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A Radical Guide for Women with ADHD: Embrace Neurodiversity, Live Boldly, and Break Through Barriers

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Live boldly as a woman with ADHD! This radical guide will show you how to cultivate your individual strengths, honor your neurodiversity, and learn to communicate with confidence and clarity. If you are a woman with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), you’ve probably known—all your life—that you’re different. As girls, we learn which behaviors, thinking, learni Live boldly as a woman with ADHD! This radical guide will show you how to cultivate your individual strengths, honor your neurodiversity, and learn to communicate with confidence and clarity. If you are a woman with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), you’ve probably known—all your life—that you’re different. As girls, we learn which behaviors, thinking, learning, and working styles are preferred, which are accepted and tolerated, and which are frowned upon. These preferences are communicated in innumerable ways—from media and books to our first-grade classroom to conversations with our classmates and parents. Over the course of a lifetime, women with ADHD learn through various channels that the way they think, work, speak, relate, and act does not match up with the preferred way of being in the world. In short, they learn that difference is bad. And, since these women know that they are different, they learn that they are bad. It’s time for a change. A Radical Guide for Women with ADHD is the first guided workbook for women with ADHD designed to break the cycle of negative self-talk and shame-based narratives that stem from the common and limiting belief that brain differences are character flaws. In this unique guide, you’ll find a groundbreaking approach that blends traditional ADHD treatment with contemporary treatment methods, such as acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT), to help you untangle yourself from the beliefs that have kept you from reaching your potential in life. If you’re ready to develop a strong, bold, and confident sense of self, embrace your unique brain-based differences, and cultivate your individual strengths, this step-by-step workbook will help guide the way.


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Live boldly as a woman with ADHD! This radical guide will show you how to cultivate your individual strengths, honor your neurodiversity, and learn to communicate with confidence and clarity. If you are a woman with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), you’ve probably known—all your life—that you’re different. As girls, we learn which behaviors, thinking, learni Live boldly as a woman with ADHD! This radical guide will show you how to cultivate your individual strengths, honor your neurodiversity, and learn to communicate with confidence and clarity. If you are a woman with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), you’ve probably known—all your life—that you’re different. As girls, we learn which behaviors, thinking, learning, and working styles are preferred, which are accepted and tolerated, and which are frowned upon. These preferences are communicated in innumerable ways—from media and books to our first-grade classroom to conversations with our classmates and parents. Over the course of a lifetime, women with ADHD learn through various channels that the way they think, work, speak, relate, and act does not match up with the preferred way of being in the world. In short, they learn that difference is bad. And, since these women know that they are different, they learn that they are bad. It’s time for a change. A Radical Guide for Women with ADHD is the first guided workbook for women with ADHD designed to break the cycle of negative self-talk and shame-based narratives that stem from the common and limiting belief that brain differences are character flaws. In this unique guide, you’ll find a groundbreaking approach that blends traditional ADHD treatment with contemporary treatment methods, such as acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT), to help you untangle yourself from the beliefs that have kept you from reaching your potential in life. If you’re ready to develop a strong, bold, and confident sense of self, embrace your unique brain-based differences, and cultivate your individual strengths, this step-by-step workbook will help guide the way.

30 review for A Radical Guide for Women with ADHD: Embrace Neurodiversity, Live Boldly, and Break Through Barriers

