counter create hit Take Me with You - Download Free eBook
Ads Banner
Hot Best Seller

Take Me with You

Availability: Ready to download

Eden, Eli, Marwan, and Ilanka barely know each other beyond having a class or two together. But when they are all summoned via messaging app to an empty classroom after school, they find a small cube sitting on a desk. Its sides light up with rules for them: Do not tell anyone about the device. Never leave the device unattended. And then, Take me with you . . . or else. At fi Eden, Eli, Marwan, and Ilanka barely know each other beyond having a class or two together. But when they are all summoned via messaging app to an empty classroom after school, they find a small cube sitting on a desk. Its sides light up with rules for them: Do not tell anyone about the device. Never leave the device unattended. And then, Take me with you . . . or else. At first they think it's some kind of prank or a social experiment orchestrated by the school administration. Still, they follow its instructions until the newly-formed group starts to splinter. Nobody has time for these games--their lives are complicated enough. But the device seems increasingly invested in the private details of their lives. And disobeying its rules has scary--even life-threatening--consequences . . .


Compare
Ads Banner

Eden, Eli, Marwan, and Ilanka barely know each other beyond having a class or two together. But when they are all summoned via messaging app to an empty classroom after school, they find a small cube sitting on a desk. Its sides light up with rules for them: Do not tell anyone about the device. Never leave the device unattended. And then, Take me with you . . . or else. At fi Eden, Eli, Marwan, and Ilanka barely know each other beyond having a class or two together. But when they are all summoned via messaging app to an empty classroom after school, they find a small cube sitting on a desk. Its sides light up with rules for them: Do not tell anyone about the device. Never leave the device unattended. And then, Take me with you . . . or else. At first they think it's some kind of prank or a social experiment orchestrated by the school administration. Still, they follow its instructions until the newly-formed group starts to splinter. Nobody has time for these games--their lives are complicated enough. But the device seems increasingly invested in the private details of their lives. And disobeying its rules has scary--even life-threatening--consequences . . .

30 review for Take Me with You

  1. 4 out of 5

    ScrappyMags

    Note to self: if I ever see a strange little box that starts talking to me? Yeah I’m out. And I’m side-eyeing my old Teddy Ruxpin. I see you bro. Shortest Summary Ever: 4 teens, all different, with no apparent connection are summoned to a classroom one day after school. In the room sits a small black box. It starts delivering messages such as “do not leave the box unattended” and “do not ignore me” ...or else. From there the box, named Aizel, leads each student in different directions into their Note to self: if I ever see a strange little box that starts talking to me? Yeah I’m out. And I’m side-eyeing my old Teddy Ruxpin. I see you bro. Shortest Summary Ever: 4 teens, all different, with no apparent connection are summoned to a classroom one day after school. In the room sits a small black box. It starts delivering messages such as “do not leave the box unattended” and “do not ignore me” ...or else. From there the box, named Aizel, leads each student in different directions into their different and complicated lives... My thoughts: I thoroughly enjoyed the taut suspense and the questions raised about technology and social media. This isn’t Sci-fi... this technology exists now and there are lawsuits pending for such things as the selling of data, spying, hacking etc - and this AI technology is real. That’s the part that makes the hair rise. I applaud the author for this intriguing idea. I’m actually VERY surprised at the low rating but sometimes I hate books others love. 🤷🏼‍♀️🤷🏼‍♀️ I’ll never look at “learning toys “ the same way and I think that’s the quality in this novel - it’s a “thinker.” Remember The laughable Chucky doll from the 80s? It was laughable because no - nobody will be resurrected in a doll with voodoo. But can something “live” in “the cloud” forever? What IS Aziel? Could something technological become so advanced that it does as it’s programmed - learns for itself until it’s aware of the programming... and then what? Now cue the next 80’s movie - The Terminator and your mind will be in my realm. Fascinating questions all from this book. Also enjoyed the diverse characters - Marwan, facing xenophobia, Eli - a quiet gamer who is better at his fake game lives than his real one, Eden - overcoming the death of her father, and Ilanka - pretty and social media savvy but mostly lonely. All my reviews available at scrappymags.com Genre: Mystery/thriller in the tech world. Recommend to: Book clubs - some great controversial topics to explore here, my students, and honestly best-seller fans or those looking for a book that brings forward issues. A YA book thoroughly enjoyed by this not-so-young person! Not recommended to: if you hate technology (though note I’m NOT techy and loved it). Thank you to the author, Bloomsbury USA and Netgalley for the ARC and my always-honest reviews. Thanks for making me side-eye my old Teddy Ruxpin too.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Chelsea Humphrey

    As someone who is not the target audience for this novel, please take my review and thoughts lightly. This book could have been excellent; the ideas were there and the potential was endless. Unfortunately, this story only skimmed the surface of those ideas, and I was really disappointed that we didn't receive the closure expected from this type of book. Overall, just not for me.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Julie Zantopoulos

    I was all over the thriller mystery train but this book fell so flat. Also, it’s grossly mis-shelved because this is a sci-fi. Just not a book for me. CW: Bullying, racism, xenophobia, hate crimes and vandalism, death of a parent, death of a grandparent, and psychological distress/torture.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Kelly Roberson

    Solid 4.5 out of 5 stars. I honestly loved this book so much more than I expected! The action starts pretty much immediately, and it had me hooked after the first 10 pages. The author did an amazing job of creating super realistic and believable characters and made the life they were dealing with in Queens feel like something that would be happening right now. The book was spot on in handling some real life issues including hate crimes but also dealt with our reliance on our phone and devices. I Solid 4.5 out of 5 stars. I honestly loved this book so much more than I expected! The action starts pretty much immediately, and it had me hooked after the first 10 pages. The author did an amazing job of creating super realistic and believable characters and made the life they were dealing with in Queens feel like something that would be happening right now. The book was spot on in handling some real life issues including hate crimes but also dealt with our reliance on our phone and devices. It made me thing a lot about artificial intelligence and how scary it could actually get the more it is developed! Overall this was an awesome book and such a fun read, and I would definitely pick up more from this author.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Stacee

