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An unexpected offer threatens the bond between Qui-Gon Jinn and Obi-Wan Kenobi as the two Jedi navigate a dangerous new planet and an uncertain future. A Jedi must be a fearless warrior, a guardian of justice, and a scholar in the ways of the Force. But perhaps a Jedi’s most essential duty is to pass on what they have learned. Master Yoda trained Dooku; Dooku trained Qui-Go An unexpected offer threatens the bond between Qui-Gon Jinn and Obi-Wan Kenobi as the two Jedi navigate a dangerous new planet and an uncertain future. A Jedi must be a fearless warrior, a guardian of justice, and a scholar in the ways of the Force. But perhaps a Jedi’s most essential duty is to pass on what they have learned. Master Yoda trained Dooku; Dooku trained Qui-Gon Jinn; and now Qui-Gon has a Padawan of his own. But while Qui-Gon has faced all manner of threats and danger as a Jedi, nothing has ever scared him like the thought of failing his apprentice. Obi-Wan Kenobi has deep respect for his Master, but struggles to understand him. Why must Qui-Gon so often disregard the laws that bind the Jedi? Why is Qui-Gon drawn to ancient Jedi prophecies instead of more practical concerns? And why wasn’t Obi-Wan told that Qui-Gon is considering an invitation to join the Jedi Council—knowing it would mean the end of their partnership? The simple answer scares him: Obi-Wan has failed his Master. When Jedi Rael Averross, another former student of Dooku, requests their assistance with a political dispute, Jinn and Kenobi travel to the royal court of Pijal for what may be their final mission together. What should be a simple assignment quickly becomes clouded by deceit, and by visions of violent disaster that take hold in Qui-Gon’s mind. As Qui-Gon’s faith in prophecy grows, Obi-Wan’s faith in him is tested—just as a threat surfaces that will demand that Master and apprentice come together as never before, or be divided forever.


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An unexpected offer threatens the bond between Qui-Gon Jinn and Obi-Wan Kenobi as the two Jedi navigate a dangerous new planet and an uncertain future. A Jedi must be a fearless warrior, a guardian of justice, and a scholar in the ways of the Force. But perhaps a Jedi’s most essential duty is to pass on what they have learned. Master Yoda trained Dooku; Dooku trained Qui-Go An unexpected offer threatens the bond between Qui-Gon Jinn and Obi-Wan Kenobi as the two Jedi navigate a dangerous new planet and an uncertain future. A Jedi must be a fearless warrior, a guardian of justice, and a scholar in the ways of the Force. But perhaps a Jedi’s most essential duty is to pass on what they have learned. Master Yoda trained Dooku; Dooku trained Qui-Gon Jinn; and now Qui-Gon has a Padawan of his own. But while Qui-Gon has faced all manner of threats and danger as a Jedi, nothing has ever scared him like the thought of failing his apprentice. Obi-Wan Kenobi has deep respect for his Master, but struggles to understand him. Why must Qui-Gon so often disregard the laws that bind the Jedi? Why is Qui-Gon drawn to ancient Jedi prophecies instead of more practical concerns? And why wasn’t Obi-Wan told that Qui-Gon is considering an invitation to join the Jedi Council—knowing it would mean the end of their partnership? The simple answer scares him: Obi-Wan has failed his Master. When Jedi Rael Averross, another former student of Dooku, requests their assistance with a political dispute, Jinn and Kenobi travel to the royal court of Pijal for what may be their final mission together. What should be a simple assignment quickly becomes clouded by deceit, and by visions of violent disaster that take hold in Qui-Gon’s mind. As Qui-Gon’s faith in prophecy grows, Obi-Wan’s faith in him is tested—just as a threat surfaces that will demand that Master and apprentice come together as never before, or be divided forever.

30 review for Master and Apprentice

  1. 4 out of 5

    Khurram

    I was a little disappointed in this book. It was ok and good in most places. I think my main problem with the book is having read the entire Jedi Apprentice series I had a very different picture in my mind of Qui Gon Jinn and Obi Wan. This being a new universe this could be forgiven, and Claudia Gray does a very good job with her own characters, but for me she just did not seem to Qui Gon and the Jedi right for me. My problem with the Jedi was they seemed to need rescuing as much as the who they I was a little disappointed in this book. It was ok and good in most places. I think my main problem with the book is having read the entire Jedi Apprentice series I had a very different picture in my mind of Qui Gon Jinn and Obi Wan. This being a new universe this could be forgiven, and Claudia Gray does a very good job with her own characters, but for me she just did not seem to Qui Gon and the Jedi right for me. My problem with the Jedi was they seemed to need rescuing as much as the who they went on to rescue. I agree with Qui Gon they acted more like political enforcers the guardians of justice. In fairness the Samuri that the Jedi are based did that their Shogun's word as the law without question, but as a Star Wars no. The story is good but a bit slow, and does need a heavy dose of action. The parts that were good to great are things with young Qui Gon and Dooku. The book does give a reason Qui Gon was so obsessed with Anakin being the chosen one, the steps of Dooku's eventual turn, as well Obi Wan's dislike for flying. A good prequel to Episode 1, but not my favourite versions of the main characters. Good new editions (of her own characters), and possible a prophecy for the future but we will have to see how that one plays out.

  2. 4 out of 5

    megs_bookrack

    **4.5-stars** In anticipation of the Star Wars: The High Republic books releasing soon, I have been in such a mood to devour as much of the current Canon content as I can. I will tell you that reading Master and Apprentice hot on the heels of Dooku: Jedi Lost was so satisfying!!! This novel follows Jedi Master, Qui-Gon Jinn and his Padawan, Obi-Wan Kenobi. The events of this book fall after the audiobook, Dooku: Jedi Lost, and prior to the film, The Phantom Menace. Obi-Wan is Qui-Gon's first Apprent **4.5-stars** In anticipation of the Star Wars: The High Republic books releasing soon, I have been in such a mood to devour as much of the current Canon content as I can. I will tell you that reading Master and Apprentice hot on the heels of Dooku: Jedi Lost was so satisfying!!! This novel follows Jedi Master, Qui-Gon Jinn and his Padawan, Obi-Wan Kenobi. The events of this book fall after the audiobook, Dooku: Jedi Lost, and prior to the film, The Phantom Menace. Obi-Wan is Qui-Gon's first Apprentice. Their relationship is examined closely, both Qui-Gon's fears of failing his Padawan, and Obi-Wan's frustrations with his Master who often seems unavailable. After a secret is revealed, their relationship becomes more fractured that ever and it looks like it may actually be coming to an end. When Rael Averross contacts his old friend, Qui-Gon, to ask for his assistance with a political issue, the Master and Apprentice travel together to the royal court of Pijal to see if they can help. This may be their last mission together, so both men are silently dealing with a lot of emotions connected to that. Even though Qui-Gon and Obi-Wan view their duties to the Jedi Council differently, each is at their heart battling for what they think is right. There was quite a bit of political maneuvering in this one, as we see a bit more into how the Jedi Council interacts with the various planets, and governments, within the galaxy. Prophecies were also revealed on multiple occasions. In short, there was a lot going on! Really great content as far as filling in the backstory of, and providing foundation for, the events in The Phantom Menace. I could probably read this multiple times and still not pick up on everything. That's one great thing about the Star Wars Canon. It's so vast. You can read, watch and review things over and over and over and the story just keeps on growing and expanding. It's like the gift that keeps on giving. Overall, super glad I read this. I think Claudia Gray is such a great author for these stories. You can feel her passion for the whole universe coming off the page. Really well done. I am pumped to continue on with my 2020 Star Wars binge. As a side note, also a really great time to have a Disney+ subscription.

