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Hey, Water!

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Splash! A little girl plays a game of hide-and-seek with water, in this nonfiction picture book. Hey, water! I know you! You're all around. Join a young girl as she explores her surroundings and sees that water is everywhere. But water doesn't always look the same, it doesn't always feel the same, and it shows up in lots of different shapes. Water can be a lake, it can b Splash! A little girl plays a game of hide-and-seek with water, in this nonfiction picture book. Hey, water! I know you! You're all around. Join a young girl as she explores her surroundings and sees that water is everywhere. But water doesn't always look the same, it doesn't always feel the same, and it shows up in lots of different shapes. Water can be a lake, it can be steam, it can be a tear, or it can even be a snowman. As the girl discovers water in nature, in weather, in her home, and even inside her own body, water comes to life, and kids will find excitement and joy in water and its many forms.


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Splash! A little girl plays a game of hide-and-seek with water, in this nonfiction picture book. Hey, water! I know you! You're all around. Join a young girl as she explores her surroundings and sees that water is everywhere. But water doesn't always look the same, it doesn't always feel the same, and it shows up in lots of different shapes. Water can be a lake, it can b Splash! A little girl plays a game of hide-and-seek with water, in this nonfiction picture book. Hey, water! I know you! You're all around. Join a young girl as she explores her surroundings and sees that water is everywhere. But water doesn't always look the same, it doesn't always feel the same, and it shows up in lots of different shapes. Water can be a lake, it can be steam, it can be a tear, or it can even be a snowman. As the girl discovers water in nature, in weather, in her home, and even inside her own body, water comes to life, and kids will find excitement and joy in water and its many forms.

30 review for Hey, Water!