    I loved the premise and the cover and sadly, the story didn’t quite deliver. The four MCs are all wildly different and I liked that. The POVs did switch often and from that I never felt settled into the story. There are a lot of secondary characters and some of them didn’t seem necessary. If either of those things were intentional to throw off the story, I’m applauding. Plot wise, it was okay. The start had a decent amount of tension and the build up was promising. As things progressed, I was dr I loved the premise and the cover and sadly, the story didn’t quite deliver. The four MCs are all wildly different and I liked that. The POVs did switch often and from that I never felt settled into the story. There are a lot of secondary characters and some of them didn’t seem necessary. If either of those things were intentional to throw off the story, I’m applauding. Plot wise, it was okay. The start had a decent amount of tension and the build up was promising. As things progressed, I was drawn in and intrigued at where it was going. Annnnnnd then the reveal fell so flat. Overall, it had a lot of promise, but didn’t work for me...especially the last few chapters. **Huge thanks to Bloomsbury for providing the arc free of charge**

  6. 5 out of 5

    Sandy O'Brien

    I was stoked when I got an ARC because I LOVED her previous book The Leaving. 4 unlikely teenagers are messaged to meet in an empty classroom after school. On the desk is a black box that begins to make demands... Take me with you. Don’t leave me alone. Don’t tell anyone. Can they work together to follow the rules or will they suffer the consequences? Who created the cube and is controlling it? I loved the story line and how their lives started to interweave with each other. It was hard to stop readin I was stoked when I got an ARC because I LOVED her previous book The Leaving. 4 unlikely teenagers are messaged to meet in an empty classroom after school. On the desk is a black box that begins to make demands... Take me with you. Don’t leave me alone. Don’t tell anyone. Can they work together to follow the rules or will they suffer the consequences? Who created the cube and is controlling it? I loved the story line and how their lives started to interweave with each other. It was hard to stop reading at the end of the chapters because I just wanted to know more and figure out who was behind it all. The book as a whole was great but the ending was a bit lack luster and disappointing to me.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Megan

    HELLO_WORLD If you follow my reviews, then you know that I love SciFi with every ounce of my being—especially SciFi that addresses technology, cultural differences, and our perception of reality. TAKE ME WITH YOU is a YA SciFi about a device that mysteriously appears in a classroom and bosses around a group of teens, and it touches on each of these topics. There are two particularly interesting plot threads here. There’s the device itself, which becomes increasingly more dangerous as it begins lea HELLO_WORLD If you follow my reviews, then you know that I love SciFi with every ounce of my being—especially SciFi that addresses technology, cultural differences, and our perception of reality. TAKE ME WITH YOU is a YA SciFi about a device that mysteriously appears in a classroom and bosses around a group of teens, and it touches on each of these topics. There are two particularly interesting plot threads here. There’s the device itself, which becomes increasingly more dangerous as it begins learning novel ways to threaten and coerce the teens to force them to do its bidding. The rules are strange and unsettling at first, but just wait until the rules start changing. The mystery behind what the device is and where it came from is built layer by layer, leaving me dying to know what this object is really all about. Then there are the characters. These four teenagers would never have interacted on their own, but the device brings them together and changes their lives. I loved the inclusion of different cultures and the fact that racism was addressed and portrayed in a realistic way, forcing the characters into some uncomfortable situations. The ending is the reason this book isn’t a 5-star read; while I enjoyed the fast pace and multiple POVs, I was a little disappointed that the “reveal” was vague and overshadowed by intense action scenes. Thank you to NetGalley for the free copy in exchange for an honest review.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Laura Gardner

    Thanks to @taraaltebrando and @bloomsburypublishing for this free book to read and review! . . . I’m on the floor in sweatpants and slippers. One kid is doing Epic on the couch and the other one is on @stmath upstairs. Which means I had time to read!!!!!! . . . ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️/5 for this twisty thriller! Students who love ONE OF US IS LYING will enjoy TAKE ME WITH YOU. Artificial intelligence gone very, very wrong brings 4 relative strangers together. Eli, Eden, Marwan and Ilanka must work together to try and Thanks to @taraaltebrando and @bloomsburypublishing for this free book to read and review! . . . I’m on the floor in sweatpants and slippers. One kid is doing Epic on the couch and the other one is on @stmath upstairs. Which means I had time to read!!!!!! . . . ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️/5 for this twisty thriller! Students who love ONE OF US IS LYING will enjoy TAKE ME WITH YOU. Artificial intelligence gone very, very wrong brings 4 relative strangers together. Eli, Eden, Marwan and Ilanka must work together to try and discover what the device wants, where it comes from and how to destroy it. There are rules—never leave the device unattended, tell no one and “take me with you.” If they disobey the rules, there are serious consequences. Things I didn’t love: Ilanka and Eli’s POV aren’t in here until after page 75. Why? Also—the climax is a bit anti-climactic. I did like all 4 characters and their arcs. Overall, this is good and it will be popular! . . . Recommended for grades 8+. Out June 23, 2020! . . . #middleschoollibrarian #middleschoollibrary #library #librarian #futurereadylibs #iteachlibrary #bookstagrammer #bookstagram #librariesofinstagram #librariansofinstagram #librariesfollowlibraries #librarylife #librarianlife #schoollibrarian #iteach #librarylove #booksbooksbooks #amreading #bibliophile #schoollibrariansrock #bookreview #bookrecommendation #igreads #malibrary #msla #mediaspecialist

  9. 5 out of 5

    Shar // sunsnacksseries

    Thank you to NetGalley and Bloomsbury imprint for the copy in exchange for an honest review. The concept of Take Me With You was incredibly intriguing. As soon as I read the synopsis, I knew I needed to get my hands on this book. The story was quick and entertaining, although I felt the ending was lack-luster. I felt like there was so much build up, I would've liked a little more of an exciting ending and answers to some questions I had throughout the book. That being said, it was an entertaining Thank you to NetGalley and Bloomsbury imprint for the copy in exchange for an honest review. The concept of Take Me With You was incredibly intriguing. As soon as I read the synopsis, I knew I needed to get my hands on this book. The story was quick and entertaining, although I felt the ending was lack-luster. I felt like there was so much build up, I would've liked a little more of an exciting ending and answers to some questions I had throughout the book. That being said, it was an entertaining YA thriller. I recommend this book if you love technology-based thrillers.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Casey