  1. 4 out of 5

    Tanya Harding

    I have many thoughts about this book. So many that I don’t know what order to put them in and feel overwhelmed and am concerned that I’ll come off as a total jerk. Oh well. To start, here are some feelings: disappointment, bewilderment, alienation and frustration. Please excuse all my grammatical and spelling errors. I've given myself a time limit. I’ll share an experience that informed my opinion of this book. Way back in the late 90s when I was in college my girlfriend (also ADD) and I read a b I have many thoughts about this book. So many that I don’t know what order to put them in and feel overwhelmed and am concerned that I’ll come off as a total jerk. Oh well. To start, here are some feelings: disappointment, bewilderment, alienation and frustration. Please excuse all my grammatical and spelling errors. I've given myself a time limit. I’ll share an experience that informed my opinion of this book. Way back in the late 90s when I was in college my girlfriend (also ADD) and I read a book together about women and ADHD. I don’t recall the name of the book, but we used to read certain lines and laugh about how “straight” the book was. The women seemed to all live in the suburbs and were white and were not just heterosexual, but had heterormative relationships and families. The ADHD self improvement world depicted seemed regressive in it’s grief about not living up to highly restrictive feminine ideals, kinda like June Cleaver. We understood that this book was not really meant for us, but for a certain type of woman with ADHD. It was for wives and mothers and caretakers. Although I identified as a woman, I still felt alienated by this book. Fast forward twenty years. I’m in the throws of perimenopause and having lots of “bad brain days” and my stimulant medication doesn’t seem to work well. I’m also in therapy and learning that I’m not good at establishing boundaries in my intimate relationships. It seemed like a good time to dive back into ADHD research, strategies and the more emotional/relational work involved with the diagnosis, especially for women. And then I found this book. Reading this book was like traveling back in time. I had the same reaction I did twenty years ago. Here are some things that bewilder me about this book: This book says that women with ADHD don’t “necessarily choose to act in nontraditional ways- we simply don’t have a chioce.” Although the book never specifies what these traditional gender roles are, it doesn’t seem to question that these very roles themselves may be sexist, racist, and ablest in and of themselves. Furthermore, many people do indeed choose not to conform to these gender ideals in all sorts of ways….and some of them also have ADHD. I would have appreciated an elaboration on why the authors used the term “invisible differences,” and not “invisible disability.” Understanding and embracing disability, especially invisible disability, is empowering and helps me assert my rights and connects me to other people with shared experiences. Most importantly, it makes me question normalcy and privilege. The book seems to distance itself from the term and I just can’t imagine why. As I read the stories in the book, I was struck that all these women seemed to be on this journey alone, and at times, even isolated. I don’t understand why they weren’t connecting with other ADHD folks. This seems bizarre to me. Have they never met another person with ADHD? Do they not have access to social media or ADHD groups? Is there no desire to meet other members of “the tribe”? Is ADHD community and connection not an important part of shining brighter and being our authentic selves? This book would be more helpful if it was reworked as an autobiography, or as a chapter about ACT therapy in a larger book about ADHD. It’s greatest flaw, IMO, is including women in the title. This is not a book about women with ADHD. You can’t overgeneralize about women and not talk about race and class and sexual orientation and disability and gender identity and gender expression. Trans women are women. Full stop. You don’t get to be the “normal women” that everyone else is defined against. All this does is assert your privilege. And it’s not enough to just add a paragraph or two saying that those “other” women with ADHD have an ever harder time.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Sharon Saline

    In this terrific book, Sari Solden and Michelle Frank offer extremely useful tips and tools for how women with ADHD can transform negative messages, shame and fear and live confident, authentic and courageous lives. Packed with helpful discovery and reflection exercises and stories from real women, including themselves, this book puts forth a positive perspective that will assist readers in accepting their brains--and themselves--with more compassion and insight. Succinct take-aways at the end o In this terrific book, Sari Solden and Michelle Frank offer extremely useful tips and tools for how women with ADHD can transform negative messages, shame and fear and live confident, authentic and courageous lives. Packed with helpful discovery and reflection exercises and stories from real women, including themselves, this book puts forth a positive perspective that will assist readers in accepting their brains--and themselves--with more compassion and insight. Succinct take-aways at the end of each chapter synthesize key points and ideas for improving communication and self-regulation skills are presented throughout. I’m planning to recommend and use this book immediately with my clients!