  3. 4 out of 5

    rachael ♡

    This Cover. THIS COVER!!! — Claudia stays blessing me. QUEEN OF STAR WARS NOVELS.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Peter Hale

    "Qui-Gon Jinn". Now that's a name I haven't heard in a long time; long time.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Neil R. Coulter

    My history with Claudia Gray’s Star Wars novels hasn’t been very positive. Her first, Lost Stars, was one of the early entries in the new canon, and it has a lot of fans—but for a number of reasons, I didn’t care for it. Nor did I enjoy her two Leia-focused books, Bloodline and Leia: Princess of Alderaan. But then I read her short story, “Master and Apprentice,” in From a Certain Point of View, and it was by far one of the best things I’ve read in the new canon. That story offered a quiet, reflec My history with Claudia Gray’s Star Wars novels hasn’t been very positive. Her first, Lost Stars, was one of the early entries in the new canon, and it has a lot of fans—but for a number of reasons, I didn’t care for it. Nor did I enjoy her two Leia-focused books, Bloodline and Leia: Princess of Alderaan. But then I read her short story, “Master and Apprentice,” in From a Certain Point of View, and it was by far one of the best things I’ve read in the new canon. That story offered a quiet, reflective glimpse into Obi-Wan and Qui-Gon’s ongoing friendship during Obi-Wan’s exile on Tatooine. And so I came to the full-length novel Master and Apprentice with uncertain expectations—little confidence in Gray’s ability to keep a novel-length SW story going, but cautious optimism because of the beauty of the short story featuring the same pair of characters. Added to these author-specific expectations, of course, was the fact that this novel is a prequel of sorts to one of my least favorite SW movies, The Phantom Menace—though I do love it when any author can make the prequel era better than it seemed to be in the movies. What I wasn’t expecting at all was that Master and Apprentice would be completely brilliant, one of the best SW novels I’ve read. Not only that, but it’s a book that makes me like The Phantom Menace and some of its characters much more than I would have believed possible. And it’s a novel that grows and deepens SW mythology in thoroughly satisfying ways. What an exhilarating surprise! Gray’s success with this book comes largely because she crafts a SW story that deals with grown-up issues in a mature, thoughtful way. She isn’t piecing together a story simply to get to the big space battle (there’s almost none of that in this novel), and she mostly resists the urge to fill the pages with in-jokes and references to minor things from the movies (there are a just few moments where these references are a bit heavy-handed). The result is that Master and Apprentice doesn’t feel like merely another entry in a franchise; rather, it reads like a really good book that happens to take place in the SW galaxy. The temptation for any SW author, I imagine, is to revise characters and events as we saw them in the movies. For characters from The Phantom Menace, there must be enormous temptation to offer slightly different, improved versions in a novel. Gray, however, takes Qui-Gon and Obi-Wan as they’re presented to us in the movie. Qui-Gon is flawed, overly interior in his interpersonal relationships, puzzlingly cerebral—just as we see him in the movie. Seventeen-year-old Obi-Wan is . . . well, he’s kind of a smug little dork—full of himself, obsessively devoted to the rules of the Jedi order, a bit arrogant, sarcastic when he should be sincere and questioning. That’s how we see young Obi-Wan all throughout the prequel trilogy, and Gray gives us a younger version of exactly that character. The characters feel true, and thus the story around them works; everything allows us to face the awkwardness of the film but also adds depth to why that awkwardness is there. These flawed characters don’t exist just to have cool lightsaber battles. In this story, they exist and interact (and conflict) in real ways. Gray explores the Master/Padawan relationship in all its strangeness and difficulty. She shows us Qui-Gon’s struggles, wanting to be a good mentor but often feeling that he’s exactly the wrong guide for Obi-Wan. That’s something that as a teacher, I can relate to. Obi-Wan must also work through the confusion of figuring out whether his mentor is proud of him, whether he’s on the right path, whether his teacher really wants to be teaching him at all. I can understand that, too, from when I was a grad student. These two characters and their evolving relationship are portrayed with care and nuance. The realism keeps the story unpredictable, even though I knew of course where these characters ultimately end up. As I read, however, I couldn’t predict exactly how they were going to get where they needed to be. That is so refreshing for a SW novel. Gray successfully balances a few different narrative threads that come together at various points, and she creates new characters who are interesting and real. She starts with basic character sketches—a man who was raised by 81 3PO droids on a derelict ship; a woman who was taken into slavery as a child; a Jedi who has always felt (and acted) like an outsider—and builds characters who work really well. They never feel like mildly different versions of existing characters from the films (a problem that plagues SW writing). These are originals. The basic plot, outside of the master/apprentice relationship, is a political intrigue story on a planet we haven’t seen before. I’ve often complained about SW novels, that the politics is always kept on a very juvenile level and not allowed to be as complex and real-world-mirroring as it might be. The politics in Master and Apprentice are as close as we’ve yet approached to genuinely intriguing, complex politics in SW. The Jedi face multiple unanswerable questions that test their loyalties and priorities: Is it right to abandon one planet to slavery in order to potentially save many other planets? Is it possible to be so focused on one good act that you can be blinded to evil that’s growing all around you? How much insubordination is allowable, and what justifies it? When is it right to report on the insubordination of a superior? I loved the layers of complexity built into every aspect of this story. At the heart of the story is the question of prophecy, which has been the elephant in the galaxy ever since George Lucas brought prophecies into SW and then never explained what part they play in the story. The questions Gray wrestles with include: Were prophecies meaningful only in the time of those who made them? Do they predict specific events that have happened or are yet to happen? In trying to see into the future, are we really just trying to be in control of that future? All of that is rather more deep than SW usually gets, and it’s watching the characters (Qui-Gon in particular) confront those questions that’s most interesting, even more than reading and wondering about the texts of the prophecies themselves in light of the grand SW mythology. Some of the prophecies mentioned in the book make a lot of sense in reference to the movies (the prophecy of the Chosen One, finally given here, for example), and others seem still elusive (“He who learns to conquer death will through his greatest student live again” (288)—at this point, that seems like it could refer to any number of pairings in the movies, and perhaps will become clearer after Episode 9). But the real question through it all is: What is prophecy, really? Having finished Master and Apprentice, I’m doing something I very rarely do after reading a SW novel: I’m pondering it. Most of these books are quickly read, as quickly forgotten. This one will stick with me. I’m sorry that I haven’t enjoyed most of Gray’s SW writing up to this point, but with Master and Apprentice she has created a fantastic SW story. I hope that, having found her groove, she will continue to contribute to building the mythology.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Grace