    Thank you to Netgalley and to the publisher for providing me with a free ARC in exchange for an honest review. Right away we notice the diversity in this book which is great. We have 4 main characters, one of which is from an Egyptian family, another is from a Russian family. I did find that there were some stereotypes in this book (the middle eastern family owns a restaurant and the Russian family is up to some illegal activity). I will let you decide if that bothers you. It was intriguing trying Thank you to Netgalley and to the publisher for providing me with a free ARC in exchange for an honest review. Right away we notice the diversity in this book which is great. We have 4 main characters, one of which is from an Egyptian family, another is from a Russian family. I did find that there were some stereotypes in this book (the middle eastern family owns a restaurant and the Russian family is up to some illegal activity). I will let you decide if that bothers you. It was intriguing trying to figure out what the device wanted. At first I had one idea in place but then realized do to events the device caused that it was most certainly not what I had first thought. In the end I was a little disappointed with the outcome, and it felt like it wasn't really explained well enough. We did get some detail, but I would have liked it if things were made a little more clear. As for the characters I sympathized most Ilanka, and least with Eli. I'm not sure if Eli was supposed to be an antagonist or not, but honestly I didn't like him much. He reacts so differently to the device than most people would, and those in the book do it makes it hard to connect with him. Overall I'd say with the exception of Eli, all of the characters developed. The overall plot was interesting, but I felt it could have been more . I found it more frustrating at times rather than tense. I wish more tension was built up and things felt more immediate. It was weird to me how unconcerned the characters felt at times about exposing their data to the device, or how they didn't think it could penetrate other devices in the home (alexa) after what they had seen it do. It just didn't make sense to me. If they were all really afraid of it they wouldn't have taken any chances. To me this book reads as a "what not to do" with technology. All technology, not just the device. How vulnerable we are when we allow things to listen to us all the time. I liked the premise of the book and did enjoy reading it but I think it missed the mark for a homerun. Follow me on my blog Tayside Book Blog

  11. 5 out of 5

    Chidimma Desiree

    1/5 stars (maybe 1.5 stars) “Take Me With You” by Tara Altebrando is a young adult mystery about four teenagers brought together by a simple text message asking to meet with their music teacher in his classroom. The teens soon learn that the message was in fact not sent by their teacher but from an anonymous number through a mysterious device. The device urges them to “take me with you.” Then the story moves along as the teens realize that this device and the rules that accompany it is more than 1/5 stars (maybe 1.5 stars) “Take Me With You” by Tara Altebrando is a young adult mystery about four teenagers brought together by a simple text message asking to meet with their music teacher in his classroom. The teens soon learn that the message was in fact not sent by their teacher but from an anonymous number through a mysterious device. The device urges them to “take me with you.” Then the story moves along as the teens realize that this device and the rules that accompany it is more than what they thought they were getting themselves into. This book had a lot of potential yet it lived up to none of it. I love the trope of strangers with seemingly nothing in common getting put together because a situation/event, but I feel as if the story didn’t utilize this trope at all. Usually in thrillers with this plot it’s later revealed what these strangers had in common, but the book never does that. The characters were very one dimensional and almost had no personality. I struggled to find something to relate to, they were all very cliche teens with very cliche teen problems. I thought the device in this book would make the characters engage in dangerous/illegal acts or there was a purpose of the device that the author will delve into, but again that never happened. I felt as if nothing happened in this book even though I know events did take place. There was nothing thrilling or intriguing about this book. I felt myself just wanting it to be over already. The ending of this book was such a disappointment and very lackluster. The explanation of the device was very much a cop out and in my opinion the author did not do a good job of explaining the purpose of the device and why all of the events with the device took place. The author never went into detail in why the device chose the four teenagers which I think was an important plot line. The book had a very young adult contemporary ending and the tone was very off for a young adult mystery. I left the book thinking “is that it?” - This book was sent to me for review through netgalley-

  12. 5 out of 5

    Liberty

    Actual rating: 3.5 Stars. First, a big thank you to NetGalley and Bloomsbury YA for the eARC. I was given a copy in exchange for an honest review. This combination Sci-Fi/Horror novel comes out on June 23, 2020. The premise? Four high school students who hardly know each other are summoned into a classroom where a small electronic cube is waiting for them. It gives them a few simple rules: do not tell anyone about the device, never leave the device unattended, take me with you...or else. This boo Actual rating: 3.5 Stars. First, a big thank you to NetGalley and Bloomsbury YA for the eARC. I was given a copy in exchange for an honest review. This combination Sci-Fi/Horror novel comes out on June 23, 2020. The premise? Four high school students who hardly know each other are summoned into a classroom where a small electronic cube is waiting for them. It gives them a few simple rules: do not tell anyone about the device, never leave the device unattended, take me with you...or else. This book was my first foray into the combination of Science Fiction and Horror. I’m not normally a big fan of Mystery/Thriller/Horror novels, but this combination is really doing it for me. While I did feel like this story fell a little flat, I’m now pumped to see what other books I can find with this genre pairing. This book is compulsively readable. I binge read the last roughly 75% in one afternoon. I was planning on taking several days to read this, but I didn’t want to stop. I had to know what was going on with this AI. And that’s also why I felt this book fell a little flat for me. I felt like the book was open ended and it made me feel a little cheated for getting so invested. In the end, I had questions that I felt like should have been answered. I did feel like the world and the characters were well rounded. It didn’t seem like the only thing going on in their lives was this device. It was also nice to see how their reactions to each other developed as the device got weirder and weirder. I just needed a little more at the end (I should do a shot every time I think a book “needs more” I swear) to explain it in a believable way instead of leaving me with questions. Still a solid and fun read.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Eva 🌻

    I DNF this book around 20%. From the beginning the story or characters didn't draw me in, I just wasn't interested in what was happening. I also found the characters to be lean heavily into stereotypes/assumptions which I wasn't impressed by. I didn't "get it", the premise seemed a bit more sci-fi, which was misleading. I found the writing to be kind of chunky and there were so many added details that were completely unnecessary, I was skimming right from the beginning. I understand that the box I DNF this book around 20%. From the beginning the story or characters didn't draw me in, I just wasn't interested in what was happening. I also found the characters to be lean heavily into stereotypes/assumptions which I wasn't impressed by. I didn't "get it", the premise seemed a bit more sci-fi, which was misleading. I found the writing to be kind of chunky and there were so many added details that were completely unnecessary, I was skimming right from the beginning. I understand that the box is the driving force behind the story but it didn't give enough reasons for the kids not to ignore or toss it right from the beginning, I was waiting for that to happen. Hopefully others have better luck with this one. Thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for the free preview in exchange for an honest review.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Alicia