  1. 4 out of 5

    Betsy

    Grown-ups are problematic. Somehow, they’ve managed to work it so that they’re on all the review committees that determine the best books for kids. How is that fair? Tell me, can you think of any book committees that have an honorary child member? I’m not saying it’s impossible, I’m just saying it doesn’t happen all that often. I don’t need to spell out the problems with this kind of situation to you, because you know precisely what happens when a bunch of adults all come together to determine t Grown-ups are problematic. Somehow, they’ve managed to work it so that they’re on all the review committees that determine the best books for kids. How is that fair? Tell me, can you think of any book committees that have an honorary child member? I’m not saying it’s impossible, I’m just saying it doesn’t happen all that often. I don’t need to spell out the problems with this kind of situation to you, because you know precisely what happens when a bunch of adults all come together to determine the “best” of anything. They’ll sit around eating chocolate, and then inevitably veer off and select the books that appeal to their particular (read: grown-up) sensibilities. This has happened to me personally more times than I can count. So much so, that I’ve had to begin to actively notice the kinds of books that I pour inadequate attention upon. For example, I have a hard time properly accepting and praising nonfiction and informational books for the youngest of readers. Apparently if it’s fiction I’m on board from the get-go, but nonfiction’s another bag entirely. But while I rail against them sometimes, this is actually why committees can be useful entities. Because even when I fail to notice the great early nonfiction books, I have co-workers who are capable of dragging my attention away from the shiny fiction to the extraordinary nonfiction. And Hey, Water! by Antoinette Portis is one of those extraordinary books. Appealing to older and younger readers alike, Portis has outdone herself with the book’s design and art. A book for everybody. After all, who doesn’t like water? “Hey, water! I know you! You’re all around.” Our guide, a brown-skinned girl named Zoe, begins to list all the different ways you can encounter this essential resource. Whether it’s in your home, in large bodies of water, or as a teardrop falling from your eye, water is positively everywhere. Steam and fog. Snowmen and fish. Even in your own body! What’s the best thing to say after all of that? “Hey, water, thank you!” Backmatter includes in-depth explanations of water forms, the water cycle, different ways to best conserve water, and a small Bibliography of books to talk more about water, as well as some that contain hands-on water experiments. I’m a little dense when it comes to good book design. But, like all other aspects of book creation, when it’s particularly well done it has a tendency to stand up and wait for you to take notice. I noticed. I noticed how the beginning of the book shows the water pouring down, then up, then down. I noticed the trickle morph effortlessly into a stream, then a river, with every page turn until the water poured all over the page (no border in sight) as an ocean. I even noticed how Portis’s perspective manages to slowly pull in, so that you go from lake to pool to puddle to dewdrop to tear. None of these choices are happenstance. Each one has been carefully considered and put into action using the artist’s brush and sumi ink (combined with digital coloring). I remember when Portis debuted years ago, back in 2006, with her remarkable Not a Box (which remains in print to this day). In those days she brought a simplicity of form to her books, along with some thick black lines. Since that time her range has expanded. She begins this book with similar lines, but then as you read you come across mist and fog. You see when she made the decision to make the snowflakes white balls on a blue background or blue balls on a white background. And look at how she made the dewdrop ever so slightly translucent, all with her brushwork. A book that has had care and time poured into its pages exudes that love when you read it. There is not a drop of paint or a flick of a brush out of place here. One of my colleagues is particularly enthused by science books for kids. It was she who pointed out to me that while the art of this book is great, it’s the text that gives it that little extra oomph, allowing it to stand heads and shoulders over the competition. Why? Well, let’s talk about trends in nonfiction picture books for a second. There’s been a real push recently for publishers to churn out more STEM related books for younger readers. Publishers have complied, but some noticed that the wider the ages of your audience, the better your book will sell. So the trend is to create a picture book on a nonfiction subject with text for older readers in the main body of the book, and then to also have text for younger readers either at the bottom of the page or on the side. The idea is that you can then sell it to all sorts of kids. Smart thinking but it can lead to awkward juxtapositions. Sometimes it’s the younger text that’s prominent with miniscule type layered in odd crevices on the page for the older kids. Sometimes it’s confusing and when you read both texts it feels disjointed. Surely there’s a way to do it that’s seamless. You know where I’m going with this. In Hey, Water! Portis is taking this trend in nonfiction book publishing and improving upon it. You might not even notice on a first or second read, but each page contains one large word that describes what you’re thinking. “River”. “Iceberg.” “Bug”. So, basically, you could read these words with a very small child and wait to read the rest of the text until they’re older. The “older” text, for the record, is also supremely simple. It’s tackling big ideas with simple words and images, which is always one of the hardest jobs to do in this business. Most of the text is perfectly placed. There is, however, one moment where the book likens an iceberg to a rock, and then jokes that it’s a rock that can float or a rock you can skate on. I could see some scientifically minded gatekeepers not caring much for that, saying that it misleads children into thinking that ice is rocks. A minor quibble. For my part, I discovered that if you take the backmatter into account, this book is almost for three different reading levels, rather than two. After all, the explanation of water forms, the water cycle, conserving water, and the Bibliography are all better suited for older kids (or, more likely, parents that forgot all this stuff years ago and need to answer their 3-year-old’s question about precipitation). In the end, this book is supremely smart. Shall I entertain a prediction about it then? If this book is not turned into a board book with those simple words and images in the next year or so, I will eat my hat. Eat it with salt and butter and a little droplet of sauvignon blanc on the side. One thing that did confuse me about the book was no fault of the book itself. As I turned pages I kept expected die-cuts. Weird, right? Maybe it was the fact that this book reminded me of the work of Laura Vaccaro Seeger. Maybe I just felt a die-cut would have been appropriate. It was only after I’d pondered this puzzle for a little while that I realized the answer. In 2018 the extremely talented Christy Hale produced the nonfiction picture book, Water Land: Land and Water Forms Around the World. A book replete with, you guessed it, die-cuts. Like Portis’s title, Hale is unafraid to zoom in and back up from different bodies of water. Unlike Portis, Hale is far more interested in how water intersects with land. Consider it a companion book to this one then. Both have a vested interest in informing young children about water around the world. Their focus is just a bit skewed from one another. The moral of the story? Remember the little children. Remember that they deserve as many books as their elders. I’ll admit that with the increased scrutiny on nonfiction books for kids, we’re seeing a level of artistry, previously restricted to fiction, coming out on a wide array of various nonfiction subjects. The days when publishers would churn out rote, dull books on the subjects teachers needed are far from gone. Still, little glinting gems like Hey, Water! are becoming increasingly common. Perhaps they can win awards. Perhaps they can win hearts and minds. And maybe, just maybe, some little kid out there will read this book and, for whatever reason, love it dearly. Hey, Portis! You made a really good book. For all ages.

