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Every nation of the globe has unique tales to tell, whispers that settle in through the land, creatures or superstitions that enliven the night, but rarely do readers get to experience such a diversity of these voices in one place as in A World of Horror, the latest anthology book created by award-winning editor Eric J. Guignard, and beautifully illustrated by artist Steve Every nation of the globe has unique tales to tell, whispers that settle in through the land, creatures or superstitions that enliven the night, but rarely do readers get to experience such a diversity of these voices in one place as in A World of Horror, the latest anthology book created by award-winning editor Eric J. Guignard, and beautifully illustrated by artist Steve Lines. Enclosed within these pages are twenty-two all-new dark and speculative fiction stories written by authors from around the world that explore the myths and monsters, fables and fears of their homelands. • In “The Wife Who Didn’t Eat,” a modest Japanese farmer’s prayer to the gods comes true . . . much to his dismay. • In “Things I Do For Love,” the intertwined lives in an Indonesian village are upended by as diabolical and otherworldly a device as a simple whisper. • In “Mutshidzi,” an African teen must raise her brother and run the household after their mother dies. But there is so much to do . . . • In “Sick Cats in Small Spaces,” a vacationing Australian family come upon a ghost town where the actual ghosts are bottled and kept. Also encounter the haunting things that stalk those radioactive forests outside Chernobyl in Ukraine; sample the curious dishes one may eat in Canada; beware the veldt monster that mirrors yourself in Uganda; or simply battle mountain trolls alongside Alfred Nobel in Sweden. These stories and more are found within A World of Horror. Enter and discover, truly, there's no place on the planet devoid of frights, thrills, and wondrous imagination! Table of Contents includes: “Introduction: Diversity in Fiction” by Eric J. Guignard “Mutshidzi” by Mohale Mashigo (South Africa) “One Last Wayang” by L Chan (Singapore) “Things I Do For Love” by Nadia Bulkin (Indonesia) “On a Wooden Plate, On a Winter’s Night” by David Nickle (Canada) “Country Boy” by Billie Sue Mosiman (United States of America) “The Wife Who Didn't Eat” by Thersa Matsuura (Japan) “The Disappeared” by Kristine Ong Muslim (Philippines) “The Secret Life of the Unclaimed” by Suyi Davies Okungbowa (Nigeria) “How Alfred Nobel Got His Mojo” by Johannes Pinter (Sweden) “Sick Cats in Small Spaces” by Kaaron Warren (Australia) “Obibi” by Dilman Dila (Uganda) “The Nightmare” by Rhea Daniel (India) “Chemirocha” by Charlie Human (South Africa) “Honey” by Valya Dudycz Lupescu (Ukraine) “Warning: Flammable, See Back Label” by Marcia Douglas (Jamaica) “Arlecchino” by Carla Negrini (Italy) “The Man at Table Nine” by Ray Cluley (England) “The Mantle of Flesh” by Ashlee Scheuerman (Australia) “The Shadows of Saint Urban” by Claudio Foti (Italy) “Warashi’s Grip” by Yukimi Ogawa (Japan) “The White Monkey” by Carlos Orsi (Brazil) “The West Wind” by David McGroarty (Scotland) ### PRAISE: “Guignard’s editorial prowess is evident throughout; he has selected works that are as shocking as they are thought-provoking. This breath of fresh air for horror readers shows the limitless possibilities of the genre.” —Publishers Weekly (starred review) “This is the book we need right now! Fresh voices from all over the world, bringing American audiences new ways to feel the fear. Horror is a universal genre and for too long we have only experienced one western version of it. No more. Get ready to experience a whole new world of terror.” —Becky Spratford; librarian, reviewer, RA for All: Horror “A cultural tour in the sacred art of horror—definitive proof that ghosts, ghouls, goblins, and more are equally terrifying in every corner of the world.” —Fanbase Press “A fresh collection of horror authors exploring monsters and myths from their homelands.” —Library Journal


