financial aspects of running a campaign is comparable to having a household budget - I am not even making that example up). Maybe it's the fact that this book was obviously written by someone who is not a writer by profession (no offense to Shannon Watts). I was incredibly frustrated by this book, because I felt like I couldn't recommend it to my fellow MDA volunteers (it doesn't seem really directed at us as an audience and we know most of the information given in this book) and I couldn't recommend it to non-MDA volunteers in the hopes of inspiring them to get involved in MDA (it doesn't really delve much into gun violence itself). So I'm left wondering - who is this book for?

  11. 4 out of 5

    Ericka Clouther

    More than a book about gun policy! It's a book about activism, feminism, intersectionality, and generally making the world a better place. Strongly recommend this book!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Karen

    Shannon Watts shares the story of Moms Demand Action in a way that is helpful for anyone who wants to help change the world but is not sure where to start. She particularly praises the power of women to get things done and inspires us all to get out there and try. A must-read!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Christine

    This book was a masterclass in how to #KeepGoing. This book offers the wisdom and insight on how to build your own advocacy work, in the face of opposition, doubt and exhaustion. A fantastic read for long-time volunteers or people just starting out in this work.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Kathy

    This was probably the most interesting nonfiction book I've read in a while. I know Shannon had a writer who helped her and they made a dynamic pair. Compelling narrative plus a sparkling style made for a great book. The first half dazzled me more than the second as I am not personally planning to start my own chapter. I was motivated to buy myself shirts and I plan on helping our local chapter more. Great cause, wonderful woman and inspired writing.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

    It takes a lot for me to read non fiction.............this book did not disappoint. Part activist manual, part feminist tome, part empowerment tool and a whole hell of a lot of common senses info. I was was inspired & encourage. #keepgoing It takes a lot for me to read non fiction.............this book did not disappoint. Part activist manual, part feminist tome, part empowerment tool and a whole hell of a lot of common senses info. I was was inspired & encourage. #keepgoing

  16. 4 out of 5

    Heather Levinson

    Very powerful and packed with so much good information!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Leslie Morrison

    This is a wonderfully encouraging, data-driven book for anyone interested or involved in Moms Demand Action.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Robin_R

    Such an interesting story of how this movement started and what it is doing to help prevent gun violence. I learned so much and felt both hopeful and empowered to help make common sense changes in my community.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Sue Bottino

    Not as good as I wanted it to be. Way too much "how to" and not enough "why to."

  20. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    Fight Like A Mother: How a Grassroots Movement Took on the Gun Lobby and Why Women Will Change the World was written by Shannon Watts, the founder of Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America, who created the group as a Facebook page in her kitchen after the events of Sandy Hook. The group now has over five million supporters working to end gun violence and Watts has testified on gun violence before lawmakers. Watts has delivered an engaging and insightful book on the battle to end gun violence Fight Like A Mother: How a Grassroots Movement Took on the Gun Lobby and Why Women Will Change the World was written by Shannon Watts, the founder of Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America, who created the group as a Facebook page in her kitchen after the events of Sandy Hook. The group now has over five million supporters working to end gun violence and Watts has testified on gun violence before lawmakers. Watts has delivered an engaging and insightful book on the battle to end gun violence. It is both a rallying cry and a how-to for anyone who wants to change the gun laws in the United States – especially moms.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    Great book about a badass mom and an unstoppable group!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Melissa Laidman

    This is a must read for anyone, especially moms, who want to do something about gun violence. I feel more well informed and inspired to effect change. I enjoyed the useful statistics as well as the achievements that Moms Demand Action have reached. Highly recommend.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Tj

    It takes time and reading it in small doses to be able to process all of the alarming data and research. It is part rally cry and part information front-loading to ready oneself to get out there and fight for making things right. I read a chapter every few days so technically still not cover-to-cover done, but almost!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Joelle Egan