  2. 4 out of 5

    KC

    All about water...

  3. 4 out of 5

    Caroline

    An awesome introductory picture book about the water cycle and how important water is! I would definitely use this sneaky non-fiction book in storytime!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Ms. B

    How many forms of water can you name? Find out if you were able to think of as many as Antoinette Portis did in this tribute to water.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Sandy Brehl

    This is a delightful and kid-friendly nonfiction picture book about the many ways in which water surrounds us. The text is minimal, with simple secondary text (in smaller font) on many pages to clarify the content: ICEBERG (a rock that floats) or RIVER (rushing to the sea). Back matter describes the states of water (gas, liquid, solid) and other science content, making this a perfect pairing with Miranda Paul's WATER IS WATER. Consider pairing (tripling it!) also with Luxbacher's DEEP UNDERWATER This is a delightful and kid-friendly nonfiction picture book about the many ways in which water surrounds us. The text is minimal, with simple secondary text (in smaller font) on many pages to clarify the content: ICEBERG (a rock that floats) or RIVER (rushing to the sea). Back matter describes the states of water (gas, liquid, solid) and other science content, making this a perfect pairing with Miranda Paul's WATER IS WATER. Consider pairing (tripling it!) also with Luxbacher's DEEP UNDERWATER, especially the visuals, including endpapers. The three titles also provide excellent text models: rhyming informational text, parallel informational text, and a dreamy-magical semi-narrative text in first person voice.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Shaye Miller

    This nonfiction book is an excellent resource for children learning all about water in its many forms, including the water cycle. Additionally, it's written in a way that both established readers AND emergent readers can enjoy. Amidst the prose of each page, a new word is shared to go with each illustration. Younger children can use context clues to decode the word while older children can read the details. The artwork is exactly what I love to see in a children's nonfiction book -- just enough This nonfiction book is an excellent resource for children learning all about water in its many forms, including the water cycle. Additionally, it's written in a way that both established readers AND emergent readers can enjoy. Amidst the prose of each page, a new word is shared to go with each illustration. Younger children can use context clues to decode the word while older children can read the details. The artwork is exactly what I love to see in a children's nonfiction book -- just enough details to thoroughly intrigue a young reader, but not overly complicated. Be sure to examine the back matter for more information on water forms, the water cycle, how to conserve water, and where to go for more reading. The artwork for this book was made with brush and sumi ink. Color was added digitally. For more children's literature, middle grade literature, and YA literature reviews, feel free to visit my personal blog at The Miller Memo!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    I was kind of shocked by how much I liked this - and my kid really responded to it. The design is great, the text is so simple, just beautiful altogether. I don't know why this little book about water made me so happy but it did. I was kind of shocked by how much I liked this - and my kid really responded to it. The design is great, the text is so simple, just beautiful altogether. I don't know why this little book about water made me so happy but it did.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Emily

    Loved this simple and lovely exploration of water in our lives. I'm also a sucker for good back matter, and this book provides several pages that go into greater depth in the water cycle, states of water, the scarcity of water, and ways to use it responsibly. Loved this simple and lovely exploration of water in our lives. I'm also a sucker for good back matter, and this book provides several pages that go into greater depth in the water cycle, states of water, the scarcity of water, and ways to use it responsibly.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Laura Harrison

    Hey, Water! is a deceptively simple, brilliant, non-fiction picture book. I am in awe of the creative approach and wonderful illustrations. Every children's library needs this book. Phenomenal job Antoinette Portis! Hey, Water! is a deceptively simple, brilliant, non-fiction picture book. I am in awe of the creative approach and wonderful illustrations. Every children's library needs this book. Phenomenal job Antoinette Portis!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Sunday