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Every nation of the globe has unique tales to tell, whispers that settle in through the land, creatures or superstitions that enliven the night, but rarely do readers get to experience such a diversity of these voices in one place as in A World of Horror, the latest anthology book created by award-winning editor Eric J. Guignard, and beautifully illustrated by artist Steve Every nation of the globe has unique tales to tell, whispers that settle in through the land, creatures or superstitions that enliven the night, but rarely do readers get to experience such a diversity of these voices in one place as in A World of Horror, the latest anthology book created by award-winning editor Eric J. Guignard, and beautifully illustrated by artist Steve Lines. Enclosed within these pages are twenty-two all-new dark and speculative fiction stories written by authors from around the world that explore the myths and monsters, fables and fears of their homelands. • In “The Wife Who Didn’t Eat,” a modest Japanese farmer’s prayer to the gods comes true . . . much to his dismay. • In “Things I Do For Love,” the intertwined lives in an Indonesian village are upended by as diabolical and otherworldly a device as a simple whisper. • In “Mutshidzi,” an African teen must raise her brother and run the household after their mother dies. But there is so much to do . . . • In “Sick Cats in Small Spaces,” a vacationing Australian family come upon a ghost town where the actual ghosts are bottled and kept. Also encounter the haunting things that stalk those radioactive forests outside Chernobyl in Ukraine; sample the curious dishes one may eat in Canada; beware the veldt monster that mirrors yourself in Uganda; or simply battle mountain trolls alongside Alfred Nobel in Sweden. These stories and more are found within A World of Horror. Enter and discover, truly, there's no place on the planet devoid of frights, thrills, and wondrous imagination! Table of Contents includes: “Introduction: Diversity in Fiction” by Eric J. Guignard “Mutshidzi” by Mohale Mashigo (South Africa) “One Last Wayang” by L Chan (Singapore) “Things I Do For Love” by Nadia Bulkin (Indonesia) “On a Wooden Plate, On a Winter’s Night” by David Nickle (Canada) “Country Boy” by Billie Sue Mosiman (United States of America) “The Wife Who Didn't Eat” by Thersa Matsuura (Japan) “The Disappeared” by Kristine Ong Muslim (Philippines) “The Secret Life of the Unclaimed” by Suyi Davies Okungbowa (Nigeria) “How Alfred Nobel Got His Mojo” by Johannes Pinter (Sweden) “Sick Cats in Small Spaces” by Kaaron Warren (Australia) “Obibi” by Dilman Dila (Uganda) “The Nightmare” by Rhea Daniel (India) “Chemirocha” by Charlie Human (South Africa) “Honey” by Valya Dudycz Lupescu (Ukraine) “Warning: Flammable, See Back Label” by Marcia Douglas (Jamaica) “Arlecchino” by Carla Negrini (Italy) “The Man at Table Nine” by Ray Cluley (England) “The Mantle of Flesh” by Ashlee Scheuerman (Australia) “The Shadows of Saint Urban” by Claudio Foti (Italy) “Warashi’s Grip” by Yukimi Ogawa (Japan) “The White Monkey” by Carlos Orsi (Brazil) “The West Wind” by David McGroarty (Scotland) ### PRAISE: “Guignard’s editorial prowess is evident throughout; he has selected works that are as shocking as they are thought-provoking. This breath of fresh air for horror readers shows the limitless possibilities of the genre.” —Publishers Weekly (starred review) “This is the book we need right now! Fresh voices from all over the world, bringing American audiences new ways to feel the fear. Horror is a universal genre and for too long we have only experienced one western version of it. No more. Get ready to experience a whole new world of terror.” —Becky Spratford; librarian, reviewer, RA for All: Horror “A cultural tour in the sacred art of horror—definitive proof that ghosts, ghouls, goblins, and more are equally terrifying in every corner of the world.” —Fanbase Press “A fresh collection of horror authors exploring monsters and myths from their homelands.” —Library Journal