    Me, mining this book exhaustively for every tiny detail about Jedi Order tradition, the master & padawan relationship, the layout of the Jedi Temple, and ancient Jedi prophecy: Wait, this book is supposed to have, like, a story? This book does, in fact, have a story, and the story is mostly about Qui-Gon Jinn. Obi-Wan is there, and we occasionally dip into his perspective, but the journey is mostly Qui-Gon's, the growth is mostly Qui-Gon's, and the eyes through which we view events are almost alw Me, mining this book exhaustively for every tiny detail about Jedi Order tradition, the master & padawan relationship, the layout of the Jedi Temple, and ancient Jedi prophecy: Wait, this book is supposed to have, like, a story? This book does, in fact, have a story, and the story is mostly about Qui-Gon Jinn. Obi-Wan is there, and we occasionally dip into his perspective, but the journey is mostly Qui-Gon's, the growth is mostly Qui-Gon's, and the eyes through which we view events are almost always Qui-Gon's. The concept of lineage is a powerful thread throughout this book. Occasional flashbacks take us back to Qui-Gon's childhood, and Dooku is a strongly felt presence in everyone's mind even when he's not physically there. We get to meet Dooku's first padawan, and as Qui-Gon grapples with his current relationship with Obi-Wan, he is just as strongly anchored in the past as he is in the present. The massive thrust of this book is the moral dilemma(s). Qui-Gon is at a transition point, struggling with his relationship with Obi-Wan, struggling with his understanding of prophecy, struggling with his perception of morality and the role of the Jedi Order... He's pretty much going through it. If you're into flawed, well-meaning characters and debating moral issues that may have no one right answer, you'll probably like this book. Qui-Gon comes off as a hypocrite half the time, but it's palpable how hard he's trying and how committed he is to doing "the right thing" -- whatever that may be. Confronting your own blind spots and flaws is something that comes up a lot. Obi-Wan totally blanks out when asked what would happen if two Jedi were to fight each other. "They wouldn't," he says. "The Jedi are united." Even though JUST chapters ago they discussed a sad case where a master killed his own padawan. Qui-Gon goes off on another Jedi for having a sexual dalliance (which doesn't technically break the Code) and then we learn that HE literally has a tragic romance (which EXPLICITLY breaks the Code) in his past. This whole book is a journey of self-knowledge and growth. It's very Jedi. Personally, I have to admit that my favorite thing about this book was the details I was able to glean about Jedi life. Some things I learned: • Council Masters don't take padawans • The Jedi Temple has aquatic levels that are completely underwater • There's a meditation maze (?) • Padawans are expected to perform some traditional "squire" type tasks, such as caring for their master's tack and boots, etc. • THERE IS A TRAINING DOJO RESERVED SPECIFICALLY FOR PADAWANS. This means nothing to anyone else, but I'm smug about it because I CALLED it. • We continue to go with the new canon norm of taking padawans when they're in their mid-teens, instead of the Legends norm of aging out at thirteen years old • THEY WENT BACK TO CELIBACY. Really? We're seriously doing this? Come on, Claudia. • You can check holocrons out of the Archives • Masters and padawans live in separate rooms (I'm never going to accept this. Give me a master/padawan suite or give me death) • Jedi don't get to choose the color of their lightsabers Other notable details: • Despite the "older padawans" norm we're going with, Obi-Wan was 13 at the time he became Qui-Gon's padawan. This, combined with Obi-Wan's overwhelming feelings of inadequacy and how much time Qui-Gon spends vaguely being a jerk? Claudia Gray said JEDI APPRENTICE RIGHTS. • Qui-Gon's painful past romance??? Tahl, am I right ladies • Depa Billaba side-eyeing Yoda while saying "the Council needs fresh perspectives" I LOVE • I'm a BIG fan of Rael. I love him. Poor guy. • "Up the hell, he should shut." • I'm so FREAKING glad to get a look at the actual text of the Chosen One prophecy. All the other prophecies are intriguing as well. Some seem to be utter nonsense, while others might have any number of explanations. I'm hoping someone smart will do an in-depth analysis. • Obi-Wan LOVES TO FLY!!! HE SURE DOES!! I LOVE THIS SHOUTOUT TO HIS CHILDHOOD ENTHUSIASM FOR FLYING AS ALLUDED TO IN ROGUE PLANET. • His traumatic piloting experience wasn't traumatic ENOUGH to explain such a sudden and extreme flip in sentiment, though. I'm going to need more background on what happened to make him hate flying. • "People are more than their worst act. They are also more than the worst thing ever done to them." • Dooku and Qui-Gon having a close and powerful bond is NOT something we have ever… seen before. I’m torn on whether I believe it or not, but it’s definitely an interesting dynamic to think about, especially with Qui-Gon emphasizing all the ways he and Dooku were similar, whereas he and Obi-Wan are so different. Are he and Dooku really THAT similar?! • Can't believe Rael was literally offered a Sith apprenticeship and went, "Nah... I mean, I kinda like the Light." • Pretty sure I fought some people from Czerka Mining Corporation once. Were they in KOTOR 2? • The contrast between how the Jedi Order handled Rael, given the late age at which he came to the Order, and how they handled Anakin. They "erred on the side of mercy" and "treated him with compassion," tolerating Rael's non-conformance and iconoclastic attitude with leniency. Was this deliberately put here as a thought provoker? If so, it's working. • The situation with the princess escalated SO QUICKLY and then somehow deescalated equally as fast. It was jarring. From "oh what a charming, precocious girl" to "OH GOSH SHE'S MURDERING EVERYBODY" and then suddenly back to "she's confined to her room for now, maybe she'll go to college and do something useful later on." Like yeah, I get that, we all go through a "ruthless murder" stage at the age of fourteen, right? • I'm SICK of all this SLAVERY in my GALAXY

  7. 5 out of 5

    Ben Brown

    I’ve long maintained that in the time since Disney’s purchase of “Star Wars” in 2012, the very best materials released thus far in the new canon – and I’m including all of the new movies under this umbrella – have been Claudia Gray’s “Star Wars” novels. “Lost Stars,” “Bloodline”, and “Leia: Princess of Alderaan” are all TERRIFIC books, taking characters that we all know and love and placing them in thrilling, very OT-“Star Wars”-esque narratives. Which makes the fact that “Master and Apprentice, I’ve long maintained that in the time since Disney’s purchase of “Star Wars” in 2012, the very best materials released thus far in the new canon – and I’m including all of the new movies under this umbrella – have been Claudia Gray’s “Star Wars” novels. “Lost Stars,” “Bloodline”, and “Leia: Princess of Alderaan” are all TERRIFIC books, taking characters that we all know and love and placing them in thrilling, very OT-“Star Wars”-esque narratives. Which makes the fact that “Master and Apprentice,” Gray’s newest novel, never quite reaches the heights of her previous “Star Wars” work, admittedly, a tad disappointing – any time an auteur delivers a new piece work, it’s hard not to hope it will live up to the expectations set by his/her past output. Still – the fact that “Master and Apprentice” isn’t as intriguing as “Bloodline” or as epic in scope as “Lost Stars” doesn’t change the fact that it’s still, on its own terms, a pretty satisfying read, one that plays in a corner of the “Star Wars” sandbox that not a lot of other new-canon-novels have yet dared to venture – the Prequel Era. The fact that Gray also does yeoman’s work taking a relationship that we only saw glimpses of onscreen – the bond between Master Qui-Gon Jinn and apprentice Obi-Wan Kenobi – and building it into something that’s genuinely nuanced and complicated is a real treat to behold, and reason alone to make it well worth the time of any “Star Wars” fan.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Mogsy (MMOGC)