    Thank you to Bloomsbury for sending me an ARC via netgalley in exchange for an honest review. 4/5 stars. This was a good read! I enjoyed the story, and I liked the characters. The whole thing with the device was slightly creepy and very uncomfortable especially as things started to progress in the story. I wouldn’t say it was a full-thriller, for me at least, but it was definitely a unique read with well-rounded characters and a plot that had good pacing. Everything made sense when it was explai Thank you to Bloomsbury for sending me an ARC via netgalley in exchange for an honest review. 4/5 stars. This was a good read! I enjoyed the story, and I liked the characters. The whole thing with the device was slightly creepy and very uncomfortable especially as things started to progress in the story. I wouldn’t say it was a full-thriller, for me at least, but it was definitely a unique read with well-rounded characters and a plot that had good pacing. Everything made sense when it was explained, and it was explained as the characters figured it out so I had the chance to take guesses at what exactly I thought was going on! (I was wrong. Repeatedly.) One thing I wasn’t a big fan of was the formatting. I’m not sure if it was because I was reading an eBook version of this ARC, but some of the lines would be like this and I found it to be really annoying because it interrupts the flow of the sentence. I’m not sure if this was an eBook formatting issue or if it was intentional but it seemed kind out of place. The book also doesn’t have chapters. It switches between the POVs of Eden, Eli, Marwan, and Ilanka, but we stay in third person the whole time. I didn’t mind the POV switches, but it would happen in the middle of a page and again it kind of interrupted the flow. Overall though I enjoyed reading this book, and if you like some unconventional type thriller books, or if you like stories about creepy AI, then I’d suggest checking this one out.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Becky B

    4 teens receive a notice from a classroom app that their music teacher wants to meet them after school. But when they arrive, the music teacher isn’t there. There is, however, a little black cube that tells them to not leave the device unattended…or else, right as a fire alarm goes off. One of the teens decides to grab the device on her way out, and starts them on a crazy chain of events. The device is very insistent that its demands be followed, and starts handing out disturbing consequences wh 4 teens receive a notice from a classroom app that their music teacher wants to meet them after school. But when they arrive, the music teacher isn’t there. There is, however, a little black cube that tells them to not leave the device unattended…or else, right as a fire alarm goes off. One of the teens decides to grab the device on her way out, and starts them on a crazy chain of events. The device is very insistent that its demands be followed, and starts handing out disturbing consequences when it isn’t obeyed. Eden, Eli, Marwan, and Ilanka have their own lives and issues to deal with. Eden is grieving the recent death of her father and trying to figure out if a guy she met at the movies likes her or not, Eli is lonely and watching his grandfather slowly die, Ilanka is a poor little Russian-American rich girl with everything she could ever want materially but little quality time with her parents and only parent-approved friends, Marwan is trying to get a soccer scholarship so he can get out of the city next year and his family’s Egyptian restaurant has been the victim of hate crimes. So they could do without the added stress of a manipulative and powerful device invading their lives. Why did the device pick them? None of them have anything in common they can think of. Who sent it? And what is its end game? This was very quick to grab my attention and keep me sucked in. I was so curious as to what was going on. The cube is intense, short on what it will tell the teens, and crazy in its consequences. It gets intense at times. The book also makes you think about how much technology you use daily. It doesn’t condemn all tech use, it just makes you think about how much you use it and whether or not it is controlling you. I think it really helps that I just read Rebooting AI by Marcus & Davis so I feel like I have a much clearer picture of how much of this is really possible and how much teeters into scifi. (If this book freaks you out, I suggest hunting down a copy of Rebooting AI.) The background stuff going on in each of the teen’s lives was interesting and most readers should relate to at least one of them. It helped you care about them and what was going on with the cube more. It also helps make the story that much richer that the teens realize that these other strangers, or just names with faces have their own issues and challenges and may not be the person they assumed from afar. It’s always a good reminder that strangers have full lives and their own issues and are rarely who we think they are based on appearances. Highly recommended to those who like thrillers, contemporary fiction, and very light scifi stories about AI. Notes on content [based on the ARC]: About 5-6 mild swears. No sex scenes. One girl is being pressured by a guy to send “fun” pictures, it mentions she takes some in revealing clothing but deletes them. (In the end, there’s a positive message about how guys are creeps and gross to even ask for these.) One of the teen girls spent a movie kissing a guy. One of the teen's mom's may or may not be in an affair. Marwan is being bullied and his family restaurant is egged and then their window is broken by vandals with messages about “going home.” There is a positive peaceful resolution to this. Two deaths are mentioned that happen off page with no description. I received an ARC of this title from the publisher through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Chloe

    *Spoiler free* I stumbled across this book while pursuing Goodreads and was instantly intrigued. A small cube mysteriously shows up in four teens lives, providing them with a set of rules to follow. If they don't, there are dire consequences. While I don't read a ton of thrillers, this seemed like a great one to try out! While I enjoyed reading this, it also left me a bit disappointed and frustrated. I feel like this book just touched the surface of what this concept. I was expecting more tension, *Spoiler free* I stumbled across this book while pursuing Goodreads and was instantly intrigued. A small cube mysteriously shows up in four teens lives, providing them with a set of rules to follow. If they don't, there are dire consequences. While I don't read a ton of thrillers, this seemed like a great one to try out! While I enjoyed reading this, it also left me a bit disappointed and frustrated. I feel like this book just touched the surface of what this concept. I was expecting more tension, more suspense, and more dramatics, but that's not what happened. I'll start off by talking about the things I did like! The writing was one of them. I wasn't expecting to like it as much as I did, but I feel like it was perfect for this kind of book. It felt very hard (I know that's weird way to describe it) and straightforward. I felt like it complemented the technology and really highlighted the unknown, mysterious nature of the cube. I felt like the what the cube would be if it was a writing style. I know that's weird! I also liked the characters more than I thought I was going to. For me, when I read thrillers, I find I either like the plot and story or I liked that characters. I feel like it's hard to have both. While I didn't completely fall in love with them, I didn't hate them, which I'm counting as a win! All of them had their own distinct voice and their own personal struggles. Alright, I guess it's time to delve into the things I didn't love. The mystery surrounding the cube and where it ended up is one of the biggest ones. There were small parts that were creepy and I thought were wonderfully done. Small moments that sent chills up my spine and I think the overall concept is something fascinating and terrifying. But I don't get where it went. I felt like it was leading somewhere and then went nowhere. I don't get what the climax was supposed to be saying, I don't get where all the strings tie together, I don't get what everything was leading too. It just felt so disappointing. There were things that went nowhere and there were things that weren't explained enough. Big things too! Things big enough that I thought this was going to be a series instead of a standalone. Just, I felt like so much more could have been done and then it just wasn't. Maybe it completely went over my head, but I guess I wish it had ended differently. I also feel like this book was trying to send multiple messages, but they didn't quite fit? I didn't quite understand why they were included they way they were. Mostly because they didn't tie into the bigger picture a whole. They felt like they were just there, without any threads to connect them to the rest of the book. The way the POVs were spaced felt sort of off to me too. All four teens get a POV, but two of them don't get one until a good chunk of the way into the book. I was expecting something more uniform and it felt kind of all over the place. All in all, I didn't hate reading this book. It was interesting, even if it did have a disappointing ending. I can't say that I loved it, which I hate, but maybe you'll like it better than I did if you decide to give it a shot!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Kacey