55 review for A World of Horror

  1. 4 out of 5

    Michael Flores

    This anthology, A WORLD OF HORROR, is simply superb. Well planned, well implemented, gorgeously designed, and fantastic stories. Almost every contribution in this book is worth the ticket of admission. I really appreciated the chance to read dark-natured fictions stories from all over the world in just one place. Surprisingly, it’s hard to find good horror stories from a diverse group of authors all brought together in one book, but the editor Eric J. Guignard succeeded in this admirably. Some o This anthology, A WORLD OF HORROR, is simply superb. Well planned, well implemented, gorgeously designed, and fantastic stories. Almost every contribution in this book is worth the ticket of admission. I really appreciated the chance to read dark-natured fictions stories from all over the world in just one place. Surprisingly, it’s hard to find good horror stories from a diverse group of authors all brought together in one book, but the editor Eric J. Guignard succeeded in this admirably. Some of my favorites were “Sick Cats in Small Spaces” by Kaaron Warren, where a family tests its bonds while bottling ghosts in an outback town. And “The Nightmare” by Rhea Daniel was very sensible and this slow-burn that took a surprising and multiply-shocking set of twists. “The West Wind” by David McGroarty was another slow burn that was just as thoughtful and psychological as any gothic tale of the ancient literaries. “The Secret Life of the Unclaimed” by Suyi Davies Okungbowa was terribly saddening, but a very realistic view of a “monster” in adolescence. And so many others. Again, just an excellent and fulfilling collection of well-written stories! (disclaimer: this book was provided in exchange for an honest review)

  2. 5 out of 5

    Bob/Sally

    A World of Horror, edited by Eric J. Guignard, is the longest lingering collection on the review shelves, an anthology I started exploring at the tail end of the summer. It was an entirely new-to-me slate of authors, which is probably why I lingered over it for so long. While there are a handful of Western stories - Canada, USA, England, Australia - the others are from South Africa, Eastern Europe, Latin America, Japan, Philippines, and more. A truly global slate of horror. That diversity was som A World of Horror, edited by Eric J. Guignard, is the longest lingering collection on the review shelves, an anthology I started exploring at the tail end of the summer. It was an entirely new-to-me slate of authors, which is probably why I lingered over it for so long. While there are a handful of Western stories - Canada, USA, England, Australia - the others are from South Africa, Eastern Europe, Latin America, Japan, Philippines, and more. A truly global slate of horror. That diversity was something of a challenge for me. Some of the stories were just too different from what I am used to, from what I look for in horror, that I struggled to find my way into them. Highlights for me included the weird horror of ON A WOODEN PLATE, ON A WINTER’S NIGHT David Nickle and THE MAN AT TABLE NINE by Ray Cluley; the body horror of THE SECRET LIFE OF THE UNCLAIMED by Suyi Davies Okungbowa; the creepy road trip horror of SICK CATS IN SMALL SPACES by Kaaron Warren; and HONEY by Valya Dudycz Lupescu, a story of ghosts and memories. https://beauty-in-ruins.blogspot.com/...

  3. 5 out of 5

    Joanna Parypinski

    I absolutely loved this anthology of horror stories from around the world, and I hope it's a herald of things to come as speculative fiction publishing continues to shift toward embracing diverse voices. The great thing about this book is that it offers a broad range of stories from various countries, like South Africa, Japan, Nigeria, Brazil, Italy, and more. With that incredible range, you feel like you really are getting to see different perspectives of horror from around the world that we wo I absolutely loved this anthology of horror stories from around the world, and I hope it's a herald of things to come as speculative fiction publishing continues to shift toward embracing diverse voices. The great thing about this book is that it offers a broad range of stories from various countries, like South Africa, Japan, Nigeria, Brazil, Italy, and more. With that incredible range, you feel like you really are getting to see different perspectives of horror from around the world that we wouldn't ordinarily get to experience, as readers, compiled all in one place. I especially liked that each story captured some element of the country it was from, either some particular voice, flavor, cultural experience, or mythology. That made it especially engaging and brought to life the purpose of the anthology. This entire enterprise feels like an untapped goldmine--I'd love to see a sequel to this with more stories from around the globe! Eric Guignard has done a great job compiling a diverse catalogue of compelling fiction here. I have a feeling this one is going to become an important part of every horror fan's bookshelf.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Anita Patel