    4.5 of 5 stars at The BiblioSanctum https://bibliosanctum.com/2019/05/02/... I have been most impressed with Claudia Gray’s books in the new Star Wars canon, and I have to say, she has yet to disappoint me. Now she’s at the top of her game once again with Star Wars: Master & Apprentice, a novel set a handful of years before the events of The Phantom Menace which shines the light on 17-year-old padawan Obi-Wan Kenobi and his complicated relationship with his mentor, Qui-Gon Jinn. When the book begi 4.5 of 5 stars at The BiblioSanctum https://bibliosanctum.com/2019/05/02/... I have been most impressed with Claudia Gray’s books in the new Star Wars canon, and I have to say, she has yet to disappoint me. Now she’s at the top of her game once again with Star Wars: Master & Apprentice, a novel set a handful of years before the events of The Phantom Menace which shines the light on 17-year-old padawan Obi-Wan Kenobi and his complicated relationship with his mentor, Qui-Gon Jinn. When the book begins, the two Jedi have already been working together for several years, though deep down, both suspect that their current arrangement may be soon coming to an end. They are simply too different in their views of the Force, with Qui-Gon with his unconventional thinking and sometimes flagrant disregard for the Jedi Council’s advice while Obi-Wan is more of a stickler for the rules. These differences have created a tension between master and apprentice that both know can’t go on for much longer. So when Qui-Gon is unexpected offered a seat on the Council to replace a retiring member, a part of him believes that the change may be for the best. No one would expect him to turn down such a prestigious position, and consequently, Obi-Wan can be transferred to a different master out of necessity. But before the older Jedi can make such a momentous decision, he knows he must meditate upon it, and in the meantime, he and his apprentice are dispatched to the planet of Pijal where an old acquaintance of Qui-Gon’s has requested their assistance in defusing a political situation between the royal house and their opposition. This contact is Rael Averross, a rogue Jedi who was also a former student of Dooku, like Qui-Gon Jinn. Averross is currently serving as lord regent to Pijal’s princess, her Serene Highness Fanry, who is only fourteen years old and is heir to a throne fraught with a history of political tension. Her planet is now in a position to affect the economic futures of other worlds in the region, and a corporation called Czerka also has stakes in the new hyperspace lane venture that is being discussed. When terrorists threaten to place that all in danger, Averross decides to call upon his old friend Qui-Gon despite the two of them having drifted apart over the years, because he knows Pijal is going to need all the help it can get. The urgency of the situation also leads the Jedi to enlist the aid of a couple of jewel thieves named Rahara, an escaped slave from Czerka, and Pax, a social outcast raised by a crew of protocol droids aboard an abandoned ship. Despite their differences, our motley crew of characters must work together to protect Fanry and safeguard Pijal’s interests. Meanwhile, Qui-Gon also needs to figure out what to do with his apprentice, as well as sort out his doubts with regards to his beliefs in ancient Jedi prophecies. For a media tie-in novel, Master & Apprentice is surprisingly complex and layered. There’s certainly a lot to unpack here, compared to some of the more recent releases in the Star Wars canon. However, the central theme of the book is undeniably the relationship between Qui-Gon and Obi-Wan. Gray explores this dynamic using a number of ways, including flashing back to Dooku and Qui-Gon’s time as master and apprentice to show how an individual Jedi’s views can be shaped by their style of training and instruction. It is perhaps no coincidence that both of Dooku’s students, Qui-Gon and Rael Averross, have ended up with rebellious natures, given the kind of person their teacher was and the Dark Side path he chose. But back to the relationships between Qui-Gon and Obi-Wan: in the late 90s, I started reading a series of now-Legends middle grade novels called Jedi Apprentice, the first book of which was called The Rising Force and told the story of how they became master and apprentice. As this series was marketed for children, I didn’t demand too much from it, though I do recall wishing it had been a deeper exploration of the two characters’ personalities and bond as it went along. Twenty years later, it’s like Claudia Gray has finally written the kind of story I wanted. Qui-Gon’s fear of failing his apprentice is written incredibly well, and likewise so is Obi-Wan’s struggle to understand his master and his determination not to disappoint him. It was heartbreaking to read about their anxieties, knowing that deep down, they both loved and respected each other very much. And of course, another one of the novel’s major topics is prophecy. I mean, considering how the Jedi prophecy of the “Chosen One” was the main impetus behind Anakin Skywalker and the whole Star Wars saga, this is huge—and accordingly, Gray gives this theme the gravitas and weight it deserves. Qui-Gon’s views on prophecies, which also explained his motivations in The Phantom Menace, were addressed here in Master & Apprentice, and also sets up a number of theories for Star Wars fans to chew on with regards to the new movies. Typical of the author’s Star Wars novels, the characterization was also done extremely well. There’s a clear emphasis on developing relationships, and there are a whole web of them here to consider. The story takes a look at both past and present, examining the relationships of multiple sets of masters and apprentices, as well as the role the Jedi Council has played in those dynamics. In addition, we have the side characters and their relationships to each other and the protagonists. Following in the footsteps of a long line of rogue Jedi in Star Wars fiction, Rael Averross’ infectious personality and emotional openness completely stole the show for me. Rahara and Pax were also a joy to read about, and their personal stories offer some commentary on darker activities that still go on in the Republic, including smuggling and slavery. And then there are the shadowy villains and other dubious organizations like Czerka and or the Opposition on Pijal, though Gray is so subtle and clever with her writing that there will be twists and surprises you won’t see coming. Needless to say, in my eyes, Master & Apprentice is one of the new canon’s better books. Personally, I also think it’s one of Claudia Gray’s bolder Star Wars novels, where she tackles more mature themes and uses some modern vernacular and risqué language which felt a little out of place at times (keep in mind I’m talking by Star Wars standards here, and I know some people let their younger kids read Star Wars tie-ins, so reader discretion is advised). To sum things up though, I had a great time with this novel, and after reading it, I also think it would be fantastic to see more prequel or pre-prequel era Star Wars books in the future. Audiobook Comments: I absolutely adored Jonathan Davis’ performance on the Star Wars: Master & Apprentice audiobook. He’s always been known to me as “that Star Wars narrator who can do an amazing Darth Vader voice”, but obviously he’s incredibly talented and can do a lot more than that. Short of getting Liam Neeson himself to read this book, I don’t think you could have gotten a better voice actor for Qui-Gon Jinn. Stellar performance, as always.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Lucie

    3.5 stars January 28, 2020: after reading it For me, Master and Apprentice wasn't easy to get along with, at first: I struggled a bit to get a sense of the characters and found it to be a bit slow, but once I got into it, I really enjoyed it! Every tiny bit of world-building in this galaxy always makes me the happiest: in this, I loved that it explored the prophecies, as well as kyber crystals (I just love when they talk about the kyber crystals, what can I say) and how rebellious Qui-Gon was (he 3.5 stars January 28, 2020: after reading it For me, Master and Apprentice wasn't easy to get along with, at first: I struggled a bit to get a sense of the characters and found it to be a bit slow, but once I got into it, I really enjoyed it! Every tiny bit of world-building in this galaxy always makes me the happiest: in this, I loved that it explored the prophecies, as well as kyber crystals (I just love when they talk about the kyber crystals, what can I say) and how rebellious Qui-Gon was (he was so right, I'm super mad at the Jedi Council too). Reading about Qui-Gon and Obi-Wan's relationship wasn't always easy, as it was quite tense for most of the novel, but I loved how it was developed and how they got closer in the end, it made me so happy. I also really enjoyed getting little glimpses of Count Dooku's past, his relationship with Qui-Gon and the characters wondering what he was up to now, it made me super excited to read Dooku: Jedi Lost in the future! The last chapter, set at the end of The Phantom Menace, made me cry so much though, and now I feel like a prequel trilogy rewatch is more than in order. All in all, it's not my favourite of Claudia Gray's Star Wars novel (my heart belongs to Bloodline), but it was still pretty good, it made me nostalgic and I had a nice time reading it, so it worked for me. I only have Lost Stars left, then I'll be all caught up with Claudia Gray's Star Wars novels, so I can't wait to get to that one! July 29, 2018: announcement day A NEW STAR WARS BOOK BY CLAUDIA GRAY. I NEED IT NOW. Qui-Gon Jinn and Obi-Wan Kenobi. We've been given so much new content for the prequel trilogy lately and it's making me appreciate this era more than I used to, I am so happy.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jim C

    This book takes place before the prequel movies. In this one, Qui-Gon and Obi-Wan are sent to a planet that is about to sign a treaty that will open a hyperspace corridor which means this planet will be connected to the rest of the galaxy. Obviously, things don't go as planned. This book is a terrific look into the relationship between master and padawan. It is also a terrific look into each character especially Qui-Gon. Their relationship isn't the smoothest and we get to see why as these two di This book takes place before the prequel movies. In this one, Qui-Gon and Obi-Wan are sent to a planet that is about to sign a treaty that will open a hyperspace corridor which means this planet will be connected to the rest of the galaxy. Obviously, things don't go as planned. This book is a terrific look into the relationship between master and padawan. It is also a terrific look into each character especially Qui-Gon. Their relationship isn't the smoothest and we get to see why as these two different characters differ in opinion. I believe this is such a strong book for Qui-Gon's character and it explains the character in The Phantom Menace. I loved the look into how he doesn't exactly conform to the Jedi Council and this tells why he believes so strongly in the prophesy of why Anakin is the Chosen One. The strength of this novel is that it works on so many levels. It touches upon slavery, political maneuverings, and the environment a child is raised in. Some of the new characters are an absolute delight and I demand a novel about a Pax and Rahara adventure. Usually books in this universe are about a contained adventure. This book fits in perfectly in its timeline but works because everything is subtle with its storytelling. Whether it is the road the relationship is on between Qui-Gon and Obi-Wan or finding out why Obi-Wan doesn't like flying it comes together perfectly. I did think that the beginning was a little slow so that is why I did not give this five stars. Once again Claudia Gray has proven that she just gets it with this universe. I did enjoy Lost Stars more by her but I do think this is a better written book. After reading this you will be asking yourself when is the next Star Wars book by Claudia Gray being released?