  3. 4 out of 5

    BookwormishMe

    Generally I do not enjoy reading self-help books. This one grabbed my attention, because as someone with ADHD, and the parent of someone with ADHD, I wondered what new info or help could be gained. I was instantly surprised with how much resonated with me. Topics that I never considered to be ADHD related were suddenly revealed to me. A Radical Guide for Women with ADHD walks you through the process of confronting uncomfortable facts of living with ADHD. ADHD is not all about not being able to s Generally I do not enjoy reading self-help books. This one grabbed my attention, because as someone with ADHD, and the parent of someone with ADHD, I wondered what new info or help could be gained. I was instantly surprised with how much resonated with me. Topics that I never considered to be ADHD related were suddenly revealed to me. A Radical Guide for Women with ADHD walks you through the process of confronting uncomfortable facts of living with ADHD. ADHD is not all about not being able to sit still, or pay attention properly, or get things done. ADHD has so many other facets that leak into our everyday lives. Feelings of unworthiness or shame at how we live cause us to be one person on the inside and quite another on the outside. Without confronting these differences and accepting our challenges, we hide who we really are from the rest of the world. This guide asks you to face those challenges of ADHD and accept that while we are different, different doesn’t mean bad or worthless or less than. Our ADHD traits may actually benefit us in many ways. Solden and Frank give us lessons from their own experiences as well as others. Each chapter addresses something that is common amongst women with ADHD, though we each may manifest it differently. The chapters ask questions. Questions that make you think about what it might be that you are locking away or avoiding because of your ADHD. It is a new and radical way of approaching ADHD. “Women hide not from judgement itself but from the anticipation of pain, disappointment, and disconnection. While it seems that acts of hiding protect us from such discomfort and pain, these protective behaviors exact a large price as we diminish our own light. Instead of blocking and protecting, hiding actually keeps us farther away from what we long for.” This particular passage resonated with me. This is only one of the many passages that will resonate with women who live every day with their ADHD. If you are one of those women, or living with one, I highly recommend this book. It has changed me (baby steps) for the better. I will continue to use it as a workbook to try to gain more acceptance of my differences in my every day life. I can’t recommend this book enough. This review will be posted at BookwormishMe.com close to publication date.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    I received an ARC from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Conceivably, I am the ideal audience for this book. I'm a woman who was just diagnosed with ADHD and I'm trying to figure out what it all means. But this just wasn't the book I needed at the moment-- for me, I've had so many years of coping mechanisms combined with a type A personality that starting Ritalin gave me just enough help to start moving forward. Maybe this will be something I turn back to when I've had more time to sit I received an ARC from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Conceivably, I am the ideal audience for this book. I'm a woman who was just diagnosed with ADHD and I'm trying to figure out what it all means. But this just wasn't the book I needed at the moment-- for me, I've had so many years of coping mechanisms combined with a type A personality that starting Ritalin gave me just enough help to start moving forward. Maybe this will be something I turn back to when I've had more time to sit with the diagnosis and how it's affected my life and behavior, but at this point, it's not what I needed.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    As a therapist who works with (and has) ADHD, I am so grateful for this book! It touches on the emotional roadblocks that impact our lives with ADHD, and builds skills around mindfulness and self-compassion. As another reviewer mentioned, this book may not be the best for folks who were very recently diagnosed with ADHD. There are other books that do a great job of explaining the latest research on ADHD and provide a basic overview of the diagnosis. There are also numerous ADHD books that focus As a therapist who works with (and has) ADHD, I am so grateful for this book! It touches on the emotional roadblocks that impact our lives with ADHD, and builds skills around mindfulness and self-compassion. As another reviewer mentioned, this book may not be the best for folks who were very recently diagnosed with ADHD. There are other books that do a great job of explaining the latest research on ADHD and provide a basic overview of the diagnosis. There are also numerous ADHD books that focus on specific skills and strategies for organizing, productivity, time management, etc. Learning skills to manage ADHD is really important, but at the end of the day you’re still going to have ADHD. There can be so much frustration with feeling like you’re using all of the coaching techniques and still falling short of expectations. This workbook creates space to explore where those expectations come from, and what would happen if you focus a bit more on self-acceptance than on change. One final note: I appreciate that co-author Michelle Frank has spoken in interviews about this book being labeled “For Women” for a variety of reasons, and wanting the material to be accessible & inclusive across the gender spectrum (and specifically for trans & gender non-binary folks).