    This whole book of bringing together authors from around the world was an exceptional idea, and beautifully executed both in terms of story content and in visual appeal (nod to artist Steve Lines!). There’s a great variety of stories and tones, exploring myths and fears and tastes from 22 authors (in 18 countries, with a few countries represented twice). I loved Rhea Daniel in India, and Kaaron Warren in Australia, and David McGroarty in Scotland, and Suyi Davies Okungbowa in Nigeria, and so man This whole book of bringing together authors from around the world was an exceptional idea, and beautifully executed both in terms of story content and in visual appeal (nod to artist Steve Lines!). There’s a great variety of stories and tones, exploring myths and fears and tastes from 22 authors (in 18 countries, with a few countries represented twice). I loved Rhea Daniel in India, and Kaaron Warren in Australia, and David McGroarty in Scotland, and Suyi Davies Okungbowa in Nigeria, and so many more. Great book all around, and very much recommended!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Ben Arzate

    Full Review A World of Horror is essential reading for fans of horror and dark fiction. The stories are all well-written, entertaining, and fascinating looks into the cultures from which they came. I hope that in the future Guignard will put together another book in the same vein. Full Review A World of Horror is essential reading for fans of horror and dark fiction. The stories are all well-written, entertaining, and fascinating looks into the cultures from which they came. I hope that in the future Guignard will put together another book in the same vein.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Scott

    An enjoyable collection of dark speculative fiction, horror, and general strangeness from around the world. My personal favorites were One Last Wayang, The Shadows of Saint Urban, and The Man At Table Nine - but most of the stories were a fun read, and only two were eventually skimmed. Absolutely recommended to anyone who enjoys a little bit of dark weirdness!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Ian Welke

    This anthology is wonderfully dangerous. In addition to a story from one of my favorite short story writers, Nadia Bulkin, this anthology has generated a giant list of writers I need to search for more material from. The stories in here are diverse not just in the author origins and tone, but they also vary in makeup so much that it felt like a course in world literature in one volume. A day after reading the final story and I’m still thinking not just about individual stories, but how mind expa This anthology is wonderfully dangerous. In addition to a story from one of my favorite short story writers, Nadia Bulkin, this anthology has generated a giant list of writers I need to search for more material from. The stories in here are diverse not just in the author origins and tone, but they also vary in makeup so much that it felt like a course in world literature in one volume. A day after reading the final story and I’m still thinking not just about individual stories, but how mind expanding the anthology is as a whole. Highly recommended.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Hayley

    It's rare that I find an anthology where every story is great, and this is one of them. I really enjoyed the variations of stories in the book - there are some fantastic monster stories, hauntings, and more. And one of the shortest stories in the book, "Warning: Flammable, See Back Label" disturbed me to no end. Some of my favorites were: On a Wooden Plate, on a Winter's Night by David Nickle (Canada) The Secret Life of the Unclaimed by Suyi Davies Okungbowa (Nigeria) Obibi by Dilman Dila (Uganda) It's rare that I find an anthology where every story is great, and this is one of them. I really enjoyed the variations of stories in the book - there are some fantastic monster stories, hauntings, and more. And one of the shortest stories in the book, "Warning: Flammable, See Back Label" disturbed me to no end. Some of my favorites were: On a Wooden Plate, on a Winter's Night by David Nickle (Canada) The Secret Life of the Unclaimed by Suyi Davies Okungbowa (Nigeria) Obibi by Dilman Dila (Uganda) Honey by Valya Dudycz Lupescu (Ukraine) Warning: Flammable, See Back Label by Marcia Douglas (Jamaica) The Shadows of Saint Urban by Claudio Foti (Italy) Warashi's Grip by Yukimi Ogawa (Japan) Incredible collection! I'll be keeping an eye out for these authors in the future - I was pleased to learn that Suyi Davies Okungbowa has a novel coming out later this year, which is going straight onto my TBR list. Great anthology; highly recommended.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Pamela Scott