  11. 4 out of 5

    Robert

    “It matters which side we choose. Even if there will never be more light than darkness. Even if there can be no more joy in the galaxy than there is pain. For every action we undertake, for every word we speak, for every life we touch—it matters. I don’t turn toward the light because it means someday I’ll ‘win’ some sort of cosmic game. I turn toward it because it is the light.” We live in morally grey times, and to its credit the mythos of Star Wars is flexing to incorporate a little more cynic “It matters which side we choose. Even if there will never be more light than darkness. Even if there can be no more joy in the galaxy than there is pain. For every action we undertake, for every word we speak, for every life we touch—it matters. I don’t turn toward the light because it means someday I’ll ‘win’ some sort of cosmic game. I turn toward it because it is the light.” We live in morally grey times, and to its credit the mythos of Star Wars is flexing to incorporate a little more cynicism and divergent points of view (even certain ones) so, for me, the most refreshing part of this book was following Qui-Gon's journey to confront his inner doubts as to how he might best serve the Living Force and his Jedi ethics while inhabiting a corrupted and corrupting Galaxy. Were there fun chase scenes? the odd clash of lightsabers? odd ball scoundrels with hearts of gold? Sure, all those classic Star Wars elements are there, but at its core this was a story about Qui-Gon, his relationship with a priggish and touchy young Obi-Wan, and also the echoes of his own relationship with his Jedi Master Dooku before he left the order behind and succumbed entirely to the temptations of the Dark Side. As with all Claudia Gray Star Wars books, highly recommended.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Cho

    I'm preparing to fall into another star wars phase in two months and I have no regrets. The Jude Watson series about these two was basically my childhood.

  13. 5 out of 5

    DiscoSpacePanther

    This book has many shortcomings, but in the end these were irrelevant to me, because I simply enjoyed the story. The strongest elements are the development of Qui-Gon Jinn’s relationships with both Obi-Wan Kenobi and Count Dooku—these are the best character-based parts to the story, and I was happy that (to the best of my knowledge) they didn’t seriously contradict any of the pre-Disney Legends canon, so that this book can sit comfortably enough in both (or either) continuities. There are some as This book has many shortcomings, but in the end these were irrelevant to me, because I simply enjoyed the story. The strongest elements are the development of Qui-Gon Jinn’s relationships with both Obi-Wan Kenobi and Count Dooku—these are the best character-based parts to the story, and I was happy that (to the best of my knowledge) they didn’t seriously contradict any of the pre-Disney Legends canon, so that this book can sit comfortably enough in both (or either) continuities. There are some aspects of the prophecies that fit both continuities really well (particularly since Kylo Ren and Darth Caedus are so similar). There were space battles, lightsabre fights and blaster firefights aplenty, as well as smugglers and jewel thieves and evil corporations—this felt like a proper Star Wars story. I assume it is intentionally similar to The Phantom Menace, having Qui-Gon and Obi-Wan sent to a planet to aid a teenaged monarch in trouble, but it feels somewhat creatively lacking at first. Royalty in Star Wars is a pet peeve of mine—there was an arc about Mon Cala from The Clone Wars that I hated because it was all about hereditary monarchy—but the handling of it here is a little more sophisticated than usual, even though the writing style does not always match the conceptual level. Early on I felt a little queasy about the whole Jedi Regent Rael Averross / Queen Fanry relationship—him being a middle-aged man and her being a fourteen-year-old girl—I don’t think you’re supposed to read anything romantic into it, but it comes uncomfortably close on Rael’s part, sometimes. Although this is never addressed directly, the conclusion to the book renders any subtext here irrelevant (thankfully), and I think that the author ties the relationship closely enough to the fate of Averross’s padawan sufficiently well that a misreading is averted. The only real negatives for me were simply a matter of taste: 1. There is still a strong YA quality to Gray’s work here, not as obvious as in the officially titled YA works, but still not quite fully adult. For a book targeted at adults it commits the sin of overexplaining simple terms and concepts that any mature person would already be extremely familiar with (e.g. slavery). I think that a non-YA promoted novel can credit its readership with a little more worldliness! 2. Gray has a tendency to use the word ‘nanotech’ in a way that a writer from the 1940s would use ‘atomic’—it feels as though it will be charmingly dated in a few decades, but until then it will sound superfuturistic. Kind of how ‘cybercrime’ would have sounded in the 1980s. 3. As with the lack of analytical foundation shown by Gray’s writing in Lost Stars (where she has a pilot compensating for the gravitational field when launching from the Death Star, when in actual fact the Death Star’s gravitational pull would be imperceptible), there are occasional scientific howlers. For example, at one point the protagonists deduce that there is weapons manufacturing going on because they detect protons. I was always under the impression that protons were as common as hydrogen ions, so without any other factor they wouldn’t definitively be indicative of anything. Perhaps in Star Wars terminology this is something different! For me, the best part of the story was the climax—it was far more satisfying (and unexpected) than I had anticipated, and makes me think that I would be more than happy to give this one a re-read in future. I think it will work particularly well in conjunction with James Luceno's Cloak of Deception, which is also a Qui-Gon and Obi-Wan story. Recommended to all Star Wars fans, particularly those that feel that the prequels have had short-shrift since the Disney takeover.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Brooke — brooklynnnnereads

    Similarly to the Star Wars films, this novel was action PACKED. From start to finish, it was a quick novel to read due to the action and the pacing of the story, but I forced myself to read it slowly so I didn't miss any details or foreshadowing. Even with paying close attention, I'm sure I missed small details of the story to come. This novel was my first experience reading a book set in the Star Wars universe and I can't wait to read more. It gave me a better understanding of the story behind Similarly to the Star Wars films, this novel was action PACKED. From start to finish, it was a quick novel to read due to the action and the pacing of the story, but I forced myself to read it slowly so I didn't miss any details or foreshadowing. Even with paying close attention, I'm sure I missed small details of the story to come. This novel was my first experience reading a book set in the Star Wars universe and I can't wait to read more. It gave me a better understanding of the story behind the scenes and an even better understanding of the characters Qui-Gon Jinn and Obi-Wan Kenobi (I especially liked the final chapter/epilogue). For any fans of the movie series, I think this book would be a happy addition. From my understanding, I believe this novel is "canon" but I would happily read this novel even if it was not.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Allyson

    This was...not the book I was looking for. CG wrote the two (pretty unarguably) best books in the new Star Wars canon, so it's safe to say my expectations for this were pretty high -- especially since Obi-Wan is my favorite character not named Ahsoka Tano. But... The political plot was as dull as that of The Phantom Menace. And character-wise, Qui-Gon remains as inscrutable as ever, while Obi-Wan has been shoved into a box labeled "persnickety rule-follower and/or whiny teenager." I mean??? No one This was...not the book I was looking for. CG wrote the two (pretty unarguably) best books in the new Star Wars canon, so it's safe to say my expectations for this were pretty high -- especially since Obi-Wan is my favorite character not named Ahsoka Tano. But... The political plot was as dull as that of The Phantom Menace. And character-wise, Qui-Gon remains as inscrutable as ever, while Obi-Wan has been shoved into a box labeled "persnickety rule-follower and/or whiny teenager." I mean??? No one has any depth. Honestly, this book felt like it was ghost-written by someone pretending to be CG, because I sensed ZERO emotion in any of these pages. I'm guessing M&A was supposed to be about, well, Master Qui-Gon and Apprentice Obi-Wan's bond, but literally all we see is them clashing idly with each other. Which is all well and good, if that bond is eventually built back up. But it's not. I miss Jedi Apprentice. =(

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jerry

    Years ago, there was a fabulous Star Wars novel series called Jedi Apprentice. Though it was intended for younger readers--after all, it was published by Scholastic--it brought new life to the character of Qui-Gon Jinn, who I always wished we'd seen more of after he got killed in The Phantom Menace. Jude Watson, who wrote all but the first book in that series, did an excellent job of bringing a galaxy far, far away to the page. So, then...why are they giving us an alternate version of Qui-Gon and Years ago, there was a fabulous Star Wars novel series called Jedi Apprentice. Though it was intended for younger readers--after all, it was published by Scholastic--it brought new life to the character of Qui-Gon Jinn, who I always wished we'd seen more of after he got killed in The Phantom Menace. Jude Watson, who wrote all but the first book in that series, did an excellent job of bringing a galaxy far, far away to the page. So, then...why are they giving us an alternate version of Qui-Gon and Obi-Wan prior to Episode I? Like usual, Disney is bent on reinventing the Star Wars universe...but they're trying to fix something that isn't broken. Instead of giving us characters and situations that never existed before the current film trilogy, why not make movies or television shows out of the stories that already existed, such as the Thrawn trilogy or the X-Wing series? I hate to say it, because I'm a longtime fan of the House of Mouse...but I think Disney has brought Lucas' space opera into a state of disrepair. Somebody else needs to grab the reins...and soon!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Drewthereader20