    Thank you to NetGalley and the publishers for the free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. My opinion was not affected by the free copy. I'm wondering if the reason I didn't enjoy this book as much as I expected is because I'm older than the targeted audience. I'm thinking someone who is more immersed in social media will relate to this more, because I personally am not glued to my phone. But for me, another reason is because not a whole lot was happening in the first half or so o Thank you to NetGalley and the publishers for the free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. My opinion was not affected by the free copy. I'm wondering if the reason I didn't enjoy this book as much as I expected is because I'm older than the targeted audience. I'm thinking someone who is more immersed in social media will relate to this more, because I personally am not glued to my phone. But for me, another reason is because not a whole lot was happening in the first half or so of the book. Something that bugged me right away was that there were four protagonists, but only two got POV chapters for a good while. As a reader, that signaled to me that those two were more important somehow. Eventually the other two got POV chapters, but it didn't feel balanced since the first two got so much more focus right away. Another thing that bugged me was that Eden took the device seriously right away. Why? The text never explains. Which leads me to another problem: at least during the first half, readers don't get to see any consequences for the kids breaking the device's rules. One of the students doesn't care about the device and walks away from it. But does anything happen to them because of that? Nope. Even when the kids ask what could happen, all they get is a vague "consequences". It's like the author hadn't even thought up a punishment. For me, this made their actions to take the device seriously and follow its rules feel a little silly. Let me explain more by using the example of the horror movie "Truth or Dare". In that one a group of friends get tricked into playing a cursed version of the game. The rules there are pretty simple: you have to tell the truth or do the dare. Some of the kids break the rules and the consequences are they die. That motivates the remaining kids to take the game seriously. But here, at the halfway mark some of the kids broke the rules and nothing serious happened to them. So what's the motivation to take this seriously? Some of them do get curious about it, and yeah, human curiosity is a pretty powerful motivation, but why even threaten consequences if you won't follow through? On the upside, this book did illustrate how immersed some people can be in social media and technology. It showed just how much of our lives depend on technology these days, and how we can sink ourselves into it rather than experience the world outside. Those parts would be good for book discussion. I will also say that there were parts where the device felt unsettling. There were moments that felt like they were out of a Black Mirror episode. I guess I was hoping for the device to mess with the kids more, or to see actual consequences to breaking the rules. As it is, the book got pretty boring because it just felt like stuff happening with some brief spurts of unease. Maybe the second half is stronger, but honestly I wasn't interested enough to find out.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Seb

    Take Me With You is a sci-fi tinged thriller of four seemingly unrelated kids who get stuck basically babysitting a mysterious device. They can't figure out where it came from or for what reason and it gets increasingly threatening whenever the kids ask too many questions or make attempts to get rid of it. They're forced to befriend each other and work together while they try to figure out what's going on and how to stop it. I'm really sad to say that I didn't enjoy this one as much as I wanted Take Me With You is a sci-fi tinged thriller of four seemingly unrelated kids who get stuck basically babysitting a mysterious device. They can't figure out where it came from or for what reason and it gets increasingly threatening whenever the kids ask too many questions or make attempts to get rid of it. They're forced to befriend each other and work together while they try to figure out what's going on and how to stop it. I'm really sad to say that I didn't enjoy this one as much as I wanted to. The concept is really fun and interesting and I was excited to see where it went. There was a subplot early on about a racist classmate of theirs and white supremacists that were starting to terrorize their neighborhood. It seemed to me that the events were all related and I was hoping for a well thought out solution that tied things in to the way lingering white supremacy in this country has been brought to the public eye in recent years. Instead, this subplot was 'resolved' through a halfhearted apology from the xenophobic kid and one community rally. I was disappointed, I can't even pretend otherwise. It just felt like a lazy way to include racist and xenophobic issues of the day to be woke and relevant, without giving it the treatment it deserves. As for what was really behind the device, it was an entirely different thing that I won't get into details because of spoilers. What I will say is that it felt underdeveloped and rushed. The kids finding out what was really behind it and it being destroyed all happens in one short chapter, without very much build up. Sure, there's things here and there that might be counted as clues, but the clues are really more as to how they all get together, not what's behind the device and how. I wish more time had been put into it, so we could have had the resolution we deserved as readers, instead of rushing through it. I'm still giving it three stars, because I do think the concept was interesting and I enjoyed a lot of the characters. However, I wish the execution of the second half - or hell, even the final third!- of the book had been more thought out.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Kate Waggoner