    https://thebookloversboudoir.wordpres... (copy via @ericjguignard and voluntarily reviewed) This is my first time reading many of the authors in this anthology with the exception of Kaaron Warren and Ray Cluley. I love discovering new authors and this is one of the most enjoyable things about reading anthologies. I have a list of new authors to check out. I love horror fiction and have specific tastes. I enjoy everything except horror that is over the top and gory for the sake of being gory. I lov https://thebookloversboudoir.wordpres... (copy via @ericjguignard and voluntarily reviewed) This is my first time reading many of the authors in this anthology with the exception of Kaaron Warren and Ray Cluley. I love discovering new authors and this is one of the most enjoyable things about reading anthologies. I have a list of new authors to check out. I love horror fiction and have specific tastes. I enjoy everything except horror that is over the top and gory for the sake of being gory. I love horror that is subtle and unsettling. A World of Horror contains great examples of the horror I enjoy the most. The best stories are Things I Do for Love by Nadia Bulkin, The Wife Who Didn’t Eat by Thersa Matsuura, Sick Cats in Small Spaces by Kaaron Warren, The Man at Table Nine by Ray Cluley and The West Wind by David McGroarty.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jimmy Tam

    This is an anthology with horror or weird short stories written by writers from all around the world (aptly named, WORLD OF HORROR!). What a great idea and a great execution. The book is beautifully designed and there’s an artist with exceptional old school art. The stories are intense, raw. Some of them funny, bizarre, but all well written and thoroughly interesting to read these points of view from all over the world! Good job to editors and writers involved!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Lizzy Walker

    Review for Monster Librarian forthcoming. I love this anthology.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Erica Robyn Metcalf