    Part personal account, part “How To” manual and part PR recruitment tool for her organization, Shannon Watts’ Fight Like a Mother is a call to action aimed specifically at mothers who are concerned about the current state of gun control in the U.S. Spurred to action after the horrific events at Sandy Hook, Watts founded Moms Demand Action, a national movement that grew out of her Facebook page. This book details the evolution of the grassroots group and recounts the successes and “losing forward Part personal account, part “How To” manual and part PR recruitment tool for her organization, Shannon Watts’ Fight Like a Mother is a call to action aimed specifically at mothers who are concerned about the current state of gun control in the U.S. Spurred to action after the horrific events at Sandy Hook, Watts founded Moms Demand Action, a national movement that grew out of her Facebook page. This book details the evolution of the grassroots group and recounts the successes and “losing forward” events that have resulted from its efforts. Watts emphasizes how the skill sets mothers often already possess can be utilized for activism and encourages those who may be reluctant to participate. She discusses how to recruit and motivate volunteers, build expertise through networks and data collection, use social media for low-cost message distribution, and combat challenges to delegation and life/work balance. Throughout, Watts uses her own experiences to highlight potential pitfalls and recommend methods for maintaining momentum. She provides advice for finding solutions to common internal and external roadblocks that can occur when addressing a complex and controversial issue. Like any book based on constantly-evolving current events, Fight Like a Mother will inevitably contain some expiring data in the time it takes to be published. Still, there is plenty of extremely useful and inspiring information that Watts provides for anyone who desires to contribute to the gun reform debate or even build a movement of their own. Thanks to Edelweiss and Harper Collins for an ARC of this book in exchange for an objective review.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    Part memoir, part self-help guide, part how-to manual. A perfect read for those interested in gun violence prevention advocacy.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Richard Propes

    There's no question that I deeply admire Shannon Watts" and that I am definitely the target audience for "Fight Like a Mother." No, I am not a mother. Or a father. I'm an activist. I'm someone who has tried to do something, not so much specific to gun violence but in the area of violence toward children. I'm in a wheelchair and I've spent 30 years of my life traveling around by wheelchair raising awareness and money for non-profits working to end violence in the lives of children. This year, actu There's no question that I deeply admire Shannon Watts" and that I am definitely the target audience for "Fight Like a Mother." No, I am not a mother. Or a father. I'm an activist. I'm someone who has tried to do something, not so much specific to gun violence but in the area of violence toward children. I'm in a wheelchair and I've spent 30 years of my life traveling around by wheelchair raising awareness and money for non-profits working to end violence in the lives of children. This year, actually in about 3-4 weeks, I'll do my last "tour." Truthfully, I read "Fight Like a Mother" both to support Watts and for my own inspiration as I move into this final event and into new ways to make a difference. I've been struggling with the transition and I really picked up this book because I wanted to click into a solid rhythm for this last event and into a solid vision for life past my own event, The Tenderness Tour. I struggled early on with the book, the first couple chapters essentially being a celebration of mothers and how they fight. I couldn't identify with it, to be honest. In my case, speaking my truth about my childhood violence ended my relationship with my mother. There was no "fight." There was disconnection. Choosing to be involved in this work? It has only made it worse. But then, something clicked for me with "Fight Like a Mother." First off, I like the way Watts balances first-person testimonial with an organized way of teaching non-profit, grassroots organizing management. While I've seen some negative comments around the material's nitty gritty, like social media and brand management, the truth is these are absolutely vital components of getting a message out there and I love that they are addressed here. Even in reading these chapters, I can see with more clarity why this thing I devoted 30 years of my life to never really grew beyond "grassroots." I see mistakes I've made. I also see successes and why people, even if it has been a small little village, have remained loyal to it all these years. I appreciate the call into one's own strengths. I appreciate the idea of doing "something" even before you're ready. I appreciate the chapter on myths. I appreciate the research. Watts writes from a very relaxed place - it's less inspirational "rah rah" and more feeling like you've got a soul sister on your side if you choose to do this work. Watts is less worried about falsely inspiring someone and more into the idea of motivating someone to do something. The truth is that even my own grassroots efforts have always been dominated by women - easily 90%. Part of this is the cause - children's issues. Part of this is my own disability - my experience has always been that women tend to be more comfy with disability. Part of this, to be honest, is also me - being a sexual abuse survivor, I've always been more comfy working with women. While Watts doesn't really specifically write to women, in a book called "Fight Like a Mother" you should probably expect that a good amount of the material is going to focus on women and their specific needs and strengths in activism along with cultural issues around it. Watts doesn't flinch in discussing the inherent sexism present in both business and political systems along with the obvious (and it is obvious) sexism of the NRA and similar groups. So, I'm not sure I consider "Fight Like a Mother" to be the perfect book, but I think it was the perfect book for me at the perfect time for me. I needed this book right now and Shannon Watts delivered exactly what I needed. So, yeah. 5 stars it is.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Donna Hines