    @KidLitExchange Thank you to @taraaltebrando and @bloomsburyya for sharing an advance copy of Take Me With You with the #kidlitexchange network. This YA sci-fi thriller will be out June 23, 2020. All opinions are my own. Four high school students from different backgrounds with seemingly nothing in common all receive a mysterious message to go to the music room after school. Once there they discover a strange black cube on a desk. The cube lights up giving them a series of instructions: "Do not @KidLitExchange Thank you to @taraaltebrando and @bloomsburyya for sharing an advance copy of Take Me With You with the #kidlitexchange network. This YA sci-fi thriller will be out June 23, 2020. All opinions are my own. Four high school students from different backgrounds with seemingly nothing in common all receive a mysterious message to go to the music room after school. Once there they discover a strange black cube on a desk. The cube lights up giving them a series of instructions: "Do not tell anyone about the device," "Do not leave the device unattended," and finally after the fire alarm blares, "Take me with you or else." Not sure what to do, they pick up the device and exit the building. This launches them into a "game" in which the device continues to give them more rules and when a rule is broken a consequence is given. The four aren't sure what to think at first, but follow the rules and directives out of fear and anxiety. As time goes on, it's clear that the device is invested in their personal lives and information but why is unclear. They also discover that not following the rules can have devastating results. I found this to be an interesting YA novel. The narrative was easy to get into. I liked that there was a diverse set of characters and that the novel takes on the topics of stereotypes, anxiety, grief, and racism. It really felt like the book was attempting to work up to a larger message about the dangers of technology and our ever-growing reliability upon technology, but ultimately I feel like this message never fully came to fruition. That being said, I still enjoyed the book and found that suspense was used well to build anticipation and keep me invested in the story. I also liked the subplots that focused on the secondary conflicts and themes. I would say that this book is appropriate for high school students and mature middle school students (I might require parental permission for my 7th graders). The publisher suggests ages 13+. It has some language, some violence, and discussion of sending inappropriate photos via text that some middle school parents may not be comfortable with.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Laura Petrie

    Thank you to the #kidlitexchange network for the review copy of this book. All opinions are my own.--- When I saw this book available for review, I knew I had to read it. I read The Leaving by Tara Altebrando, and I had been hooked, so I was looking for another suspenseful and intriguing read. Take Me With You by Tara Altebrando definitely delivered on that! This story follows four teenagers that share no connection except for the fact that they go to the same school. Eli, Eden, Marwan, and Ilan Thank you to the #kidlitexchange network for the review copy of this book. All opinions are my own.--- When I saw this book available for review, I knew I had to read it. I read The Leaving by Tara Altebrando, and I had been hooked, so I was looking for another suspenseful and intriguing read. Take Me With You by Tara Altebrando definitely delivered on that! This story follows four teenagers that share no connection except for the fact that they go to the same school. Eli, Eden, Marwan, and Ilanka each receive a message from their music teacher through an app telling them to meet in his room after school. The teacher is a no show, but a strange black cube sits on his desk. The cube instructs the 4 students not to tell anyone about it and to take it with them. More rules follow, and the cube continues to insert itself into their lives as it starts to grow more comfortable and feel like it belongs. Pretty soon, it’s presence grows from intriguing, to annoying, to menacing. I actually enjoyed this book more than Altebrando’s first novel because in this day and age, the premise is more believable. This story was eerie, and had me turning the pages to figure out what this cube would do next. The thing that made it so creepy is that it’s not far from what technology does for us today. I think this is a must read for all teens, especially those that are glued to their phones! It’s an important reminder of our digital footprint and lack of privacy. I appreciated that the story was told from four different perspectives, and Altebrando expertly ended each chapter to make you want to keep reading. Some chapters/perspectives were more engaging than others, but all of them came together to tell the story effectively. In the end, the characters come to realize technology’s impact on their lives, both positive and negative. I was left with some unanswered questions, but sometimes it’s fun to be left wondering. This book would be perfect for upper middle school and high school students that are fans of mystery, sci-fi stories, or those interested in technology and artificial intelligence.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Emma

    Before the school messaging app summons them all to an empty classroom after school, they barely know each other. Eden is struggling with anxiety while she grieves her father. Her mother tries to be there, be present, but Eden still feels alone with all of these fears and even scarier feelings. Marwan has two priorities: excelling enough in soccer to get a college scholarship and getting out of Queens. His immigrant parents don't understand either and would prefer Marwan channel his energy into wo Before the school messaging app summons them all to an empty classroom after school, they barely know each other. Eden is struggling with anxiety while she grieves her father. Her mother tries to be there, be present, but Eden still feels alone with all of these fears and even scarier feelings. Marwan has two priorities: excelling enough in soccer to get a college scholarship and getting out of Queens. His immigrant parents don't understand either and would prefer Marwan channel his energy into working at the family's Persian restaurant that he will one day inherit. Eli loves all things tech and gaming. But it's hard to focus on either while his grandfather is dying a slow death in a nursing home and Eli feels like even more of an afterthought in his own family. Ilanka has always prided herself on keeping other people at a distance--the better to plan an exit strategy from her claustrophobic family, the rhythmic gymnastics she isn't sure she cares about, and ignore the fact that her "best" friend isn't much of a friend at all. None of them know why they're summoned to the classroom. They don't even notice the device at first. Until it lights up and starts telling them the rules: Don't tell anyone about the device. Never leave the device unattended. No one leaves. Later, there will be other rules, a few mistakes, and a lot of questions but first they're told to take the device with them. Brought together by a mysterious device Eden, Marwan, Eli, and Ilanka will have to work together to uncover answers or suffer the consequences in Take Me With You (2020) by Tara Altebrando. Find it on Bookshop. Altebrando's latest standalone thriller is a dynamo alternating between multiple points of view with tension you can cut with a knife. This character-driven thriller has an intense plot situated perfectly between suspense and speculative fiction. At the same time, while answering questions about the device motivates all four characters, the story's ultimate focus is on the unlikely connection formed between themin the most unlikely of circumstances. Take Me With You is a tense, thoughtful thriller with a perfectly executed denouement; the eerily possibly thriller you've been waiting for. Highly recommended. Possible Pairings: The Smell of Other People's Houses by Bonnie Sue Hitchcock, Infinite in Between by Carolyn Mackler, One of Us Is Lying by Karen M. McManus, All Our Twisted Secrets by Diana Urban, Places No One Knows by Brenna Yovanoff *An advance copy of this title was provided by the publisher for review consideration*