  6. 5 out of 5

    Katherine

    Just a delight. Much of this would be relevant to all women, I think. All about embracing what makes you unique and taking up space in the world. Nicely focused, so it’s not rehashing the same ADHD info covered everywhere else, but as such, it’s probably best as a companion to a more general overview (if your diagnosis is new).

  7. 4 out of 5

    Алёна Брайловская

    I was looking for a book explaining how symptoms of ADD could be different for women, and also for some practical guide on living with it. But instead I got some support group manual with a lot of ‘you need to overcome your fear’, ‘find your voice’ and ‘embrace your creativity’ messages. Probably I’m just not a target audience for it. It’s supposed to be empowering, and client stories — to be relatable. But as for me it looked like the narrator’s voice is pityful and they feel really sorry for yo I was looking for a book explaining how symptoms of ADD could be different for women, and also for some practical guide on living with it. But instead I got some support group manual with a lot of ‘you need to overcome your fear’, ‘find your voice’ and ‘embrace your creativity’ messages. Probably I’m just not a target audience for it. It’s supposed to be empowering, and client stories — to be relatable. But as for me it looked like the narrator’s voice is pityful and they feel really sorry for you and want to guide you. Like you are some little helpless creature not being able to stand for yourself. Also most of the life examples are coming from some sweet suburban life where woman as a wife is supposed to manage the house and to host family dinners, and is having difficulties with that due to ADHD but is afraid to ask to support. As for me, the main problem here is the most these clients would need therapy even without ADHD. And you probably should ask for help doing your chores not just because you are struggling with ADHD but because you are not actually obligated to fulfill your gender expectations and to manage all the family stuff alone as a wife. Overall seemed like the only existing type of ADHD in women is shy and quiet one, and that’s the only type this book speaks for.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Terry ~ Huntress of Erudition

    This book appealed to me because I always thought I had a touch of ADHD, but am basically functioning without professional treatment. The main theme of this book is to accept yourself exactly as you are, as a way of controlling ADHD, along with any meds you may be taking - you don't need to "fix" yourself, . The book encourages the reader to follow their internal compass and use "mindful authenticity" to work around your issues and have more control over things that distract you & trigger your em This book appealed to me because I always thought I had a touch of ADHD, but am basically functioning without professional treatment. The main theme of this book is to accept yourself exactly as you are, as a way of controlling ADHD, along with any meds you may be taking - you don't need to "fix" yourself, . The book encourages the reader to follow their internal compass and use "mindful authenticity" to work around your issues and have more control over things that distract you & trigger your emotions, which cause undesirable coping mechanisms like impulsiveness, over-thinking minor decisions, avoiding cleaning up, leaving unfinished projects and clutter wherever you go. I would recommend the simple and positive approach this book has, which makes it acessible to many people. It does not downplay professional help, but shows what an individual can do to help themselves to achieve the life they deserve.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Lily Lila