    Introducing PreK-1st graders to observing and describing the world around them? A little girl notices the role of water in her everyday life and in her surroundings—a sprinkler, a water faucet, a stream, a lake. She also notices that water sometimes tries to hide – or change state—“Water, even when you try to fool me, I know you.” Portis’ illustrations are worthy of close looking and her language is poetic, worthy of reading, rereading, and savoring along the way. “You cover most of the earth—sa Introducing PreK-1st graders to observing and describing the world around them? A little girl notices the role of water in her everyday life and in her surroundings—a sprinkler, a water faucet, a stream, a lake. She also notices that water sometimes tries to hide – or change state—“Water, even when you try to fool me, I know you.” Portis’ illustrations are worthy of close looking and her language is poetic, worthy of reading, rereading, and savoring along the way. “You cover most of the earth—salty, surging, and mysterious.” There are also labels (in a larger white font) that identify the source of the water (e.g., sprinkler, dewdrop, tear, rain). The back matter includes an explanation of states of water, the water cycle, and water conservation and includes illustrations/graphics that are kid-friendly. I’d read this aloud to students – more than once—and then leave in the classroom library for partners to grab and read together. Suggestions for an INTERACTIVE READ ALOUD: • READ ALOUD the book with a focus on the poetic verse first (not the labels). There’s such a beautiful flow to Portis’ language; stopping to read the labels might interrupt the flow. Then return later and read the labels or both. • For another read, focus on Portis’ VOCABULARY – What does the author mean when she uses the word gurgle to describe water? What does that look like? And trickle? And spray? And roar? And pour? PLUS the ILLUSTRATIONS – How do the illustrations reveal the water spraying? Pouring? • PROJECT THE BACK MATTER – Portis’ text in the backmatter is a little steep for prek-1 but I’d still read it aloud and then focus on her illustrations/graphics. Young students can look closely and figure out what she’s trying to convey with you as a coach to support their thinking. I’d also use this book as a mentor for writing in WRITING WORKSHOP (even with 2nd/3rd grade). Again, Portis’ language is poetic. Love the words she uses to describe the movement of water. She also uses comparisons – “as hard as a rock” and “soft as a feather.” Might help students think about how they can describe whatever they are studying/researching. With older students, I’d use her backmatter, too. It’s well written, clearly focused and the illustrations/graphics support the text. What if older students wrote a poetic text on a topic and then an additional piece with illustrations for backmatter? This format of this book could be helpful in that endeavor. A note –Portis compares ice to a “rock” and then continues with “a rock that floats or a rock we can skate on.” If students are thrown off by this and start saying that “ice is a rock” – remind them that on a previous page she wrote “Sometimes you freeze as hard as a rock—” and she’s continuing that comparison on the next two pages. So ice is “rock-like”—both ice and rock have a quality of being hard but ice is not a rock. If students are still confused, examine the following pages where Portis compares snowflakes to feathers and fancy lace.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Joan

    I really loved this book! There’s so much enthusiasm in both the text and illustrations. It covers all the sources of water ending with “Hey water, thank you!”. In the after matter, there is an explanation of the 3 states of water including the info that water coming out of a kettle as steam is not a gaseous form of water but is water vapor, a liquid form of water. I’m impressed with how careful Portis was in what she wrote! She also included a wonderful explanation of the need for water conserv I really loved this book! There’s so much enthusiasm in both the text and illustrations. It covers all the sources of water ending with “Hey water, thank you!”. In the after matter, there is an explanation of the 3 states of water including the info that water coming out of a kettle as steam is not a gaseous form of water but is water vapor, a liquid form of water. I’m impressed with how careful Portis was in what she wrote! She also included a wonderful explanation of the need for water conservation. There is also a bibliography meant for youth readers. While this deserved the Siebert Honor award, I’m sorry it didn’t grab a Caldecott as well. Highly recommended for beginning science books.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Rachel Grover

    Super cute explanation of water in its various forms, geared for littles. 4 stars because some of the additional resources in the back about water are a bit too advanced for the intended reader and I didn't notice any kind of intentional organization to the places water is found. Would be great for elementary libraries. Super cute explanation of water in its various forms, geared for littles. 4 stars because some of the additional resources in the back about water are a bit too advanced for the intended reader and I didn't notice any kind of intentional organization to the places water is found. Would be great for elementary libraries.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Michele Knott