  22. 4 out of 5

    BrittsBookClub

    I really liked the sound of this book from the synopsis and thought it was going to be something I really enjoyed. It turned out to be an overage book for me. Nothing spectacular, but nothing totally terrible either. I think there were definitely places it was lacking, but it was an entertaining read that I got through fairly quickly. The Story: I liked the sound of the story, but once I started reading it, I realized it was the young adult version of Danny Tobey’s The God Game. And, since The G I really liked the sound of this book from the synopsis and thought it was going to be something I really enjoyed. It turned out to be an overage book for me. Nothing spectacular, but nothing totally terrible either. I think there were definitely places it was lacking, but it was an entertaining read that I got through fairly quickly. The Story: I liked the sound of the story, but once I started reading it, I realized it was the young adult version of Danny Tobey’s The God Game. And, since The God Game was one of my favorite books, it fell a little flat. I think there was a lot left to be desired and there were so many areas where the book could have gotten a lot more twisted and suspenseful. I like books that make me question what I would do in that situation, but I just didn’t find myself asking that during this one. I wouldn’t say this was boring at all, just a watered down version of what could have been a very deranged and entertaining story. The Characters: The characters in the novel were okay. I never felt myself personally connecting to them and while we got descriptions about their race and looks, I really never felt like we got into their personalities all that much. They didn’t seem completely unique from one another. I also think there could have been a lot more character development for our main characters throughout the novel, especially with a story like this. The Writing: The writing was told from the four main characters perspectives. It followed a chronological order and didn’t jump around. I think the writing was a little simplistic and lacked some descriptions that could have been useful in setting scenarios. Overall, this wasn’t my favorite book, but I did enjoy it and read it within a couple of days. It definitely had a science-fiction and thriller mix to it, so if that’s something you’re into, you can give it a shot and see what you think!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Sarah (Unqualified Reader)

    I received a free copy of this book via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review 3.5 out of 5 stars I was really anticipating this book after reading the author's other book "The Leaving." I went into this book with really high hopes. Some of those hopes were met, others were not. I will start out by saying this was a good book overall, and I do recommend reading it if you are into young adult sci-fi/thrillers. The writing style of this book really worked for me, and for the story. It was really I received a free copy of this book via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review 3.5 out of 5 stars I was really anticipating this book after reading the author's other book "The Leaving." I went into this book with really high hopes. Some of those hopes were met, others were not. I will start out by saying this was a good book overall, and I do recommend reading it if you are into young adult sci-fi/thrillers. The writing style of this book really worked for me, and for the story. It was really easy to read and interpret which is really important when talking about artificial intelligence (AI). AI is a really complex topic, and being able to read it in an understandable way helped because I am not a tech savvy person. The sentences were short, and kind of choppy which I believe was done on purpose to make it seem more robotic. Because the sentences were short and easy to read, I think it made it very fast paced and helped the story to pick up right away. The story is told from four different perspectives. We hear from Emma, Marwan, Eli, and Ilanka. I do think the characters were rather one dimensional/stereotypical. While each character had different personality traits, they also each had one specific problem they were facing (other than the device). The problems they faced were relatable, and did help me connect to the characters better. They really grew on me. I did like all four characters despite them not being very multifaceted. This book is definitely creepy, and thrilling. As a society we are not far from the technology displayed in the book. This really gave the book the benefit of feeling more real. While I do have some other things to say about this book, I will refrain because I don't want to give spoilers. Like I mentioned before this is worth the read, and I will be looking forward to Tara Altebrando's next novel!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Erika Reynolds

    This thriller tells the story of four high schoolers with seemingly no connection who get brought together one day by an AI device. The device, which goes by the name Aziel, gives the teens very specific rules to follow with the threat of “or else” if they don’t comply. Eden, Eli, Marwan, and Ilanka all have their own personal issues to work through while also trying to solve the mystery of where the device came from and what its purpose is, which leads to lapses in judgments and some devastatin This thriller tells the story of four high schoolers with seemingly no connection who get brought together one day by an AI device. The device, which goes by the name Aziel, gives the teens very specific rules to follow with the threat of “or else” if they don’t comply. Eden, Eli, Marwan, and Ilanka all have their own personal issues to work through while also trying to solve the mystery of where the device came from and what its purpose is, which leads to lapses in judgments and some devastating consequences. My actual rating for this book is 3.5. It’s a high-interest, quick YA read. I love the diversity in this book. All four characters come from different cultural backgrounds, and Altebrando does a nice job of allowing the characters to wrestle with real-life issues that enhance the characters and subplots without sidetracking from the AI plot. What I didn’t like is how neatly the subplots wrap up. They are not at all realistic, especially Marwan’s, and I think Altebrando missed some significant learning opportunities. Overall, this is an extremely relevant story in today’s society. For a thriller, it kept me on my toes. I didn’t have a clue where the device came from or why it targeted those four students, and honestly I’m still not completely sure. The ending gets pretty tech savvy and that’s not my forte at all, but I still enjoyed the story. I imagine many teens would have a better understanding, and that is definitely the target audience. Thank you to Net Galley, Tara Altebrando, and Bloomsbury for this ARC in exchange for my honest review.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Kendra Ivery

    Four students Eden, Marwan, Eli, and Ilanka who are seemingly unconnected are summoned to the band room one afternoon. Waiting for them is a mysterious cube that comes with a set of strange instructions. On top of following the strange demands of the device, each teen is dealing with difficult situations in their personal lives. I was generally intrigued by the premise of this book. In today’s society, we are all engrossed by technology and social media. This book explores what happens when tech Four students Eden, Marwan, Eli, and Ilanka who are seemingly unconnected are summoned to the band room one afternoon. Waiting for them is a mysterious cube that comes with a set of strange instructions. On top of following the strange demands of the device, each teen is dealing with difficult situations in their personal lives. I was generally intrigued by the premise of this book. In today’s society, we are all engrossed by technology and social media. This book explores what happens when technology becomes engrossed in us. I also liked that the ‘thriller’ aspect of this book did not take place in a vacuum as some others tend to do. All of the characters were dealing with real issues in their home lives that made dealing with the mysterious cube more complex. With that being said, I think that this book does not completely fit the thriller genre. The chapters were short which made the book feel fast-paced but I never felt that “edge of your seat” feeling. The mystery, if you can call it that, surrounding the cube felt more like a Sci-Fi novel than a mystery/thriller. In fact, the mystery surrounding the cube had a lackluster resolution that left me feeling disappointed and unsatisfied. Over-all, this book felt like a middle of the road YA-Thriller but a pretty decent YA Sci-Fi novel.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Teri