    A World of Horror edited by Eric J. Guignard is an amazing collection of tales from all over the world! If you’re a horror fan, you have to check this one out! Full disclosure: I was given a free copy of this book from the editor in exchange for an honest review. This did not affect my rating in any way. This was such an awesome collection! I really loved how it was organized and how it allowed me to read from authors from many countries that I hadn’t read from before! Each tale had an illustration A World of Horror edited by Eric J. Guignard is an amazing collection of tales from all over the world! If you’re a horror fan, you have to check this one out! Full disclosure: I was given a free copy of this book from the editor in exchange for an honest review. This did not affect my rating in any way. This was such an awesome collection! I really loved how it was organized and how it allowed me to read from authors from many countries that I hadn’t read from before! Each tale had an illustration before it with a caption below that was pulled from the story. These illustrations were created by Steve Lines. On the page where we see the title, there was also a graphic to indicate which nation the writer was from as well as a lovely blurb from the editor that introduced the tale! Introduction: Diversity In Fiction by Eric J. Guignard I loved that the editor discussed why he wanted to undertake this project and how he went about completing it! He also included some stats that I was happy to learn! The diversity of the authors included in this book is awesome; 22 stories from 18 nations, with a 45/55 percent gender split! “Truly, there’s no shortage of tales to be shared from the rest of the world, but not everyone has the opportunity. Which is why I wanted to undertake this venture.” Mutshidzi by Mohale Mashigo – 5/5 South Africa Heartbreaking and spooky! These two siblings are so brave. I loved how positive Mutshidizi was with what she was going through as she tried to keep the home together after the death of their mother. One Last Wayang by L Chan – 5/5 Singapore I loved this one! A tale of monsters and shadows that are alive, told to a grandson by a grandfather. The last line really got me! Things I Do For Love by Nadia Bulkin – 3/5 Indonesia From curses to seers, this one was so interesting! On A Wooden Plate, On A Winter’s Night by David Nickle Canada I unfortunately missed something here… Country Boy by Billie Sue Mosiman – 3/5 United States Phew! What a smart kid! This tale was about a town where a murderer was on the loose. When shovels started going missing, a young kid that was a fan of Sherlock books solved the case. But would the adults listen to him? The Wife Who Didn’t Eat by Thersa Matsuura – 3/5 Japan Creepy! I’m gonna have to do research on this fairy tale! The Disappeared by Kristine Ong Muslim – 4/5 Philippines A very sad and spooky piece of flash fiction about a river that claims a life once a year. The Secret Life of the Unclaimed by Suyi Davies Okungbowa – 3/5 Nigeria Oh goodness! This poor teen. What a nightmare! Puberty is rough enough, but add a more unnatural transformation to the mix… How Alfred Nobel Got His Mojo by Johannes Pinter – 3/5 Sweden What a fun but heartbreaking tale! Sick Cats in Small Spaces by Kaaron Warren – 3/5 Australia Oh, this was a neat one! I kept waiting for the horror to show, and when it did… wonderful. Obibi by Dilman Dila – 4/5 Uganda Phew! What a dark and sad start. the chase in the woods was certainly creepy! I loved the shapeshifting element and how this one turned out! The Nightmare by Rhea Daniel – 4/5 India Interesting! I did not see that ending coming. I really enjoyed this one but I was so nervous for the girl the whole time. Chemirocha by Charlie Human – 3/5 South Africa What an interesting tale! While this one wasn’t horror focused, there was an underlying unsettling vibe. Honey by Valya Dudycz Lupescu – 5/5 Ukraine This was definitely one of my favorites from the collection! I really felt for the characters and didn’t want harm to befall either of them. There’s also just something about homes in the middle of the woods that draw me in. Add the setting of this one and the fear around both the radiation from Chernobyl and unseen monsters… this was right up my alley. Warming: Flammable, See Back Label by Marcia Douglas – 4/5 Jamaica Woah! This one was like a fever dream! I’m not sure what exactly was happening, but it was eerie! Arlecchino by Carla Negrini – 4/5 Italy Yikes! This poor guy. What a tale! Nothing like being haunted by monsters from childhood… The Man at Table Nine by Ray Cluley – 4/5 England How odd and creepy!! What a premise. The Mantle of Flesh by Ashlee Scheuerman- 3/5 Australia A eerie tale of family tradition, lore, and the quest to end a cycle. The Shadows of Saint Urban by Claudio Foti – 3/5 Italy How spooky! Not a good one if shadows already creep you out. Also, not a brilliant idea to finish the tale and then immediately go into your basement to gather your Spring decorations either… Warashi’s Grip by Yukimi Ogawa – 4/5 Japan Woah! This tale. I did not see the end coming! So frustrating and sad that it was all tied to selfishness. The White Monkey by Carlos Orsi – 3/5 Brazil Another tale similar to a fever dream and quite spooky! The West Wind by David McGroarty – 3/5 Scotland Another sad and spooky one! My Final Thoughts This was such a great collection! I had so much fun picking it up from time to time to read a tale. I highly recommend this collection to those that love horror, and to those that are just dipping into the genre!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Elle

    Full review at Dead Head Reviews The premise of this book is absolutely fantastic – to seek out as many different stories from as many different countries as possible. And though there are a couple of stories from countries very familiar to Western horror readers, more come from places likely unfamiliar to English speakers. Inside this anthology, readers will find stories from Japan, Ukraine, Nigeria, Singapore, Sweden, Philippines and more. And each, in their own way, is an absolute delight. I am Full review at Dead Head Reviews The premise of this book is absolutely fantastic – to seek out as many different stories from as many different countries as possible. And though there are a couple of stories from countries very familiar to Western horror readers, more come from places likely unfamiliar to English speakers. Inside this anthology, readers will find stories from Japan, Ukraine, Nigeria, Singapore, Sweden, Philippines and more. And each, in their own way, is an absolute delight. I am constantly blown away by anthologies, the sheer dedication of the editors and the talent of various authors, gathered in one place, but this is a collection taken to the next level. The variety provides something unique, allowing readers to delve into the myths of places they might perhaps never visit. Personal favourites – Honey¸ set in the Chernobyl exclusion zone, where strange creatures roam. The Shadows of Saint Urban, about the dangers lurking in the shadows, and the madness found within, which feels almost like it could be a Carpenter movie. How Alfred Nobel Got His Mojo, where Nobel discovers the true extent of dynamite’s destructive powers. Sick Cats in Small Spaces, about bottles found in the Australian outback, and the spirits trapped within.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Irene