    Love this book by Portis, concentrating on all the water there is around us. From water in a drinking glass to water in a bathtub, from water in a dewdrop to water in a lake - Portis compares the different forms, shapes and properties water can take. This is one of those books that I may read multiple times and find new ideas in her groupings and comparisons. The backmatter also has information that has classroom uses. From a map of the water cycle to information on how to conserve water, you wo Love this book by Portis, concentrating on all the water there is around us. From water in a drinking glass to water in a bathtub, from water in a dewdrop to water in a lake - Portis compares the different forms, shapes and properties water can take. This is one of those books that I may read multiple times and find new ideas in her groupings and comparisons. The backmatter also has information that has classroom uses. From a map of the water cycle to information on how to conserve water, you won't want to miss this information!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Mariko

    Hey, Water! is a simple but beautifully crafted children's book written for kids of young ages to understand water in all its various forms. The illustrator uses a variety of textures in their drawings to bring to life each form of water. Each page only has a few words, so it would be great for younger audiences with shorter attention spans. The book can be used as a fun and creative way to explain the concept of water as a solid, liquid, and gas. The author includes additional educational conte Hey, Water! is a simple but beautifully crafted children's book written for kids of young ages to understand water in all its various forms. The illustrator uses a variety of textures in their drawings to bring to life each form of water. Each page only has a few words, so it would be great for younger audiences with shorter attention spans. The book can be used as a fun and creative way to explain the concept of water as a solid, liquid, and gas. The author includes additional educational content on the water cycle and conserving water on the last few pages which can be great to share with older audiences. Overall, it would be the perfect addition to any pre-K/Kindergarten class library!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Erin

    A very cute and simple introduction to water for preschoolers. There's some sources in the back for further learning about water, and also a pretty nice water cycle chart. A very cute and simple introduction to water for preschoolers. There's some sources in the back for further learning about water, and also a pretty nice water cycle chart.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    A simple, fun book that is perfect for teaching kids about water in its many shifting forms.

  17. 5 out of 5

    molliekay

    A fun and simple way to explain how water is in our everyday lives. I really hope Portis does more nonfiction!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Petra Fuentes

    Hey, Water! By Antoinette Portis is an informational picture book. I found this title in the Sibert Award link under the nonfiction digital resources. This is a concept book about water. It is told by a little girl, she starts off by saying, "Hey, water! I know you! You're all around." Water can be seen coming out of a faucet, sprinkler, shower, and a hose. Water is shown in a stream, river, sea, ocean, lake, pool, puddle, dewdrop, tears, rain, steam, cloud, fog, ice cube, iceberg, ice rink, sno Hey, Water! By Antoinette Portis is an informational picture book. I found this title in the Sibert Award link under the nonfiction digital resources. This is a concept book about water. It is told by a little girl, she starts off by saying, "Hey, water! I know you! You're all around." Water can be seen coming out of a faucet, sprinkler, shower, and a hose. Water is shown in a stream, river, sea, ocean, lake, pool, puddle, dewdrop, tears, rain, steam, cloud, fog, ice cube, iceberg, ice rink, snow, snowflakes, snowman, and in Zoe too! This informational picture book is a celebration of water. Water is represented in different forms and places. At the end of the book there are examples of liquids, solids, and gases. There is also a diagram of the water cycle and ideas of how to conserve water. The illustrations contain contrasting colors that are appealing. I would use this book as a read aloud with grades Prek-2. It can be used to teach about water, water cycle or conserving water. I really liked this book. I read the hardcover book.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Becca

    I prefer more colorful illustrations; however, one cannot help but admire Portis' style and her lovely expose on water and it's place in our lives. Delightful to share with a child. I prefer more colorful illustrations; however, one cannot help but admire Portis' style and her lovely expose on water and it's place in our lives. Delightful to share with a child.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Mr.

    Simple and great illustrations. I would buy this

  21. 4 out of 5

    Molly

    This book lists the different forms of water depicted on each page as the narrator talks to water. There is an explanation of the different stages of the water cycle and how water can come in different forms in the back.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Xuejiao Li

    It is a great nonfiction picture book to understand everything about water, such as the water circle and the form of water.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Andréa

    You can read this one straight through as an informative text with the sentences in black type, or you can explore it as more of a concept book with the stamped-style words.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Earl

    A playful ode to water and its different forms with informative backmatter.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Beverly

    Water in all its forms and manifestations, from puddle to swimming pool, from stream to ocean. Includes information about the 3 states of water and the water cycle in the back of the book. The illustrations are very nice.