    This was so good. Plz check out the audiobook of this one! There were a lot of sound effects and nice voice acting as well!(:

  18. 4 out of 5

    Ashley

    Still ace at Star Wars novels, Claudia. I really should read her non-Star Wars work at some point, but every time I finish one of her SW books, I'm left satisfied, and feel no need to do so. Perhaps this is a mistake. This book was unexpected, both in that she chose to write about the earlier period of Qui-Gon Jinn and Obi-Wan Kenobi's partnership instead of the later period most SW writers play in, and that I enjoyed it so much, when I'm usually not that into prequel-era Star Wars very much. I Still ace at Star Wars novels, Claudia. I really should read her non-Star Wars work at some point, but every time I finish one of her SW books, I'm left satisfied, and feel no need to do so. Perhaps this is a mistake. This book was unexpected, both in that she chose to write about the earlier period of Qui-Gon Jinn and Obi-Wan Kenobi's partnership instead of the later period most SW writers play in, and that I enjoyed it so much, when I'm usually not that into prequel-era Star Wars very much. I just don't have as much emotional connection to the characters, even though both Liam Neeson and Ewan McGregor bring gravitas to the material that makes me have affection for them (and Obi-Wan features quite a bit in the Clone Wars TV show). While there is a space adventure here, featuring a coronation, a galactic treaty, terrorists jeopardizing that treaty, and an evil galactic corporation that exists on slave labor, this is really a book about the emotional relationship between Qui-Gon and his fourteen year old apprentice, Obi-Wan. Qui-Gon has been given a chance to join the Jedi Council, which is a surprise because he so often is at odds with them. This drives a wedge in their already fragile master/apprentice relationship, as Obi-Wan feels like he has never been good enough for Qui-Gon, and that he doesn't understand his master; Qui-Gon leaving to join the Council feels like an abandonment on top of that. Qui-Gon also has struggled in how to reach Obi-Wan. He is not one to follow the rules blindly and often does things not by the book. He feels torn by his desire to join the Council, and what he sees as his duty to Obi-Wan. I thought the book did an excellent job of portraying the emotional arcs of both characters, and their resulting conflict. Watching them clash with one another while being able to see inside of their thoughts, and that they both respected each other but couldn't find a way to communicate that, was a little heartbreaking. This book gets at the heart of the Jedi/Padawan relationship, how even though Jedi aren't supposed to love, it's impossible for a master not to care for, even love, an apprentice they spend years bringing up, and for an apprentice to care for the Jedi who raised them. We get echoes of this in the relationships between Jedi Rael Averross (also an apprentice of Dooku) and his Padawan, and with the princess he acts as Regent for on the planet Pijal, as well as the relationship between Qui-Gonn and Dooku himself in the form of flashbacks. The one thing that didn't work perfectly for me is that there are hints to the overall Star Wars mythology in the ancient Jedi prophecies that Qui-Gonn studies, including one that I'm pretty sure predicted the births of Leia and Ben Solo ("She who will be born to darkness will give birth to darkness," or something like that; I've returned the book to the library). The reason that I didn't like this very much is that I wanted to know what all those prophecies were referring to! And we don't get any answers. Obviously this is a Me complaint; the prophecies were deployed strategically, and I think Gray meant them to be a fun nod, not something to obsess over (like Qui-Gonn and Dooku do). Well I can't help that I'm obsessive and hate unsolved puzzles, which in one of life's great ironies, I am terrible at solving.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Christina

    “‘It matters,’ Qui-Gon said quietly. ‘It matters which side we choose. Even if there will never be more light than darkness. Even if there is no more joy in the galaxy than there is pain. For every action we undertake, for every word we speak, for every life we touch-it matters. I don’t turn towards the light because it means someday I’ll ‘win’ some sort of cosmic game. I turn because it is the light.’” The Master and Apprentice is set 8 years before The Phantom Menace and shows the struggles and “‘It matters,’ Qui-Gon said quietly. ‘It matters which side we choose. Even if there will never be more light than darkness. Even if there is no more joy in the galaxy than there is pain. For every action we undertake, for every word we speak, for every life we touch-it matters. I don’t turn towards the light because it means someday I’ll ‘win’ some sort of cosmic game. I turn because it is the light.’” The Master and Apprentice is set 8 years before The Phantom Menace and shows the struggles and miscommunication between a master and apprentice. It also contains very heartfelt themes, new interesting characters and a very well-developed world/history by Claudia Gray. The book has multiple POVs but it’s mainly focused on Qui-Gon Jinn and includes interesting flashbacks of Count Dooku and Padawan Qui-Gon Jinn. It’s a perfect tie-in as I’m currently reading Dooku: Jedi Lost. Qui-Gon Jinn has to be one of my favourite Jedi because of his realistic opinions and actions. It was very nice to see more of his specific ideas and the parallels of Count Dooku and him. In the end, he chooses the light side despite the corruption of the Jedi and Republic because he is a true example of a Jedi. We learn quite a bit about prophecies and new canon about the Jedi temple. -There is an Aquatic level of the Jedi Temple -Padawans have homework and roles of fetching things for their master -Holocrons can be burrowed/checked out of the archives -Meditation maze (it was featured in last clone wars episodes s6 but you only see a bit of what I assume is the maze?) -Council masters don’t take Padawans with some exceptions -The role of Seekers Although this book does have slow pacing at the start and seem hard to adjust to with the multiple POVs / flashbacks it really all comes together. Obi-Wan Kenobi is one of my favourite characters. We see him struggle and the contrast between his master- his ethic to follow every rule and to work hard. We start to see the snarky Obi-Wan Kenobi we all know and love at the end of the book. One of my favourite minor scenes is where he rides a varactyl for the first time as it’s a nice callback to ROTS plus, the species is one of my favourites. I didn’t feel like the ship incident would’ve made him hate flying forever. The ending hit me in the gut because I was not expecting to receive a scene from The Phantom Menace (well it wasn’t specifically from it but an extra emotional scene) I liked how it showed Obi-Wan Kenobi’s worries aka how unfit he was which is why Anakin turned to the Dark Side.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Melinda

    3.75⭐️ I liked this book! I know I know it’s SW, but it was a bit too much politics for me... But at the end I liked how it wrapped up everything. (Also I’m very distracted because of what is happening in the World these days, so maybe I will read it again one day when I won’t be stressed this much, and I will be able to concentrate more)