    I suppose I say it too often, but I love horror anthologies. They are especially good for when I'm between novels or don't have a lot of time and just want to read a few pages here and there, on a lunch break or before bed. What I really loved about this anthology is that it took me on a trip around the world without having to leave the safety of my home. I also loved that each story was accompanied by an illustration, because what good is a trip around the world without pictures! All of these a I suppose I say it too often, but I love horror anthologies. They are especially good for when I'm between novels or don't have a lot of time and just want to read a few pages here and there, on a lunch break or before bed. What I really loved about this anthology is that it took me on a trip around the world without having to leave the safety of my home. I also loved that each story was accompanied by an illustration, because what good is a trip around the world without pictures! All of these authors are new to me except for the dearly departed Billie Sue Mosiman. I have been a fan of her work for ages, she was a talented writer and a wonderful lady. I found this book to be an interesting mix of the supernatural, serial killers, and folklore and a peek into the customs and superstitions of other countries. I enjoyed every story but the ones that are still etched in my mind are On a Wooden Plate, On a Winter’s Night which was not just the normal reunion story that I thought it was at first. I love the way it surprised me. Country Boy, which was about a killer on the loose, The Wife Who Didn't Eat, about a lonely man who has his prayers answered... sort of. The Secret Life of the Unclaimed which I can't really go into without spoiling it for you Sick Cats in Small Spaces finds a family on what is liable to be their last ever family road trip... I would recommend this anthology to any horror fan, particularly if you are wondering where is the diversity in horror? Because here it is! 4 out of 5 stars I received a complimentary copy for review.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Nicole Willson

    Awesome collection-great variety of stories.

  16. 4 out of 5

    E.F.

    Chilling, suspenseful. An excellent collection.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Paula Hartman

    Like most anthologies, this was a hit or a miss but it was great to read stories based on folklore from around the world.

  18. 5 out of 5

    David Agranoff

    Cool book full Audio review coming with my Dickheads co-host Anthony Trevino coming soon.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Obelia

  20. 5 out of 5

    David Anderson

  21. 5 out of 5

    Bruna

  22. 5 out of 5

    Kate

  23. 5 out of 5

    Becky Spratford

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jo Kaplan

  25. 4 out of 5

    Marian

  26. 4 out of 5

    Shelby Roberts

  27. 5 out of 5

    Vanessa

  28. 5 out of 5

    Eric Guignard

  29. 5 out of 5

    Alyssa A Brewer

  30. 5 out of 5

    Bernard Leman

  31. 5 out of 5

    Laura

  32. 4 out of 5

    Astral

  33. 4 out of 5

    Tracy Fitzmaurice

  34. 4 out of 5

    David J Corwell

  35. 4 out of 5

    Karen Clark

  36. 4 out of 5

    Reem

  37. 5 out of 5

    Emily

  38. 4 out of 5

    Lauren

  39. 4 out of 5

    Katie

  40. 4 out of 5

    Steph

  41. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth Olesh

  42. 4 out of 5

    Terri

  43. 5 out of 5

    Hebah

  44. 4 out of 5

    Nikki

  45. 5 out of 5

    Emmy

  46. 5 out of 5

    Todd

  47. 4 out of 5

    Syntha Green

  48. 5 out of 5

    Michael Joseph Schumann

  49. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

  50. 4 out of 5

    Carson Winter

  51. 4 out of 5

    Dani Rodriguez

  52. 4 out of 5

    Intellectual Magpie

  53. 4 out of 5

    Brandee

  54. 4 out of 5

    Arisawe Hampton

  55. 5 out of 5

    The BookBug

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