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Putin v. the People: The Perilous Politics of a Divided Russia

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A fascinating, bottom-up exploration of contemporary Russian politics that sheds new light on why Putin’s grip on power is more fragile then we think What do ordinary Russians think of Putin? Who are his supporters? And why might their support now be faltering? Alive with the voices and experiences of ordinary Russians and elites alike, Sam Greene and Graeme Robertson craf A fascinating, bottom-up exploration of contemporary Russian politics that sheds new light on why Putin’s grip on power is more fragile then we think What do ordinary Russians think of Putin? Who are his supporters? And why might their support now be faltering? Alive with the voices and experiences of ordinary Russians and elites alike, Sam Greene and Graeme Robertson craft a compellingly original account of contemporary Russian politics. Telling the story of Putin’s rule through pivotal episodes such as the aftermath of the "For Fair Elections" protests, the annexation of Crimea, and the War in Eastern Ukraine, Greene and Robertson draw on interviews, surveys, social media data, and leaked documents to reveal how hard Putin has to work to maintain broad popular support, while exposing the changing tactics that the Kremlin has used to bolster his popularity. Unearthing the ambitions, emotions, and divisions that fuel Russian politics, this book illuminates the crossroads to which Putin has led his country and shows why his rule is more fragile than it appears.


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A fascinating, bottom-up exploration of contemporary Russian politics that sheds new light on why Putin’s grip on power is more fragile then we think What do ordinary Russians think of Putin? Who are his supporters? And why might their support now be faltering? Alive with the voices and experiences of ordinary Russians and elites alike, Sam Greene and Graeme Robertson craf A fascinating, bottom-up exploration of contemporary Russian politics that sheds new light on why Putin’s grip on power is more fragile then we think What do ordinary Russians think of Putin? Who are his supporters? And why might their support now be faltering? Alive with the voices and experiences of ordinary Russians and elites alike, Sam Greene and Graeme Robertson craft a compellingly original account of contemporary Russian politics. Telling the story of Putin’s rule through pivotal episodes such as the aftermath of the "For Fair Elections" protests, the annexation of Crimea, and the War in Eastern Ukraine, Greene and Robertson draw on interviews, surveys, social media data, and leaked documents to reveal how hard Putin has to work to maintain broad popular support, while exposing the changing tactics that the Kremlin has used to bolster his popularity. Unearthing the ambitions, emotions, and divisions that fuel Russian politics, this book illuminates the crossroads to which Putin has led his country and shows why his rule is more fragile than it appears.

30 review for Putin v. the People: The Perilous Politics of a Divided Russia

  1. 5 out of 5

    Alex

    Great account about Putin and the Russian People. Lots of data lots of polls lots of stories. the main theme is the relationship of the Russian people with Putin and/or the DUMA (crazy printer).

  2. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    I enjoyed this book and found it informative. It was an interesting read and from a different perspective. It did breeze over a few things and completely ignored public outrage over the Kursk submarine disaster (which I found odd for a book that looked so closely at the relationship between the Russian populace and the Russian government - and Putin, in particular). Another criticism is that the authors would go on tangents that I felt went on for too long and were unnecessary. There were also p I enjoyed this book and found it informative. It was an interesting read and from a different perspective. It did breeze over a few things and completely ignored public outrage over the Kursk submarine disaster (which I found odd for a book that looked so closely at the relationship between the Russian populace and the Russian government - and Putin, in particular). Another criticism is that the authors would go on tangents that I felt went on for too long and were unnecessary. There were also portions that felt a bit condescending, as they pointed out the glaringly obvious.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Joel Blankenship

    Good book encompassing how we should understand domestic support for Putin. Hopefully I can get a more thorough review published.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Mehdi Arian

    Just one sided looked at Putin and his government. Typical type of dark overview of Russia and its government. Nothing new.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Sanna

  6. 4 out of 5

    Mercedes

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jake T Brown

  8. 4 out of 5

    John

  9. 4 out of 5

    Wade Cawood

  10. 5 out of 5

    Mauricio Santoro

  11. 5 out of 5

    Dragan

  12. 5 out of 5

    Az

  13. 5 out of 5

    G Bax

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan

  15. 4 out of 5

    Toby Redington

  16. 4 out of 5

    Sasha Spiridonova

  17. 5 out of 5

    Alex

  18. 5 out of 5

    Molln

  19. 5 out of 5

    Barry

  20. 4 out of 5

    Josefin

  21. 4 out of 5

    Matt James

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jan Klusacek

  23. 4 out of 5

    Marianne

  24. 5 out of 5

    ELM

  25. 5 out of 5

    Heiss

  26. 5 out of 5

    Gintaras Radauskas

  27. 5 out of 5

    Alyssa Benson

  28. 4 out of 5

    Johanna

  29. 4 out of 5

    Gergely

  30. 4 out of 5

    Dave

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