  26. 4 out of 5

    LAURA

    Hey, Water! By Antoinette Portis, is a book primarily for the primary grades, K-4th. It talks about the different variation of water. It informs us about the forms and shapes that water takes. “Freeze as hard as a rock, ice cube. A rock that floats, iceberg.” Furthermore, it shows the various areas that water is located, such as, faucet, sprinkler, shower, hose, stream, river. It informs us about its noise, “Quiet and calm. Slide down my cheeks without a sound. Tear.” Portis shows her audience t Hey, Water! By Antoinette Portis, is a book primarily for the primary grades, K-4th. It talks about the different variation of water. It informs us about the forms and shapes that water takes. “Freeze as hard as a rock, ice cube. A rock that floats, iceberg.” Furthermore, it shows the various areas that water is located, such as, faucet, sprinkler, shower, hose, stream, river. It informs us about its noise, “Quiet and calm. Slide down my cheeks without a sound. Tear.” Portis shows her audience that water isn’t always the same, it can take and come in many forms. At the end of the book there are pages with information about the forms of water, liquid, solid and gas as well as the water cycle, and how to conserve water. I would recommend this book in a third-grade science class as that is the grade where they focus on the water cycle. The images are great, as they take up most of the page to show us where water is located, how it looks, what it feels like, and even how it sounds. I found this book in the Robert F. Sibert Medal 2020 Honor Books.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Katherine

    I read this book on YouTube and found it on the Robert F. Sibal list of winner books from 2020. This book teaches students about water that is all around them. It talks about everything from the oceans, the tears that fall from your eyes, and icebergs. I think this book would be perfect for students in primary grades, especially during science when learning about the water cycle. I think it would be great for students to read of all of the things that are made up of water around them. It could b I read this book on YouTube and found it on the Robert F. Sibal list of winner books from 2020. This book teaches students about water that is all around them. It talks about everything from the oceans, the tears that fall from your eyes, and icebergs. I think this book would be perfect for students in primary grades, especially during science when learning about the water cycle. I think it would be great for students to read of all of the things that are made up of water around them. It could be paired with a book about countries around the world that may not have safe water for their citizens.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Margie

    Close to two-thirds of our planet is covered in water. Of that water, ninety-six point five percent is contained in our oceans. Depending on your geographic location you can dig through the ground and reach a point that is completely saturated with water. You have found the water table. There is a certain amount of water in the air we breathe measured by our humidity (currently ninety-seven percent in my community). You would be astonished to realize how much of our blood contains water. Liquid Close to two-thirds of our planet is covered in water. Of that water, ninety-six point five percent is contained in our oceans. Depending on your geographic location you can dig through the ground and reach a point that is completely saturated with water. You have found the water table. There is a certain amount of water in the air we breathe measured by our humidity (currently ninety-seven percent in my community). You would be astonished to realize how much of our blood contains water. Liquid life is literally everywhere, whether we can see it or not. Being one of those fortunate people, within five minutes the expanse of Lake Michigan is available for me to see, spread out until it touches the far horizon. It is both a humbling and joyful moment. Hey, Water! (Neal Porter Books, Holiday House, March 26, 2019) written and illustrated by Antoinette Portis (Wait, Best Frints in the Whole Universe and Now) explores all the marvelous manners in which water touches our everyday existence. My full recommendation: https://librariansquest.blogspot.com/...

  29. 4 out of 5

    Deborah

    Water, poetically presented in all its many forms. I love how simple and clear this book is, and that the main text is followed by more detailed back matter — science facts that back everything up, plus resources — making the book suitable for a wide range of ages.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Teresa Bateman

    This book rejoices in water in all its forms and disguises, coming from any number of sources, and interacting with the world and the people who live in it. Lyrical text combines with brush and ink illustrations that have been digitally colored, showing a variety of perspectives. This would be nicely combined with "Ice Boy" for a story time about the water cycle. This book rejoices in water in all its forms and disguises, coming from any number of sources, and interacting with the world and the people who live in it. Lyrical text combines with brush and ink illustrations that have been digitally colored, showing a variety of perspectives. This would be nicely combined with "Ice Boy" for a story time about the water cycle.

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