    We are becoming acclimated to violence while lacking empathy and compassion needed to sustain life. It's amazing to me just how far we have yet to go but perhaps through this valiant effort we might just close the gap. It's all about putting yourself in the race. Staying actively involved. Knowing your constituents and policies. However, I would add it takes thick skin for women to put themselves out there and be subjected to death threats and vulgarities from trolls daily. I've seen what happens u We are becoming acclimated to violence while lacking empathy and compassion needed to sustain life. It's amazing to me just how far we have yet to go but perhaps through this valiant effort we might just close the gap. It's all about putting yourself in the race. Staying actively involved. Knowing your constituents and policies. However, I would add it takes thick skin for women to put themselves out there and be subjected to death threats and vulgarities from trolls daily. I've seen what happens up front and personal when you speak out against injustices. For men today they feel superior and I'd add they've become even more arrogant, obnoxious, and egotistical. In NEPA (Luzerne County) Pennsylvania we have more than our fair share of narcissists and I'd add these white egotistical males who feel they are above the law and above women in general. I'm so sick of dealing with these individuals who won't give you the right of way on the roadways, who run you off the roads, who must have control and power in their lives at all times so much so they will cut you off without an apology even at the supermarket aisles or walkways. I digress this book is more than just the white male it's about the movement of the gun lobbyist and NRA to keep guns in power by using fear. Fear that gun rights will be taken away from gun owners. This is furthest from the truth yet it's re-told ad nauseum and given credit by our media. In fact for me it centers more upon the media and their need to insight riots by not fact checking, by noting inaccurate information, by taking sides politically, and by using gaslighting techniques to question victims (add here victim blaming and shaming). What I've seen locally in my area is the sit down, shut up, and don't respond or else face threats, negative commentary, and ridicule. Online bullying is common place. I see it daily the go along to get along. The numbers in masses who feel they are superior even behind a computer screen. It's sickening the world we live in and I'm afraid of what's yet to come. How far back will we move the feminist movement? What will happen to women's rights moving forward? How can women succeed if they are constantly under fire and threatened with their lives without security being offered once they make it to Congress or beyond? What will the world be like with these racist, homophobe, bigots in office? While volunteering is nice it doesn't pay the bills I know after achieving the highest award for service from President George H.W. Bush known as the Points of Light. Women can't afford to raise their families when men casually walk away without feeling the need to be actively involved in their kids lives. So how can women be more and do more when many are struggling to bring food to the table and make a living considering the low wage earning potentials? I wish I had the answers as I've been struggling below poverty since 2010 myself while seeking a living wage to raise my family after we were tossed to the street without a home, income, assets, savings, or credit. What we need is more women in crucial points of entry all across the board including in family courts so that we can finally have relief! Shannon has touched on a nerve and I hope she keeps going but we have so much more to do!

  28. 5 out of 5

    Lynn

    Today's Non-Fiction post is on Fight Like a Mother: How a Grassroots Movement Took on the Gun Lobby and Why Women Will Change the World by Shannon Watts. It is 304 pages long and is published by Harper Collins. The cover is white with a picture of the group Moms Demand Action on it. The intended reader is someone who is interested in the group Moms Demand Action, interested in learning how to create a group movement, or someone who is interested in gun lobby and government. There is mild foul la Today's Non-Fiction post is on Fight Like a Mother: How a Grassroots Movement Took on the Gun Lobby and Why Women Will Change the World by Shannon Watts. It is 304 pages long and is published by Harper Collins. The cover is white with a picture of the group Moms Demand Action on it. The intended reader is someone who is interested in the group Moms Demand Action, interested in learning how to create a group movement, or someone who is interested in gun lobby and government. There is mild foul language, no sex, and discussion of violence. There Be Spoilers Ahead. From the back of the book- Protecting Kids from Unsafe Gun Laws Takes a Movement of Moms. Shannon Watts was a stay-at-home mom folding laundry when news broke of the tragic shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School. Outraged, Watts decided to do something about it. Fight like a Mother is the incredible account of how one mother's cry for change became the driving force behind gun safety progress. What started as a simple Facebook group to connect with other frustrated parents grew into Moms Demand Action, a national movement with millions of supporters and a powerful grassroots network of local chapters in all fifty states. Watts has been called 'the NRA worst nightmare'- and her army of moms has bravely gone up against the gun lobby, showing up in their signature re shirts, blocking the hallways of Congress with their strollers, electing gun sense candidates and running for office themselves, and proving that if the 80 million moms in this country come together, they can put an end to gun violence. Fight like a Mother will inspire everyone- mothers and fathers, students and teachers, an anyone motivated to enact change- to get to work transforming hearts and minds, and passing laws that save lives. Review- An interesting, moving, and informative nonfiction read about how a grassroots movement can be a true force to be reckoned with. Watts starts with herself at home the day of the Sandy Hook shooting and the horror that overcame her. From there we travel with her from her creating her Facebook page all the way to 2018 and all the ways that Moms Demand Action have moved across America. Watts gives good advice about starting a movement, about having goals, and having expectations. It is very written, not overly emotionally but it does not play down the seriousness of gun violence and the trauma of those who survive it. This is both a useful guide for movements and a a study in gun violence in America. I enjoyed reading this and I would recommend it. I give this book a Four out of Five stars. I get nothing for my review and I was given this book as a gift.