    This is my third book by this author, and I've enjoyed every one of them. Several reviewers mentioned they were under the impression this was more of a mystery/thriller, but it's absolutely a sci-fi/thriller - totally my kind of book.  I flew through it in two days.  These four, very relatable teen characters have distinctive personalities, and each is coping with their own complicated problems.  They come from diverse backgrounds and situations, so why they're thrown together is a mystery to the This is my third book by this author, and I've enjoyed every one of them. Several reviewers mentioned they were under the impression this was more of a mystery/thriller, but it's absolutely a sci-fi/thriller - totally my kind of book.  I flew through it in two days.  These four, very relatable teen characters have distinctive personalities, and each is coping with their own complicated problems.  They come from diverse backgrounds and situations, so why they're thrown together is a mystery to them.  The way they learn in such a short time to depend on each other and offer support was a strong point for me.     And the device!  It's multi-faceted, and over the course of the story is mysterious, helpful, intrusive, and insidious.  I can't say much more without giving away spoilers, but my need to know what was going on made it a struggle to close this book.  Although the reveal is satisfying and even jarring, I did feel as if the problems the characters faced in their personal lives were wrapped up with a pretty large bow at the end, but I seem to be in the minority on that opinion. This is a completely engaging read with unnerving sci-fi aspects and one I recommend.  I'll be looking for more books by this author in the future. I received a complimentary copy of this book from the publisher through NetGalley.  Opinions expressed in this review are completely my own.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Kasey Giard

    You know you’re in for a wild ride when an author creates a simple black cube and makes it creepy as all get out. I had no idea what I was in for when I started TAKE ME WITH YOU. As soon as Eden took the cube, I knew I was hooked. I sneaked in a few pages between things I had to get done. Anytime I had a couple minutes, I was right back in the pages of the book. Eden and Marwan are my favorites. I loved the fact that we got to see what they were each thinking about each other but not brave enough You know you’re in for a wild ride when an author creates a simple black cube and makes it creepy as all get out. I had no idea what I was in for when I started TAKE ME WITH YOU. As soon as Eden took the cube, I knew I was hooked. I sneaked in a few pages between things I had to get done. Anytime I had a couple minutes, I was right back in the pages of the book. Eden and Marwan are my favorites. I loved the fact that we got to see what they were each thinking about each other but not brave enough to say. And I loved that even though the cube opened up a nightmare for all the people involved, it also forced people who were isolated in different ways to take risks and form friendships. That part was really cool. I think I stayed on the edge of my seat with this book all the way until the end. It’s definitely the kind of book where you just want there to be another chapter that really, finally, explicitly says what you’ve hoped will happen. But all the possibilities are there, and there’s something really sweet in leaving the story with that kind of open doorway to something great. I really enjoyed TAKE ME WITH YOU. I’m not usually a big suspense reader, but I definitely enjoyed this book a lot. I think fans of WE DIDN’T ASK FOR THIS by Adi Alsaid or THIS IS WHERE IT ENDS by Marieke Nijkamp will like this book.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Mrs. Kenyon

    Eden, Eli, Ilanka, and Marwan all receive a notification from a teacher to meet in a classroom after school. They all arrive, yet there is no teacher … just a small cube resting on the desk. They aren’t sure what they should do or why they were called to this classroom, but then the cube lights up and gives them some rules: they aren’t to tell anyone about the device, they should never leave the device unattended and they need to take the cube with them. They don’t know if this is a prank or som Eden, Eli, Ilanka, and Marwan all receive a notification from a teacher to meet in a classroom after school. They all arrive, yet there is no teacher … just a small cube resting on the desk. They aren’t sure what they should do or why they were called to this classroom, but then the cube lights up and gives them some rules: they aren’t to tell anyone about the device, they should never leave the device unattended and they need to take the cube with them. They don’t know if this is a prank or some sort of experiment, but they follow the rules … or at least try to. The cube keeps adding new rules that make the group interactions even more complicated. What is this cube and what will it eventually expect from these teens? Take Me with You is a stand-alone novel that is part thriller, part science fiction, and part coming of age story. Just like the cube doesn’t fit neatly in these teens' preconceived ideas, this novel doesn’t fit any one genre either. Altebrando has created a story with so much potential, yet it just falls flat. The ending was anticlimactic and I lost interest about halfway through. It wasn’t a long read, so I don’t feel like it was a waste of time, but it isn’t a book I can strongly recommend to everyone. A fun read, just not a great read.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Chelsea

    Thanks to NetGalley for allowing me to read this book in exchange for my honest review. This was unlike any other book I’ve read before. 4 high school students are called to the music room after school. They don’t know each other well, and they don’t know why they’re there. No one is in the room - just a black cube that begins flashing messages like “nobody leaves” and “take me with you...or else.” What is it? And what are the consequences if they don’t follow its rules? I really enjoyed the premi Thanks to NetGalley for allowing me to read this book in exchange for my honest review. This was unlike any other book I’ve read before. 4 high school students are called to the music room after school. They don’t know each other well, and they don’t know why they’re there. No one is in the room - just a black cube that begins flashing messages like “nobody leaves” and “take me with you...or else.” What is it? And what are the consequences if they don’t follow its rules? I really enjoyed the premise of the book. I found it very intriguing, and I was really into the first 3/4 of the book. The end, however, was disappointing. I wanted the device to be creepier/scarier than it was - it started off pretty promising but then didn’t really follow through on its consequences. I didn’t fully understand the goal of this book - there seemed to be a larger message intended that didn’t fully click for me. It could have been great, but it was only good. That being said, the writing was good, the characters were strong, and the premise was great at first, so I’ll still give it 4 stars.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Lindsay

    I didn't like this one as much as Tara's other books. There was too much going on to really stress the importance of the main event: the mysterious device. These characters spent lots of time discussing and thinking about their problems/activities which took away the importance of the device. Eden pondered over Julian and Marwan. Marwan worked at his family's restaurant and played soccer. Eli played Sims. Ilanka didn't really do anything. I felt like the time these characters spent doing unimpor I didn't like this one as much as Tara's other books. There was too much going on to really stress the importance of the main event: the mysterious device. These characters spent lots of time discussing and thinking about their problems/activities which took away the importance of the device. Eden pondered over Julian and Marwan. Marwan worked at his family's restaurant and played soccer. Eli played Sims. Ilanka didn't really do anything. I felt like the time these characters spent doing unimportant activities could have been structured differently to focus on the device. The ending was a letdown since the readers don't receive an answer to all questions, and that's all I can really say to avoid dipping into spoilers. The writing style was also one I wasn't fond of. Paragraphs and sentences were jarringly placed and unnecessary description was used to describe the stores lining the streets of New York City when the characters walked around. If this had been written a little differently, I would have enjoyed it more. Thank you NetGalley for an ARC.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.