  21. 4 out of 5

    Catherine Stormblessed

    QUI-GON AND OBI-WAN ARE PRECIOUS AND MUST BE PROTECTED (except they’re both dead now so RIP...BUT STILL). I’m glad I could finally get to this. The characterization and overall quality of this novel is fantastic. Claudia Gray is such a great asset to the Star Wars novelizations. I love how she stays true to the heart of Star Wars. It feels so authentic and immersive. I absolutely loved gaining a more intimate knowledge of Qui-Gon and Obi-Wan’s dynamic. Father and son relationships are so wholesome QUI-GON AND OBI-WAN ARE PRECIOUS AND MUST BE PROTECTED (except they’re both dead now so RIP...BUT STILL). I’m glad I could finally get to this. The characterization and overall quality of this novel is fantastic. Claudia Gray is such a great asset to the Star Wars novelizations. I love how she stays true to the heart of Star Wars. It feels so authentic and immersive. I absolutely loved gaining a more intimate knowledge of Qui-Gon and Obi-Wan’s dynamic. Father and son relationships are so wholesome and I love it. I love how different they are. They struggled so much in terms of getting along and communicating with each other because Qui-Gon is the definition of chaos and ideal thinking and Obi-Wan is the definition of lawful good. Qui-Gon’s idealistic way of thinking I think is such a great way to be a Jedi. I’ve always admired how much more radical he is, which is why Yoda was so hesitant to allow him on the council. Meanwhile Obi-Wan worships the rules of the council and enjoys structure and direction. I also loved how there’s more info of Count Dooku and his time as a Jedi and Qui-Gon’s master. There is a great deal of political intrigue that enhances the story beautifully. That is one of the many reasons I’ve always LOVED the prequels. The war has so many negotiations that invite a lens of understanding in terms of how many Jedi think and act. It’s why we get great characterization. This story is even more incredible because it specifically dives into prophecies about the Jedi and the chosen one aka Anakin Skywalker. I have always admired how Qui-Gon was really the only one who believed in Anakin and his role in the galaxy. One of my favorite quotes is when Qui-Gon states, “Not every disagreement with Jedi orthodoxy turns you into a Sith overnight.” The Jedi aspire for peace but I think aren’t entirely successful because they are unable to abandon toxic traditions. Visions are not trusted by the council because they are unreliable. However, I think a big lesson to be learned is that everyone’s spiritual experiences are so individual it’s unfair for other people to declare spiritual experiences as unreliable and non-existent because you don’t understand them. I love how Qui-Gon is willing to change but also EXPERIMENTS with the ways of the force to understand it better. He doesn’t wholly declare his visions unreliable, but searches for truth even when he does not fully understand. I love that. The force is constant event when agreements and order are not. I’ve always been absolutely entranced by Star Wars’ definition of good versus evil. In this book Qui-Gon has a particular interaction with another Jedi about the prophecies of the chosen one. He elaborates on how touching darkness is not something you do once, but multiple times and must choose to turn away from over and over again. I love this idea because it casts aside the idea of perfection. We are all imperfect beings who can tap into our light side and dark side depending on which one we choose to acknowledge. If you can’t tell, I loved this book. I adore Obi-Wan as a character. I adore Qui-Gon as a character. Their development was so nice. The end felt like such a bittersweet way to leave their companionship:( I miss them.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Maria

    A surprise, to be sure, but a welcome one! This gets 5 wars out of 5 stars purely for the fun I've had reading it

  23. 4 out of 5

    Frank-Intergalactic Bookdragon

    The cover makes me so happy I'm crying, it looks just like Last of the Jedi books which was the first full series I read on my own 😭 ----- This will make another fine addition to my collection The cover makes me so happy I'm crying, it looks just like Last of the Jedi books which was the first full series I read on my own 😭 ----- This will make another fine addition to my collection

  24. 5 out of 5

    Kingtchalla83

    Claudia Gray is is a phenomenal author. I've only read her Star Wars books, but ole boy! I found myself highlighting whole sections while reading. Once again I purchased the book with an audio upgrade. Listening to a Stars War is an experience because of the narrator, music and sound effects. The production is unlike any book I've listened to before. **************************************** Master & Apprentice follows Qui-Gon Jinn and Obi-Wan Kenobi, his Padawan. Their relationship is slightly dis Claudia Gray is is a phenomenal author. I've only read her Star Wars books, but ole boy! I found myself highlighting whole sections while reading. Once again I purchased the book with an audio upgrade. Listening to a Stars War is an experience because of the narrator, music and sound effects. The production is unlike any book I've listened to before. **************************************** Master & Apprentice follows Qui-Gon Jinn and Obi-Wan Kenobi, his Padawan. Their relationship is slightly disjointed because Qui-Gon is a maverick, he bends the rules and challenges the Jedi Council, while Obi-Wan is a bit anal-rententive about rules. However, a call from Rael Averross - an unorthodox Jedi with a past mired in scandal and connection to Qui-Gon - places master and apprentice on a mission that will test their relationship in unimaginable ways. Gray focuses on the the impact of student and teacher relationships. How does the teacher mold the student and vice versa? ***************************************** The complexity of Master &Apprentice is astounding. Gray combines action, mystery, politics, and Jedi lore with enormous emotional heft. My investment extended beyond the two main characters. Rael Averross, an original character created for this book, is compelling and I need to know more about his journey. Also, the main conflict of who is terrorizing Pijal - the planet they are called to investigate- is so well done. My mouth hit the floor at the end. **************************************** Now my TBR list has expand because Count Dooku gets an audiobook drama original from Audibl and Rael is making an appearance. If you're a Jedi fan buy immediately. Oh, and remember force-bonding!

  25. 5 out of 5

    janel

    It’s me, book, not you. I’ll try again soon when I am less grumpy.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Donna

    Yes, it's another Star Wars book. And again, I highly recommend the audios. They make for a fun afternoon. While the original Star Wars cast is my favorite, Qui-Gon Jinn and Obi-Wan Kenobi are my second favorite. I'll admit first that this one started off a little slow for me. The set up seemed too long. Once that was out of the way the story picked up and I was reeled in. I liked the developing relationships in this. And not just with the two Jedis but also the other characters. They were all a Yes, it's another Star Wars book. And again, I highly recommend the audios. They make for a fun afternoon. While the original Star Wars cast is my favorite, Qui-Gon Jinn and Obi-Wan Kenobi are my second favorite. I'll admit first that this one started off a little slow for me. The set up seemed too long. Once that was out of the way the story picked up and I was reeled in. I liked the developing relationships in this. And not just with the two Jedis but also the other characters. They were all anchored into the story. I think that is what this author does well. Her peeps seem believable. So 4 stars.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Moony MeowPoff

    There's no emotion - there's is peace. There is no ignorance - there is knowlegde There is no passion - there is serenity. There is no chaos - there is harmony Propechy in dreams is possible through the illumination of the active intellect over our soul. - Ibn Rushd, Also known as Averros I loved that i got more time with Qui Gon and Obi-Wan, that i could get to see how they acted together, more. Why they were so good together as master and apprentice and how they overcame differenses and tried to There's no emotion - there's is peace. There is no ignorance - there is knowlegde There is no passion - there is serenity. There is no chaos - there is harmony Propechy in dreams is possible through the illumination of the active intellect over our soul. - Ibn Rushd, Also known as Averros I loved that i got more time with Qui Gon and Obi-Wan, that i could get to see how they acted together, more. Why they were so good together as master and apprentice and how they overcame differenses and tried to work things out. The only thing missing? MORE. The last pages broke my heart, even though i knew they were coming... Claudia Gray writes amazing.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Ozymandias