    Forget $250/session ADHD counseling - all you need is this book! I rarely write reviews but this is a game-changer for any woman (or really anybody) struggling with ADHD. I have read every self help book for ADHD out there and have never really connected with the solutions they offer or ideas they discuss - but this one is different. It dives in deep to the psychological underlying reasons why you experience shame and difficulty coping (in a way that kind of blew my mind). Then it has exercises Forget $250/session ADHD counseling - all you need is this book! I rarely write reviews but this is a game-changer for any woman (or really anybody) struggling with ADHD. I have read every self help book for ADHD out there and have never really connected with the solutions they offer or ideas they discuss - but this one is different. It dives in deep to the psychological underlying reasons why you experience shame and difficulty coping (in a way that kind of blew my mind). Then it has exercises to help you address those feelings and your history with them in order to move towards positive acceptance. It honestly felt more like a therapy session more than a self help book! Could not recommend this book more to anybody who is struggling. However, I will say that I don't think this book is for people who are newly diagnosed. So much of it requires that you reflect on your history of relationship with ADHD that I doubt it would be very helpful if you're still in the first stages of "grief" after a diagnosis - this book is more for people who have been stuck in shame and fear for several years and would like to move on to "radical acceptance."

  10. 5 out of 5

    Susan Hunsberger

    Embrace Neurodiversity This is a wonderful explanation of the unique challenges faced by women with ADHD.  The writing is thoughtful and reflective and encourages the same of its readers.  Sari and Michelle do this by including well-placed invitations to pause and think about one’s own experience by including questions and sample statements that help the readers dive deep into their experiences.  The included stories add another layer of connection and understanding.   Thank you, Michelle and Sari Embrace Neurodiversity This is a wonderful explanation of the unique challenges faced by women with ADHD.  The writing is thoughtful and reflective and encourages the same of its readers.  Sari and Michelle do this by including well-placed invitations to pause and think about one’s own experience by including questions and sample statements that help the readers dive deep into their experiences.  The included stories add another layer of connection and understanding.   Thank you, Michelle and Sari, for sharing your experiences, valuing your clients, and helping us each learn to appreciate our own brains. I’m thrilled to have this book to recommend to my clients and I am confident that my reading of this guide will help me be a better professional organizer in my work with clients with ADHD, chronic disorganization, and all others who find their brains to be interesting. Susan Hunsberger

  11. 4 out of 5

    Rashida

    Finally a book that touches on the impact of living with ADHD and the mental and emotional fallout. We're already aware of say the clutter, forgetfulness, lack of attention etc, but this is the first book I've read that gets to the heart of ADHD from a basic human perspective and how we can navigate those emotions. I'll be recommending this book for a lot time to come! This conversation needs to go mainstream. Thank you Sari for this book.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Katie

    I have always thought I was the only one struggling to find my way. I have read so many of the testimonials of women who parrot my own thoughts with such accuracy that I cried. I was isolated in my understanding that I am different but now I realize my tribes out there, waiting for me to accept myself. I borrowed this book from my library but plan to buy it so I can remind myself that I’m not as alone as I feel sometimes.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Katherine Ellison

    I love Sari Solden's voice. Women with ADHD, like me, need a ton of encouragement and most of all a feeling that we're not alone, and she, and this book provide that. If you've just been diagnosed, in particular, it's a helpful guide to understanding this often-perplexing diagnosis and easing up on yourself for all those things you do that seem to drive other people crazy -- but also learning strategies to take a little more control. Brava!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Gaby F.

    This book helps women to gain a new perspective on living with ADHD. The prescription lays in accepting and embracing the condition with all its problems, instead of giving up or engaging in a never ending battle. Women should use all the resources available to cope with ADHD and this book is a good stepping stone to find the necessary resources.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    This book was very "light" and formatted like a workbook. It offered minimal insight or concrete advise that was relevant to me and my experience.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Mo Tracey

  17. 4 out of 5

    Lyndsey prince

  18. 5 out of 5

    Ilse

  19. 4 out of 5

    Caitlin June

  20. 4 out of 5

    Noëlle

  21. 5 out of 5

    Gabrielle Gauthier

  22. 4 out of 5

    Nicole Parsley

  23. 5 out of 5

    Mia

  24. 5 out of 5

    Maria

  25. 4 out of 5

    Skylar

  26. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

  27. 4 out of 5

    Maria

  28. 5 out of 5

    Gisèle

  29. 4 out of 5

    James Ochoa

  30. 5 out of 5

    Carolyn Lewis

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