  29. 4 out of 5

    EAM

    If you're a parent who has ever wondered what you can do to help address the issue of gun violence in the U.S., then this is a book for you. It will energize you and have you start thinking differently about what each of us can do to make an impact on this issue, especially when most of us feel the problem is too big to tackle. This book is partially a memoir - Watts recalls the story of what finally motivated her to take action on an issue that can make many parents feel helpless and frightened If you're a parent who has ever wondered what you can do to help address the issue of gun violence in the U.S., then this is a book for you. It will energize you and have you start thinking differently about what each of us can do to make an impact on this issue, especially when most of us feel the problem is too big to tackle. This book is partially a memoir - Watts recalls the story of what finally motivated her to take action on an issue that can make many parents feel helpless and frightened about how we can protect our children. The books is also a call to the reader to engage in some of the small, everyday, actions that can make a difference in fighting back against the gun lobby. Watts recounts many of the ways that mothers/women have made huge differences in the past and why these are examples for how we can make a difference today. Still, in many ways Watt's advice is applicable to any person who wonders 'how can I really make a difference in this world?' - it doesn't have to just be about the gun lobby - which is why I found much of the book enlightening, to think about how these ideas can be applied in other circumstances. Although Watts acknowledges that not every person in America is has the resources or means to make actually act against some of this 'big problem issues' in our country, I felt disappointed that there was more attention in the book around this issue. It's very easy for privileged individuals, who have a supportive partner at home, to empower their loved one to go out and 'change the world'; but, the reality is, is that for millions of Americans who are touched by issues like gun violence, they are a lot less lucky. For this reason, I felt that a huge portion of the intended audience of this book might feel left out of Watts' vision on how mothers can address the gun lobby. More importantly, this leaves out the story of how those of us who are privileged can advocate for the women who cannot speak and act for themselves when it comes to this issue... One thing I really liked about the book - at the end, Watts offers advice for how to speak to your children about mass shootings and throughout the book there are a number of valuable 'resources' that can support parents around this issue. I just wish I had this kind of information months or even years ago because, as a parent, I never feel like I have solid advice that is useful around these difficult conversations with our kids.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Scalacpa

    Excellent book that covers the grassroots beginnings of Moms demand action for gun sense in America. The book is inspirational and gives me some hope for our country. A few quotes for the book were noteworthy to me: "As Hillary Clinton said, there's no such thing as other people's children" " The NRA's leadership has made a whole bevy of offensive remarks about women: when then-governor Sarah Palin considered NRA board member Wayne Anthony Ross for attorney general in Alaska, reports surfaced that Excellent book that covers the grassroots beginnings of Moms demand action for gun sense in America. The book is inspirational and gives me some hope for our country. A few quotes for the book were noteworthy to me: "As Hillary Clinton said, there's no such thing as other people's children" " The NRA's leadership has made a whole bevy of offensive remarks about women: when then-governor Sarah Palin considered NRA board member Wayne Anthony Ross for attorney general in Alaska, reports surfaced that in 1991 he allegedly defended the rights of men to rape their wives, saying, "If a guy can't rape his wife, who's he gonna rape?" And during a debate on the Equal Rights Amendment, he apparently said, " There wouldn't be an issue with domestic violence if women would learn to keep their mouth shut." One needs to pay attention to the people that surrounds them and for whom they admire to understand their character. Look at the person in the White House, look at all of his cabinet members either resigning for ethical and/or legal problems. The head of his campaign in prison for 11 felonies, should have been for 22 felonies, if the one jury could have been convinced that he really had done what the evidence said he had done. A co-conspirator in campaign fraud for which his former attorney is serving jail time. Buddies with despots, high praise for a Saudi prince that have been linked to the killing of an American reporter. 22 legitimate accusations of rape. Wrong doing with his Trump organization non profit. All of these investigations have ceased once he was able to appoint his buddy as head of the justice system. All of these actions are corrupting our justice system, the rule of law and American values. At least Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense in America is making small victories.

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