    The Republic era is a hard one to work with. It was one of the chief faults of Lucas’s prequel trilogy that he never managed to make the galaxy of the Republic really compelling in the same way that the Empire’s was. And the worst failing of all was how dull he made the Jedi. It turns out that when you take the awesomeness of space wizards with laser swords and place them in a stale bureaucracy the stale bureaucracy wins. And nothing epitomizes that better than The Phantom Menace, where the gala The Republic era is a hard one to work with. It was one of the chief faults of Lucas’s prequel trilogy that he never managed to make the galaxy of the Republic really compelling in the same way that the Empire’s was. And the worst failing of all was how dull he made the Jedi. It turns out that when you take the awesomeness of space wizards with laser swords and place them in a stale bureaucracy the stale bureaucracy wins. And nothing epitomizes that better than The Phantom Menace, where the galaxy’s at peace and the Jedi spend most of their time in negotiations with evil yet oddly motiveless multinationals. Finding drama or exotic characters in this setting and making them seem important is a challenge to say the least. Qui-Gon Jinn’s a pretty basic example of an underwritten character: a Jedi with a vaguely rebellious reputation who does nothing radical enough to earn that reputation and has very little that makes him stand apart from other Jedi. Even with the great Liam Neeson doing his best in the role, we’re never told why we should care. And so it is with great pleasure that I can report that Qui-Gon’s probably the most interesting character in here. Not the most entertaining, that prize goes to the two gem thieves (one an ex-slave, the other raised entirely by protocol droids) whose buddy antics really amuse, but certainly the deepest and most sympathetic. Gray’s way into Qui-Gon’s soul is through his self-doubt. He and Obi-Wan are not getting along. Neither actively dislikes the other, but they struggle to understand each other and each feel that he has failed to bridge the gap between them. Qui-Gon in particular is secretive and allusive, something the more direct Obi-Wan cannot stand. And that incomprehensibility only intensifies as Qui-Gon’s prophetic interests grow. Qui-Gon’s character journey is pretty impressive given that on the surface little seems to have changed. Qui-Gon starts off as a frustratingly pragmatic Jedi and he ends the same way. However, what this story is about is essentially his renewal of faith. That’s a somewhat overblown way of describing it of course. Qui-Gon never doubted that he was a Jedi or questioned his duty. But while he had been interested in prophecy since a child he had come to accept that they were more metaphorical than true. Now he’s receiving visions and carefully considering the prophecy that “when the kyber that is not kyber shines forth, the time of prophecy will be at hand.” And suddenly he finds his faith returning, only not as a youthful obsession but as the more thoughtful consideration of a seasoned campaigner. Making Qui-Gon essentially a lapsed believer was probably the cleverest thing this book did, but I found Obi-Wan’s initial love of flying less clever and more the sort of ‘oh, let’s show the origins of even the most basic of characteristics.’ Han Solo’s name, anyone? That’s not to say that Obi-Wan is badly done, but this story isn’t his own. As a a bit of a stick-in-the-mud he’s not exactly enthralling. Yet. I’m more pleased with some of the supporting cast. Dooku’s about the only major character who’s more wasted than Qui-Gon, and in Qui-Gon’s recollections we get to see Dooku as a great and noble knight. In a strange way he and Qui-Gon are both perfectly matched and the worst possible choice. He shares Qui-Gon’s obsession with prophecy, but recognizes its danger. It’s Qui-Gon himself who pushes him to resume his studies, and the desire to know and control the future is what consumes him. But in a subtle way that those not in the know could believably misconstrue. In addition, we get probably the most radical Jedi out there: Rael Averross, a scruffy, emotional Jedi who loves brawls, smoking cigarettes, and sleeping with women. He’s another of Dooku’s brood, but while he’s very messed up in the head he’s not as far gone as his former Master. Rather, he’s torn up with guilt about the death of his former Padawan and determined that his current charge shall not suffer the same fate. He’s troubled in all sorts of ways that undermine his good heart. The story itself is the sort of thing that a Republic story is always about: random political machinations on a far-off world that don’t have any major impact on galactic events because nothing can change that morass. That said, this one does work better than most and we have the lovely Czerka corporation (from KOTOR!) showing up to ruin everyone’s lives. This lack of real incident would normally be a major flaw, but the focus on internal conflict means that the plot becomes almost irrelevant. In fact, I didn’t notice how few combat scenes there were until I thought back on it and realized there were only three. Three scenes in the entire book, and none lasted over a chapter or managed to be all that interesting. In fact, they were probably the worst written and least interesting scenes in the book since I had a not-very-clear impression of what was going on. Yet I was so carried away I didn’t notice. The book’s final twist is unexpected enough to be brilliant, though I do wish we got to know more of the motivation behind it. I’m not claiming I know the solution to every mystery I read, but the culprit’s usually at least on my list of possible suspects. The climax itself is more of an anticlimax. But that’s okay. From a character standpoint it told us exactly what we needed to know. I have to say that I was extremely impressed by this book, and even more so for the fact that it takes place in a time when it’s very hard to tell good stories. Qui-Gon has never been done better. He’s a fascinating enigma. A rulebreaking mystic who somehow manages to combine respect for authority with the conviction that he knows better than them. And best of all, if you watch The Phantom Menace it seems to match completely what Lucas was trying to do. At the least it seems to give depth to the blank slate that is Qui-Gon. I actually came away wanting to see more. More of Qui-Gon! Crazy. This is the sort of story that can only be told in novel form. Qui-Gon’s distinctions are subtle, and subtle has never been Star Wars’ speciality. More to the point, we can never understand him if we only know what is said and not what is thought. In short, this is the perfect matching of format and story. Gray’s written the best novels in the new EU, and this is completely true to form. Like her previous books, it shines light on a little-explored era to bring us a story of great character depth. Good book, highly recommended.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Lindsey

    I didn't know I was possible that these books just keep getting better and better. This one brought to light so many things in the universe. And I realized I might just be as much in love with Qui-Gon as I am with Kylo or even Anakin. The single Jedi that I actually respect. He had such a wider way of looking at things. I had a moment were in yelled at yoda-- because good lord the Jedi council got it all so damned wrong, and in all these stories you see it's their arrogance. Their willingness to I didn't know I was possible that these books just keep getting better and better. This one brought to light so many things in the universe. And I realized I might just be as much in love with Qui-Gon as I am with Kylo or even Anakin. The single Jedi that I actually respect. He had such a wider way of looking at things. I had a moment were in yelled at yoda-- because good lord the Jedi council got it all so damned wrong, and in all these stories you see it's their arrogance. Their willingness to step in only when they want to, but not in other ways. This story had to much richness to it, we dove deep into a character that was killed off so quickly in the prequels. You meet Obi-Wan as a Padawan and yeah, I don't like Obi-Wan. I kinda wanna write fanfic kicking his ass. He was an arrogant little thing. And an adult too. There was such a build to what lead to the fall of the Jedi. I adored that we dive deeper into prophecies. And if I'm not mistaken... there was a prediction for Rey and Ben in them. I had to listen to it a few times, but they had to be them. If you read no other Star Wars book-- read this one!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Tait Sougstad

    Prepare yourself to be dazzled with council meetings, political discussions, teacher/student angst, and characters as flat as the paper they are printed on. Qui Gon and Obi Wan must wrestle with the ethical perils of corporatocracy, cultural imperialism, slavery, prophecies, and the Jedi code. Once again, Claudia Gray sculpts a lengthy and monotonous young-adult sci-fi, baptizes it in a bacta tank, which the Disney Star Wars story group rubber stamped for production. (Are you guys even reading t Prepare yourself to be dazzled with council meetings, political discussions, teacher/student angst, and characters as flat as the paper they are printed on. Qui Gon and Obi Wan must wrestle with the ethical perils of corporatocracy, cultural imperialism, slavery, prophecies, and the Jedi code. Once again, Claudia Gray sculpts a lengthy and monotonous young-adult sci-fi, baptizes it in a bacta tank, which the Disney Star Wars story group rubber stamped for production. (Are you guys even reading this stuff before it goes out the door anymore??) Behold, a typical quote: "You’re lord regent Rael. The council wouldn’t have named you to the position and expected you to do nothing. Your mandate is to help govern a world. And if you are willing to shift from an absolute monarchy to a constitutional one, why shouldn’t the status of lunar citizens be reexamined as well." Not quite as memorable as, "That's no moon," but still has its own ring to it. The plot and characters were set up out of a dungeon master's playbook. New world, new edgy Jedi character, new side characters, all with their distinctive flair and lengthy back story. The history of everything is told with encyclopedic detail, all perfectly superfluous and disposable. The way new Star Wars canon is going, we will likely never hear about any of it anywhere else. Every motivation ends up being entirely arbitrary, and characters are inflexible in cartoony ways. Master and Apprentice find time in unusual situations to work out their differences. It must be Jedi standard operating procedure to offer criticism or affirmation in the middle of a firefight. In the end, (view spoiler)[no one dies and all of the bad kids go to school. (hide spoiler)] Also, I generally enjoy Jonathan Davis's audiobook performances. However, this book was full of the irritating "quiet yell" voice he uses during intense situations, where the characters are supposed to be yelling over the din, but Davis doesn't want to actually yell in the soundbooth, so he does sort of a glottal squeeze and turns everyone into an old man. Also, I'm not sure this was intentional or he just ran out of voices for the panoply of side characters, but every artist or "alternative" character has a sing-song lisp. This was a great opportunity to add some depth to the prequels, but the opportunity was missed. Star Wars (and Gray) needs to get back to what it is trying to accomplish with these books. Right now, it is diluting the formula, and I'm not sure how long people will stand for it before they get bored and move on. If you are looking to the novels for additional insights and expansion of the core Star Wars story, don't waste your time with this one. There is some discussion of the "prophecies" mentioned in the prequels, and some development of young Obi Wan, but that's about it. +1 star for reviving the Faleen from canon purgatory. Long live the Black Sun.

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